Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ACCORD eye study finds 2 therapies slow diabetic eye disease progression

26.07.2010
In high-risk adults with type 2 diabetes, researchers have found that two therapies may slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease that is the leading cause of vision loss in working-age Americans.

Intensive blood sugar control reduced the progression of diabetic retinopathy compared with standard blood sugar control, and combination lipid therapy with a fibrate and statin also reduced disease progression compared with statin therapy alone. However, intensive blood pressure control provided no additional benefit to patients compared with standard blood pressure control.

Results of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Eye Study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and presented at the 70th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association.

"This is the largest study to date examining the effects of blood sugar, combination lipid therapy, and blood pressure control on the prevention of diabetic retinopathy progression using retinal photographs," said Walter T. Ambrosius, Ph.D., a professor of biostatistical sciences in the Division of Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, and principal investigator of the ACCORD Eye study's coordinating center. "Many people with diabetes have microvascular problems, which can result in problems with the kidneys and amputation of toes and feet, and the only place that you can directly observe the microvasculature is in the back of the eyes. What we have seen in the eyes is potentially an indicator of what is happening in other parts of the body."

Wake Forest Baptist was involved in many ways with the multi-site ACCORD study serving as the coordinating center, a clinical site, and as the head of the study's southeastern clinical center network, under the leadership of David C. Goff, Jr., Ph.D., a professor and chair of epidemiology and prevention, also in the Division of Public Health Sciences.

"The ACCORD Eye Study clearly indicates that intensive glycemic control and fibrate treatment added to statin therapy separately reduce the progression of diabetic retinopathy," said Emily Chew, M.D., chair of the Eye Study and chief of the Clinical Trials Branch of the Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications at the National Eye Institute (NEI). "The main ACCORD findings showed that fibrate treatment added to statin therapy is safe for patients like those involved in the study. However, intensive blood sugar control to near normal glucose levels increased the risk of death and severe low blood sugar, so patients and their doctors must take these potential risks into account when implementing a diabetes treatment plan."

The ACCORD study was a landmark clinical trial that included 10,251 adults with type 2 diabetes who were at especially high risk for heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death. The study evaluated three intensive strategies compared with standard treatments for lowering cardiovascular risks associated with diabetes.

Intensive treatments included control of blood sugar to near normal levels, control of blood pressure to normal levels, and combination treatment of blood lipids with fenofibrate and simvastatin compared to standard treatment with simvastatin alone. Fenofibrate treatment lowers triglycerides and raises the "good" high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, while simvastatin lowers the "bad" low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. All participants were enrolled in the blood sugar trial and in either the blood pressure or lipid trial.

The ACCORD Eye Study involved a subset of 2,856 participants. Researchers analyzed the effects of the treatment strategies on blood vessels in the eye by identifying diabetic retinopathy progression over four years. Diabetic retinopathy is a disease in which blood vessels in the eye's light-sensitive retinal tissue are damaged by diabetes. Blood vessels can begin to leak, causing swelling in the retina, and abnormal new blood vessels can develop, both causing vision loss. In the study, disease progression was identified through retinal photographs that indicated blood vessel changes or by the need for laser or eye surgery to treat abnormal blood vessels.

Compared with standard blood sugar control, intensive control decreased the progression of diabetic retinopathy by about one-third, from 10.4 percent to 7.3 percent, over four years. Participants in the intensive control group had a median blood sugar level of 6.4 percent hemoglobin A1c – a level close to values in people without diabetes. The standard blood sugar control group maintained a median level of 7.5 percent.

"Previous clinical trials have shown the beneficial effects of intensive blood sugar control on slowing the progression of diabetic retinopathy in people with type 1 diabetes or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes," said NEI director Paul A. Sieving, M.D., Ph.D. "The ACCORD Eye Study expands these findings to a larger population of adults who had type 2 diabetes for an average of 10 years, and demonstrates that the eye benefits from the reduction of glucose below previously established levels."

