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A face is more than the sum of its parts

10.02.2010
Acquired prosopagnosia reveals what is special about normal face recognition

You stop at a shop window and wonder why someone inside is blatantly staring at you — until you realize this person is you. Scenarios like this are impossible for us to imagine, but quite common for sufferers of acquired prosopagnosia (AP), a condition which can occur after brain damage, hindering the ability to recognize faces.

In a new study published in the March 2010 issue of Elsevier's Cortex (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cortex), researchers have found that the condition is linked to an inability to process faces as a whole, or holistically.

Meike Ramon and Dr Bruno Rossion from the Université de Louvain in Belgium have been investigating the case of PS, a 59 year-old kindergarten teacher and one of the few cases of pure acquired prosopagnosia in the world. She has been suffering from AP since having sustained closed head injury in 1992. Past accounts of the condition have focused on AP sufferers' difficulty in processing the eye-region of a face, or perceiving relative distances between facial features. In their new study, Ramon and Rossion found that both impairments are linked to a common cause: the inability to process faces as a whole.

Participants in the study were asked to match images of faces, which had been manipulated to differ either in a single feature or the distance between two features. As expected, the patient PS had difficulty in the matching task when changes to the faces occurred randomly. Strikingly, however, when told which feature had been changed (e.g. distance between the eyes), her performance profile paralleled that of healthy subjects.

The findings suggest that AP patients are unable to process different elements of the face in parallel and instead "apply a locally restricted, serial processing style, which is particularly inefficient for certain types of information." Knowing which information to look for makes this strategy relatively more efficient. While this may not help AP patients in real-life situations, "it does however shed light on what makes normal face recognition so overwhelmingly efficient: our capacity to simultaneously integrate the multiple facial elements into a unique representation", commented Ramon.

Notes to Editors:

The article is "Impaired processing of relative distances between features and of the eye region in acquired prosopagnosia - Two sides of the same holistic coin?" by Meike Ramon and Bruno Rossion and appears in Cortex, Volume 46, Issue 3 (March 2010), published by Elsevier in Italy. Full text of the article featured above is available to members of the media upon request. Please contact the Elsevier press office, newsroom@elsevier.com. To schedule an interview, contact Meike Ramon, meike.ramon@uclouvain.be.

About Cortex

Cortex is an international journal devoted to the study of cognition and of the relationship between the nervous system and mental processes, particularly as these are reflected in the behaviour of patients with acquired brain lesions, normal volunteers, children with typical and atypical development, and in the activation of brain regions and systems as recorded by functional neuroimaging techniques. It was founded in 1964 by Ennio De Renzi. The Editor in-chief of Cortex is Sergio Della Sala, Professor of Human Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh. Fax: 0131 6513230, e-mail: cortex@ed.ac.uk. Cortex is available online at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00109452

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet (www.thelancet.com) and Cell (www.cell.com), and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier's online solutions include ScienceDirect (www.sciencedirect.com), Scopus (www.scopus.com), Reaxys (www.reaxys.com), MD Consult (www.mdconsult.com) and Nursing Consult (www.nursingconsult.com), which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite (www.scival.com) and MEDai's Pinpoint Review (www.medai.com), which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively.

A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier (www.elsevier.com) employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC (www.reedelsevier.com), a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Valeria Brancolini | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.elsevier.com

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