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Earthquakes and climate change - is there a correlation?

The earth is changing. Those interested in understanding what role topography and climate change play with respect to earthquakes and other changes can learn more by reading innovations-report.

Climate change is receiving a lot of attention in the media. What causes climate change? Is climate change a natural process or is it created by man? What can be done to tackle climate change and how does the topography of the earth change as a result of climate change? These and many other questions are the focus of research activities by numerous scientists who are studying the effects of earthquakes, climate change and topography . The earth is not only our domicile. It also provides all of the resources we need. These resources can be negatively impacted by climate change and a changing topography however. Limiting or even impeding the impact of climate change are medium and long term goals of research in this area.

Sensing earthquakes around the world

The aim of earthquake and topography research is the implementation of new technologies that can predict the occurrence of such earthquakes, particularly severe earthquakes that can have immense consequences. Those interested can read the latest reports and news on the subject of earthquakes and topography to better understand how much progress is being made in the area of earthquake and topography research and why earthquakes and tremors can be measured not only locally, but also on the other side of the globe. While earthquakes can be a consequence of the topography, in turn they can also have an impact on the topography itself. innovations-report contains a wide range of insightful articles on the subject of earthquakes and topography that can also help one understand the interactions between earthquakes and topography.

The probability of earthquakes appears to be increasing, and with it changes to the earth's topography. innovations-report continuously publishes new information in the form of reports that cover issues such as whether climate change might play a role or if these are incidents that can't be controlled by man, or whether an early-warning detection system for earthquakes based on topology monitoring is really feasible to allow authorities to warn the public not only minutes, but hours or even days in advance.

From climate change to disaster?

Apart from earthquakes and topography, the subject of climate change and its impact on flora, fauna, man and the earth's topography are the focus of research activities and public discourse. Scientists and researchers are gathering at numerous international conferences to discuss the issue of impeding or limiting climate change in order to safeguard existing habitats and the earth's topography. While some experts are preaching that climate change is uncontainable, others assume that climate change is a natural cycle. Still others are calling for the industrial nations to immediately capitulate with respect to CO2 emissions as a means to contain climate change. innovations-reports offers readers various viewpoints with respect to climate change and its impact on the environment. innovations-report also continuously publishes new opinions from researchers and scientists on the subject of climate change, as well as findings from the fields of earthquake and topography research.

Stay up-to-date on the subjects of climate change, earthquake research and topology provides always up-to-date earth sciences reports covering climate change, earthquakes and topography. In order to supply readers with the latest substantiated scientific information, innovations-report continuously updates abstracts from research papers or press releases on the subject of earthquakes, climate change and topography .

Earth Sciences

Earth Sciences (also referred to as Geosciences), which deals with basic issues surrounding our planet, plays a vital role in the area of energy and raw materials supply.

Earth Sciences comprises subjects such as geology, geography, geological informatics, paleontology, mineralogy, petrography, crystallography, geophysics, geodesy, glaciology, cartography, photogrammetry, meteorology and seismology, early-warning systems, earthquake research and polar research.

Latest News:

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NASA provides an infrared look at Hurricane Joaquin over time

A series of NASA infrared images of Hurricane Joaquin from October 1 to 6 show the development and movement of the storm, and its moisture stream into South Carolina.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, which circles the Earth twice a day. AIRS gathers temperature data...

08.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

Ancient rocks record first evidence for photosynthesis that made oxygen

A new study shows that iron-bearing rocks that formed at the ocean floor 3.2 billion years ago carry unmistakable evidence of oxygen. The only logical source for that oxygen is the earliest known example of photosynthesis by living organisms, say University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscientists.

"Rock from 3.4 billion years ago showed that the ocean contained basically no free oxygen," says Clark Johnson, professor of geoscience at UW-Madison and a...

07.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

Distinguishing coincidence from causality: connections in the climate system

Detecting how changes in one spot on Earth – in temperature, rain, wind – are linked to changes in another, far away area is key to assessing climate risks. Scientists now developed a new technique of finding out if one change can cause another change or not, and which regions are important gateways for such teleconnections. They use advanced mathematical tools for an unprecedented analysis of data from thousands of air pressure measurements.

The method now published in Nature Communications can be applied to assess geoengineering impacts as well as global effects of local extreme weather events,...

07.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

A simpler way to estimate the feedback between permafrost carbon and climate

Berkeley Lab scientist leads effort to shed light on a potentially huge player in the planet's climate

One of the big unknowns in predicting climate change is the billions of tons of carbon frozen in Arctic permafrost. As global warming causes soil temperatures...

06.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

The warmer the higher: sea-level rise from Filchner-Ronne ice in Antarctica

The more ice is melted of the Antarctic Filchner-Ronne shelf, the more ice flows into the ocean and the more the region contributes to global sea-level rise. While this might seem obvious, it is no matter of course for the huge ice masses of Antarctica: parts of the ice continent are characterized by instabilities that, once triggered, can lead to persistent ice discharge into the ocean even without a further increase of warming - resulting in unstoppable long-term sea-level rise. In the Filchner-Ronne region however, ice-loss will likely not show such behavior, scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research now found.