In addition, compared with simvastatin treatment alone, combination lipid therapy with fenofibrate plus simvastatin also reduced disease progression by about one-third, from 10.2 percent to 6.5 percent, over four years. No prior clinical trial has shown that the combination of fenofibrate and simvastatin reduces diabetic eye disease progression.

There were no differences in diabetic retinopathy progression among participants treated to an intensive systolic blood pressure (top number in a reading) target of less than 120 mm Hg compared with those treated to a standard target of less than 140 mm Hg.

"The results of the ACCORD Eye Study are exciting, and have provided new and useful information to ophthalmologists managing patients with diabetic retinopathy," said Craig M. Greven, M.D., professor and chair of the Department of Ophthalmology at Wake Forest Baptist and consultant to the ACCORD Eye Study. "We look forward to using these findings to improve outcomes and prevent visual loss in our patients."

In the main ACCORD study, none of the three treatment strategies resulted in a significant decrease in the combined rates of heart attack, stroke or cardiovascular death compared with standard treatments. However, over about three-and-a-half years of follow up, participants in the intensive blood sugar group had a 22 percent higher risk of death (5.0 percent versus 4.0 percent) and a three times higher risk of seriously low blood sugar (10.5 percent versus 3.5 percent) compared with participants in the standard blood sugar control group.

The ACCORD study began in 2001, and participants were treated and monitored for an average of five years. Results of the blood sugar clinical trial were reported in 2008, when the intensive blood sugar therapy was stopped 18 months early due to an increased risk of death in that treatment group compared with the standard blood sugar control group. Findings from the blood pressure and lipid clinical trials appeared in the April 29, 2010 edition of NEJM.

"A key question in the main ACCORD study was whether intensive glucose control, previously demonstrated to reduce risk of microvascular disease – including eye problems – in diabetes, would reduce large vessel disease that causes problems like heart attacks. Investigators are continuing to evaluate the risks and benefits of the treatment strategies in these high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes," said Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the primary sponsor of the ACCORD study. "Clinicians should individualize treatment for each patient to prevent complications, also incorporating information about conditions such as cardiovascular or visual problems. Lifestyle interventions, including physical activity, weight loss and healthy diets, can improve diabetes control and reduce onset of diabetes."

Find more information about this trial (NCT00542178) at www.clinicaltrials.gov. Visit www.nei.nih.gov/health/diabetic for more information about diabetic retinopathy.

RESOURCES:

National Eye Health Education Program: www.nei.nih.gov/NEHEP

National Diabetes Education Program: http://ndep.nih.gov

ACCORD clinical trial website: www.accordtrial.org/public/index.cfm

Questions and answers about the ACCORD trial: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/heart/other/accord/q_a.htm

Previous ACCORD news releases and publications: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/heart/other/accord/index.htm

Media Contacts for Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center: Jessica Guenzel, jguenzel@wfubmc.edu, (336) 716-3487; Paula Faria, pfaria@wfubmc.edu, (336) 716-1279; or (336) 716-4587.

This release was originally crafted and distributed by the National Eye Institute.

Additional Media Contacts:

National Eye Institute, neinews@nei.nih.gov, (301) 496-5248.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov, (301) 496-4236.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, niddkmedia@mail.nih.gov, (301) 496-3583.

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (www.wfubmc.edu) is an academic health system comprised of Wake Forest University Health Sciences, which operates the university's School of Medicine, Wake Forest University Physicians and North Carolina Baptist Hospital. U.S. News & World Report ranks the School of Medicine among the nation's best medical and osteopathic schools: 33rd in primary care, 44th in research, 23rd for its physician assistant program, and 11th for its joint program with the UNC-Greensboro to train nurse anesthetists. Best Doctors in America includes 214 of the Wake Forest medical school faculty. The institution is in the top third in funding by the National Institutes of Health and fourth in the Southeast in revenues from its licensed intellectual property. The Medical Center has been ranked as one of "America's Best Hospitals" by U.S. News & World Report since 1993.

Jessica Guenzel | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wfubmc.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>