Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Farmers more likely to be green if they talk to their neighbors

28.07.2011
Besides helping each other plant and harvest, rural Chinese neighbors also influence each other’s environmental behavior – farmers are more likely to reenroll their land in a conservation program if they talk to their neighbors about it.

Scientists from the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability at Michigan State University used a simulation model to study the amount of land farmers in the Wolong Nature Reserve in southwestern China reenrolled in the Grain-to-Green Program (GTGP), which aims to reduce soil erosion by converting sloping cropland to forest or grassland. Farmers receive an annual payment of either 5,000 pounds of grain or $498 for each 2.5 acres enrolled in the program. In 2005, this was about 8 percent of the farmers’ income.

“To achieve global environmental sustainability, it is important to go beyond traditional economic and regulatory approaches,” said Jianguo "Jack" Liu, center director and a co-author on the paper. Liu holds the Rachel Carson Chair in Sustainability at MSU.

Xiaodong Chen, who conducted the research while working on his doctorate at MSU, and colleagues found that if farmers had the opportunity to interact with each other, they were willing to reenroll their land in the GTGP. And the more times they interacted, the more land was reenrolled.

The study is published online in the journal Ecological Modeling.

“When people talked to each other, they learned of the others’ decisions and were more likely to reenroll their land at the same payment,” said Chen, now assistant professor of geography at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. “More than 15 percent more land was reenrolled when people had 10 interactions with their neighbors. With three interactions, 7.5 percent more land was reenrolled. The study shows that if people interact, it improves the efficiency of the program and is good for the environment.”

The research builds on earlier findings by Liu and Chen showing that employed people in larger Chinese cities were more likely to adopt environmental behaviors, such as separating recyclables from trash, recycling plastic bags or participating in environmental education programs.

“One of the possible reasons urban Chinese who have jobs tend to be more green-minded is because people's environmental behavior may be affected by other people's environmental behavior in their working environment,” Chen explained. In the Wolong Nature Reserve, we found that people's participation in the GTGP also is definitely affected by their neighbors' behavior.”

The Wolong Nature Reserve is home to several thousand species of plants and animals, including the endangered giant panda.

“The GTGP takes advantage of the general trend of rural-to-urban migration in China,” Chen added. “People want to work off-farm, but they don’t want to give up their land. Grain-to-Green allows them to do that and still get some income from the land. We found that if they talked to their neighbors, most people would actually leave the land in the program even if the payments stopped.”

In addition to Liu and Chen, other study authors are Frank Lupi, MSU professor of environmental and natural resources economics and fisheries and wildlife; Andrés Viña, MSU research specialist; Li An, of San Diego State University; and Ryan Sheely, of Harvard University. Lupi and Vina are also CSIS members.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, NASA, the National Institutes of Health, the MSU Environmental Research Initiative, MSU AgBioResearch, and the Giorgio Ruffolo Fellowship in Sustainability Science at Harvard University.

Contact:

Jamie DePolo
Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability
depolo@msu.edu

Jamie DePolo | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.msu.edu

More articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science:

nachricht Climate change: Trade liberalization could buffer economic losses in agriculture
25.08.2016 | Potsdam-Institut für Klimafolgenforschung

nachricht Fungal intruder ante portas!
19.08.2016 | Leibniz-Institut für Pflanzengenetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

All articles from Agricultural and Forestry Science >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

Im Focus: X-ray optics on a chip

Waveguides are widely used for filtering, confining, guiding, coupling or splitting beams of visible light. However, creating waveguides that could do the same for X-rays has posed tremendous challenges in fabrication, so they are still only in an early stage of development.

In the latest issue of Acta Crystallographica Section A: Foundations and Advances , Sarah Hoffmann-Urlaub and Tim Salditt report the fabrication and testing of...

Im Focus: Piggyback battery for microchips: TU Graz researchers develop new battery concept

Electrochemists at TU Graz have managed to use monocrystalline semiconductor silicon as an active storage electrode in lithium batteries. This enables an integrated power supply to be made for microchips with a rechargeable battery.

Small electrical gadgets, such as mobile phones, tablets or notebooks, are indispensable accompaniments of everyday life. Integrated circuits in the interiors...

Im Focus: UCI physicists confirm possible discovery of fifth force of nature

Light particle could be key to understanding dark matter in universe

Recent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according...

Im Focus: Wi-fi from lasers

White light from lasers demonstrates data speeds of up to 2 GB/s

A nanocrystalline material that rapidly makes white light out of blue light has been developed by KAUST researchers.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

The energy transition is not possible without Geotechnics

25.08.2016 | Event News

New Ideas for the Shipping Industry

24.08.2016 | Event News

A week of excellence: 22 of the world’s best computer scientists and mathematicians in Heidelberg

12.08.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Spherical tokamak as model for next steps in fusion energy

25.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists identify spark plug that ignites nerve cell demise in ALS

25.08.2016 | Health and Medicine

Secure networks for the Internet of the future

25.08.2016 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>