Published in Nature Climate Change, their study shows that in this area the ice flow into the ocean increases just constantly with the heat provided by the...

06.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

Satellites show Joaquin becoming a Category 4 hurricane

Hurricane Joaquin had become a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale by 2 p.m. EDT on October 1. At NASA, satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite was compiled into an animation that showed the hurricane strengthening. Earlier in the day, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw powerful thunderstorms within, indicating further strengthening.

The GOES-East satellite is managed by NOAA, and at NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, imagery from GOES-East...

02.10.2015 | nachricht Read more

Surface of the oceans affects climate more than thought

The oceans seem to produce significantly more isoprene, and consequently affect stronger the climate than previously thought. This emerges from a study by the Institute of Catalysis and Environment in Lyon (IRCELYON, CNRS / University Lyon 1) and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), which had studied samples of the surface film in the laboratory. The results underline the global significance of the chemical processes at the border between ocean and atmosphere, write the researchers in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Isoprene is a gas that is formed by both the vegetation and the oceans. It is very important for the climate because this gas can form particles that can...

30.09.2015 | nachricht Read more

Monsoon mission: A better way to predict Indian weather?

To better understand global weather patterns and increase scientific collaboration between the U.S. and India, researchers supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) have completed a month-long cruise studying summer monsoon conditions in the Bay of Bengal.

Summer, or southwest, monsoons are moisture-soaked seasonal winds that bring critical rainfall to the Indian subcontinent during the June-September wet season....

29.09.2015 | nachricht Read more

Curbing short-lived pollutants – a win-win for climate and air quality

Ozone, methane and aerosols (tiny pollutant particles) remain in the atmosphere for a shorter time than CO2, but can affect both the climate and air quality. Yet environmental policies tend to separate the two issues, with measures that fight air pollution not always bringing climate benefits and vice-versa. A new study looking into short-lived pollutants reveals measures governments could implement to substantially improve air quality as well as fight climate change. The results, by a team of scientists from around Europe and China, are published today (24 September) in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

In the EU, the reduction in life expectancy due to air pollution was 7.5 months in 2010, and legislation already in place to improve air quality aims to reduce...

24.09.2015 | nachricht Read more

New Geosphere themed issue: The anatomy of rifting

Research at continental rifts, mid-ocean ridges, and transforms has shown that new plates are created by extensional tectonics, magma intrusion, and volcanism.

Studies of a wide variety of extensional processes, ranging from plate thinning to magma intrusion, have helped scientists understand how continents are broken...

23.09.2015 | nachricht Read more
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Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Kick-off for a new era of precision astronomy

The MICADO camera, a first light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), has entered a new phase in the project: by agreeing to a Memorandum of Understanding, the partners in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Austria, and Italy, have all confirmed their participation. Following this milestone, the project's transition into its preliminary design phase was approved at a kick-off meeting held in Vienna. Two weeks earlier, on September 18, the consortium and the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which is building the telescope, have signed the corresponding collaboration agreement.

As the first dedicated camera for the E-ELT, MICADO will equip the giant telescope with a capability for diffraction-limited imaging at near-infrared...

Im Focus: Locusts at the wheel: University of Graz investigates collision detector inspired by insect eyes

Self-driving cars will be on our streets in the foreseeable future. In Graz, research is currently dedicated to an innovative driver assistance system that takes over control if there is a danger of collision. It was nature that inspired Dr Manfred Hartbauer from the Institute of Zoology at the University of Graz: in dangerous traffic situations, migratory locusts react around ten times faster than humans. Working together with an interdisciplinary team, Hartbauer is investigating an affordable collision detector that is equipped with artificial locust eyes and can recognise potential crashes in time, during both day and night.

Inspired by insects

Im Focus: Physicists shrink particle accelerator

Prototype demonstrates feasibility of building terahertz accelerators

An interdisciplinary team of researchers has built the first prototype of a miniature particle accelerator that uses terahertz radiation instead of radio...

Im Focus: Simple detection of magnetic skyrmions

New physical effect: researchers discover a change of electrical resistance in magnetic whirls

At present, tiny magnetic whirls – so called skyrmions – are discussed as promising candidates for bits in future robust and compact data storage devices. At...

Im Focus: High-speed march through a layer of graphene

In cooperation with the Center for Nano-Optics of Georgia State University in Atlanta (USA), scientists of the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics of the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität have made simulations of the processes that happen when a layer of carbon atoms is irradiated with strong laser light.

Electrons hit by strong laser pulses change their location on ultrashort timescales, i.e. within a couple of attoseconds (1 as = 10 to the minus 18 sec). In...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



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