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Earthquakes and climate change - is there a correlation?

The earth is changing. Those interested in understanding what role topography and climate change play with respect to earthquakes and other changes can learn more by reading innovations-report.

Climate change is receiving a lot of attention in the media. What causes climate change? Is climate change a natural process or is it created by man? What can be done to tackle climate change and how does the topography of the earth change as a result of climate change? These and many other questions are the focus of research activities by numerous scientists who are studying the effects of earthquakes, climate change and topography . The earth is not only our domicile. It also provides all of the resources we need. These resources can be negatively impacted by climate change and a changing topography however. Limiting or even impeding the impact of climate change are medium and long term goals of research in this area.

Sensing earthquakes around the world

The aim of earthquake and topography research is the implementation of new technologies that can predict the occurrence of such earthquakes, particularly severe earthquakes that can have immense consequences. Those interested can read the latest reports and news on the subject of earthquakes and topography to better understand how much progress is being made in the area of earthquake and topography research and why earthquakes and tremors can be measured not only locally, but also on the other side of the globe. While earthquakes can be a consequence of the topography, in turn they can also have an impact on the topography itself. innovations-report contains a wide range of insightful articles on the subject of earthquakes and topography that can also help one understand the interactions between earthquakes and topography.

The probability of earthquakes appears to be increasing, and with it changes to the earth's topography. innovations-report continuously publishes new information in the form of reports that cover issues such as whether climate change might play a role or if these are incidents that can't be controlled by man, or whether an early-warning detection system for earthquakes based on topology monitoring is really feasible to allow authorities to warn the public not only minutes, but hours or even days in advance.

From climate change to disaster?

Apart from earthquakes and topography, the subject of climate change and its impact on flora, fauna, man and the earth's topography are the focus of research activities and public discourse. Scientists and researchers are gathering at numerous international conferences to discuss the issue of impeding or limiting climate change in order to safeguard existing habitats and the earth's topography. While some experts are preaching that climate change is uncontainable, others assume that climate change is a natural cycle. Still others are calling for the industrial nations to immediately capitulate with respect to CO2 emissions as a means to contain climate change. innovations-reports offers readers various viewpoints with respect to climate change and its impact on the environment. innovations-report also continuously publishes new opinions from researchers and scientists on the subject of climate change, as well as findings from the fields of earthquake and topography research.

Stay up-to-date on the subjects of climate change, earthquake research and topology

innovations-report.com provides always up-to-date earth sciences reports covering climate change, earthquakes and topography. In order to supply readers with the latest substantiated scientific information, innovations-report continuously updates abstracts from research papers or press releases on the subject of earthquakes, climate change and topography .

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Latest News:

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Flickering sun switched climate

A solar slump may have chilled the Northern Hemisphere. The flickering sun may cause rapid climate change, according to a new comparison of climate records. A 200-year cold snap 10, 300 years ago seems to have coincided with a passing slump in the sun’s activity 1 . Svante Bjorck of Lund University in Sweden and colleagues looked at sediments in Lake Starvatn on the Faroe Islands and in the Norwegian Sea, the width of growth rings in ancient German pine trees 19.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

Residual Volcanic Heat May Be Melting Greenland Ice

Residual heat from volcanic activity may be causing a river of ice to flow in Greenland, a new study indicates. Geologists have found that the region directly above a stream of relatively fast moving ice is thinner than a simple model of glacier change would predict. This observation, described in a report published today in the journal Science, may help researchers pin down the contribution ice sheets have made to sea level changes. Glaciers are built up from layers of fused snow that spr 17.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

Warming May Increase Risk Of Sudden Climate Change

Most climate change research has focused on gradual changes, such as the processes by which emissions of greenhouse gases lead to warming of the planet. But new evidence shows that periods of gradual change in Earth’s past were punctuated by episodes of abrupt change, including temperature changes of about 10 degrees Celsius, or 18 degrees Fahrenheit, in only a decade in some places. Severe floods and droughts also marked periods of abrupt change. A new report from the Nati 14.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

Broken seesaw warms North

American Geophysical Society Meeting, San Francisco, December 2001 Pressure system secrets could help long range forecasts. The rise in levels of greenhouse gases has halted an oscillation of air pressures over the Arctic, bringing warmer, wetter winters to Northern Europe, Siberia and Alaska. The shift could get worse with increasing CO2 emissions, delegates heard this week at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, California. The trend is unlikel 13.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

New Data Kicks Up ’Snowball Earth’ Fight

In 1998, Paul F. Hoffman and Daniel P. Schrag at Harvard University put forth a chilling description of earth’s climate some 650 million years ago. Their theory, dubbed snowball earth, held that between 750 million and 580 million years ago, ice repeatedly enveloped our planet, coating the seas from pole to pole and killing off early life almost completely. During the past few years, the idea has stirred up a great deal of debate. And new data published in the December issue of Geology only furt 05.12.2001 | nachricht Read more

Study Shows Massive Magma Chamber Lies Beneath Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius, the volcano most famous for blanketing the towns of Pompei and Herculaneum with lava and debris in 79 A.D., may be sitting atop a reservoir of magma that covers more than 400 square kilometers, a new study suggests. The finding, reported in the current issue of the journal Science by a group of Italian and French scientists, may lead to more accurate monitoring of the area surrounding the volcano. Building on previous work that suggested the presence of a magma zone underne 19.11.2001 | nachricht Read more

Salt holds samples of ancient seas

Water trapped for millions of years gives a glimpse of oceans’ turbulent past. Drops of sea water entombed within salt crystals millions of years ago are giving researchers a glimpse of ancient oceans. The water, trapped during evaporation, reveals that the seas have seen large chemical changes during their history. "The consensus had been that sea-water chemistry hadn’t changed that much over the past 600 million years," says geochemist Juske Horita of Oak Ridge National La 02.11.2001 | nachricht Read more

Melt down

Half a century of thinning ice leaves Greenland’s future looking wet. There is new evidence that the Greenland ice pack is in retreat. The finding may be a foretaste of still more rapid melting, and in turn, rising sea levels. The ice sheet over northwest Greenland has thinned by 10-15 cm a year over the past 40 years, two scientists calculate 1 . The trend indicates "a significant long-term thinning", says one, Niels Reeh, of the Technical University of 01.11.2001 | nachricht Read more

Floods forecast for Bangladesh

With a weather monitoring network a new model could predict coastal floods in Bangladesh. A new model should help forecast the massive floods to which the northern coast of Bangladesh is prone 1 . In principle, the model can predict the heights and arrival times of the huge waves that cyclones cause, and so could improve the planning of sea defences. The effectiveness of the model will depend on the availability of accurate, timely and detailed meteorological data, ca 31.10.2001 | nachricht Read more

Storms lower ozone levels

Ozone miniholes over the North Atlantic follow the unsteady pulse of climate fluctuations. Recurring fluctuations in the North Atlantic climate are punching miniholes in the ozone layer, exposing Scandinavia and northern Europe to higher levels of ultraviolet radiation than normal, say two climatologists. Seesawing air pressure over Greenland and the subtropical north Atlantic Ocean stirs the atmosphere and wafts ozone-depleted air towards populated high-latitude regions in 29.10.2001 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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