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Earthquakes and climate change - is there a correlation?

The earth is changing. Those interested in understanding what role topography and climate change play with respect to earthquakes and other changes can learn more by reading innovations-report.

Climate change is receiving a lot of attention in the media. What causes climate change? Is climate change a natural process or is it created by man? What can be done to tackle climate change and how does the topography of the earth change as a result of climate change? These and many other questions are the focus of research activities by numerous scientists who are studying the effects of earthquakes, climate change and topography . The earth is not only our domicile. It also provides all of the resources we need. These resources can be negatively impacted by climate change and a changing topography however. Limiting or even impeding the impact of climate change are medium and long term goals of research in this area.

Sensing earthquakes around the world

The aim of earthquake and topography research is the implementation of new technologies that can predict the occurrence of such earthquakes, particularly severe earthquakes that can have immense consequences. Those interested can read the latest reports and news on the subject of earthquakes and topography to better understand how much progress is being made in the area of earthquake and topography research and why earthquakes and tremors can be measured not only locally, but also on the other side of the globe. While earthquakes can be a consequence of the topography, in turn they can also have an impact on the topography itself. innovations-report contains a wide range of insightful articles on the subject of earthquakes and topography that can also help one understand the interactions between earthquakes and topography.

The probability of earthquakes appears to be increasing, and with it changes to the earth's topography. innovations-report continuously publishes new information in the form of reports that cover issues such as whether climate change might play a role or if these are incidents that can't be controlled by man, or whether an early-warning detection system for earthquakes based on topology monitoring is really feasible to allow authorities to warn the public not only minutes, but hours or even days in advance.

From climate change to disaster?

Apart from earthquakes and topography, the subject of climate change and its impact on flora, fauna, man and the earth's topography are the focus of research activities and public discourse. Scientists and researchers are gathering at numerous international conferences to discuss the issue of impeding or limiting climate change in order to safeguard existing habitats and the earth's topography. While some experts are preaching that climate change is uncontainable, others assume that climate change is a natural cycle. Still others are calling for the industrial nations to immediately capitulate with respect to CO2 emissions as a means to contain climate change. innovations-reports offers readers various viewpoints with respect to climate change and its impact on the environment. innovations-report also continuously publishes new opinions from researchers and scientists on the subject of climate change, as well as findings from the fields of earthquake and topography research.

Stay up-to-date on the subjects of climate change, earthquake research and topology

innovations-report.com provides always up-to-date earth sciences reports covering climate change, earthquakes and topography. In order to supply readers with the latest substantiated scientific information, innovations-report continuously updates abstracts from research papers or press releases on the subject of earthquakes, climate change and topography .

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Latest News:

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Increasingly salty Mediterranean favors ice sheet growth

About 150,000 years ago, an anomalous ice age was triggered by an increasingly salty Mediterranean Sea, a development that’s occurring today and may start new ice sheet growth in the next few decades, according to a study at the University of Minnesota. Robert Johnson, an adjunct professor of geology and geophysics, will present his study of the glaciation 150,000 years ago and discuss its implications for today’s climate on Tuesday, Oct. 29, at the annual meeting of the Geological Society 25.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Land subsidence measurements may improve groundwater management

Geological sciences researchers at Virginia Tech are using GPS antennas to measure aquifer use and storage capacity. At the Geological Society of America’s 114th annual meeting in Denver, Oct. 27-30, master’s degree student Sandra Warner will make the case for the broader coverage of such tools. Warner and Virginia Tech geological sciences professor Thomas Burbey are conducting a large-scale aquifer test on a new municipal well in the Virgin River Valley near Mesquite, Nev. In add 25.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Better weather predictions in an avalanche of data

Sometimes getting too much of a good thing may create more problems than not getting enough - especially when it comes to the weather. Just ask Texas A&M University atmospheric scientist Fuqing Zhang, whose ensemble weather forecasting research is burdened with trillions of bytes of real-time data. Zhang’s quest, funded by a National Science Foundation grant of $295,500, is to find the best way to assimilate the most recent weather observation data for input into the latest computer fo 24.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

New map shows human ’footprint’ covers most of the Earth

But scientists say human effects can be a positive, not negative, factor for life on earth Human beings now directly influence more than three quarters of the earth’s landmass, according to a state-of-the-art map of the world produced by a team of scientists from the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Published in the latest issue of the scientific journal BioScienc 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Great Progress Made by Seismologists in Identifying Violations of Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

Advances in detection devices and methods of analysis have allowed seismologists to identify virtually all events that might be nuclear explosions of possible military significance under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), according to Prof. Lynn R. Sykes of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Writing in the 29 October issue of Eos, published by the American Geophysical Union, Sykes analyzes 72 questionable events since 1960. Verification was a major issue in 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

International scholars assess mysterious scroll found in mummy

During the second century B.C., a mummy-maker took a scroll of poetry and used it as stuffing for a corpse. The roll of papyrus remained hidden inside the mummy’s chest cavity until its rediscovery in the early 1990s. Today, what was once treated like trash survives as the oldest surviving example of a Greek poetry book, as well as an important source of information about the past. To glean as many clues from this ancient scroll as possible, the University of Cincinnati Department of Class 23.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Giants joust in the cold

A new giant was born recently in the coastal waters of Antarctica. A series of images captured from May through the beginning of this month by ESA`s Envisat satellite shows the subsequent duel between the new iceberg and another as it breaks free of the Ross Ice Shelf and tries to move north. Christened C-19 by the US National Ice Centre in Maryland, the new iceberg measured 200 x 32 km, and about 200 m thick. As seen in the accompanying animation of images acquired by Envi 22.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Key to the Nature of Earth’s Mysterious Core Found Beneath Arctic Ice

In the high Canadian Arctic, researchers at the University of Rochester have stripped away some of the mystery surrounding the powerhouse that drives the Earth’s magnetic field. The research strongly suggests that several of the characteristics of the field that were long thought to operate independently of one another, such as the field’s polarity and strength, may be linked. If so, then the strength of the field, which has been waning for several thousand years, may herald a pole reversal 17.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Melting crust makes rich gold, copper deposits

A U of T study suggests why giant gold and copper deposits are found at some volcanoes but not others, a finding that could point prospectors to large deposits of this and other valuable metals. “There’s one characteristic that is common to all of these big gold and copper deposits anywhere in the world,” says Professor James Mungall of the Department of Geology. The ocean’s crust that is pushed down under a volcano can start to melt, which it doesn’t normally do. His study, which appea 16.10.2002 | nachricht Read more

Purdue scientist adds third dimension to earth beneath our feet

The swirl of malleable rock in the earth’s mantle – located between the earth’s crust and core – may have greater effect on the earth’s surface than was once believed, a Purdue research team reports. Using computer technology to create three-dimensional models of the earth’s mantle, Purdue’s Scott King has found evidence that some dramatic features of the earth’s surface could be the result of relatively rapid shifts in the direction in which crustal plat 15.10.2002 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

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