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Internal medicine and how it correlates to orthopedics and anatomy

An examination of internal medicine reveals that it can be applied to many other fields of medicine, such as orthopedics, because of the human anatomy.

When the human anatomy exhibits congenital or developed flaws that restrict locomotor activity or the ability to function, we can rely on help from the fields of orthopedics and internal medicine. Various conditions such as arthritis, arthrosis, fractures, scoliosis or inflammation of the joints belong to the field of orthopedics, whereas internal medicine focuses on the prevention and diagnosis of such conditions. A fracture that restricts the human anatomy such that orthopedic surgery is required, which in turn leads to internal medicine treatment, highlights how closely the anatomy is tied to orthopedics or internal medicine. Knowledge of the human anatomy allows orthopedic as well as internal medicine specialists carry out appropriate rehabilitation measures. Through blood pressure readings, long-term EKG tests or rectoscopy, internal medicine provides information about the condition of the patient (related to the anatomy). At the same time, this is valuable information for choosing orthopedic treatment methods. These medical fields - orthopedics and internal medicine - exhibit a high degree of interdependency and symbiosis that is always related to the patient's anatomy. Therapies are meanwhile being employed that integrate both internal medicine andorthopedics into the treatment. In the long run, the human anatomy leads to a natural symbiosis between orthopedics and internal medicine because treatment approaches essentially demand the use of both fields.

Anatomy's sphere of activity

Whennephrology (internal medicine) identifies a problem caused by hip dysplasia (orthopedics) , the only path to finding an appropriate solution is to involve both medical fields. The goal of rehabilitation therapy is to relieve chronic pain or restricted body functions through a combination of anatomy, orthopedics and internal medicine expertise. Internal medicine looks at issues involving the immune and vascular systems, respiratory organs, possible infections, cardiology and oncology. In contrast,orthopedics involves surgical procedures (prosthetics for instance), the manufacture of a locomotor apparatus (for bones, muscles, ligaments or joints) or arthrosis treatments. These two fields of medicine rely on basic knowledge of the human anatomy. Without information about our anatomy, a balanced approach that involves both internal medicine and orthopedics would not be possible.

Orthopedics and internal medicine - complementary fields

If internal medicine determines that a hip prosthesis would lead to pulmonary (respiratory organs) problems because of the patient's anatomy, new measures must be carried out. Themutual interdependency of orthopedics and internal medicine is very specific and oriented toward the profile of the patient's anatomy. Successful treatment always requires a comprehensive profile of the patient's anatomy to enable internal medicine to provide the results (documented in the patient's record) to orthopedic specialists and to ensure that corresponding measures are carried out. Every well-trained orthopedic specialist requires the results of internal medicine examinations to gain a better picture of the patient's anatomy.

Anatomy is the focus

"Anatomy" is the key phrase. This is because anatomy, which is always tied to the patient's profile, provides information regarding to what extent internal medicine or orthopedics can find a solution. For this reason it is extremely important that internal medicine specialists have a detailed, exact picture of the patient's anatomy to allow them to determine what role the anatomy plays in the patient's profile.

Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

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Aio! is a new Finnish diagnostic method for rapidly diagnosing an acute myocardial infarct when a patient with chest pains arrives at the hospital or consults a doctor. The diagnostic system Aio! has been developed by Innotrac Diagnostics Oy with the goal of rapidly and accurately identifying in a patient-friendly way the markers secreted into the blood in connection with a myocardial infract. On the basis of the test result, the patient suffering from a myocardial infract can immediately b 19.06.2002 | nachricht Read more

Elevated levels of cholesterol play an even greater role in development of Alzheimer’s, study shows

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Drugs may not be best weapon against teen migraines, study finds

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Insulin Sensitizer Has Anti-inflammatory Effect in Diabetics

Study has implications for lowering heart-disease risk in Type 2 diabetes patients A drug used widely as an insulin sensitizer appears also to have a significant anti-inflammatory effect in diabetics, a property that could make it useful in helping to prevent heart disease in these patients, a study by endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo has found. Results of the research, involving the drug rosiglitazone, were presented here today (June 15, 2002) at the annual mee 17.06.2002 | nachricht Read more

Novel use of radiotracer reveals extent of mycoardial infarction damage

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Researchers identify gene for most common paediatric malignant brain tumour

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Thought-Controlled Prosthetics?

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Urine test predicts Alzheimer’s disease

A simple clinical test could make it easier to track and treat Alzheimer’s A urine sample taken at the doctor’s office can be the step in determining your chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. They have determined that a urine test can reliably detect free radical damage associated with people with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) – a recognized precursor to AD. The test detects isop 14.06.2002 | nachricht Read more
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