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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 239,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 239,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.


Im Focus: Climate study finds evidence of global shift in the 1980s

Planet Earth experienced a global climate shift in the late 1980s on an unprecedented scale, fuelled by anthropogenic warming and a volcanic eruption, according to new research published this week.

Scientists say that a major step change, or ‘regime shift’, in the Earth’s biophysical systems, from the upper atmosphere to the depths of the ocean and from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Two decades of training students and experts in tracking infectious disease

Two decades of training students and experts at University of Tampere - although PhD Ralf Reintjes, Professor for Epidemiology and Surveillance at Hamburg University of Applied Sciences (Germany) - in tracking infectious disease outbreaks: Infectious diseases have never respected national boundaries and are increasingly important challenges to health globally. Experience over recent years has shown time and time again that epidemics and pandemics affect people worldwide. How best to understand, manage and prevent them is the task of disease detectives (epidemiologists) and infection control experts. When disease outbreaks strike, epidemiologists are first on the scene.

Students and experts from all over the world - the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany, participants too - have been trained in this field of...

27.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Coming to a monitor near you: A defect-free, molecule-thick film

An emerging class of atomically thin materials known as monolayer semiconductors has generated a great deal of buzz in the world of materials science. Monolayers hold promise in the development of transparent LED displays, ultra-high efficiency solar cells, photo detectors and nanoscale transistors. Their downside? The films are notoriously riddled with defects, killing their performance.

But now a research team, led by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has found a simple way to fix...

27.11.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Increased carbon dioxide enhances plankton growth, opposite of what was expected

Science study reports that coccolithophores' abundance has increased by an order of magnitude since 1960s, significantly changing ocean garden

Coccolithophores--tiny calcifying plants that are part of the foundation of the marine food web--have been increasing in relative abundance in the North...

27.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Graphene microphone outperforms traditional nickel and offers ultrasonic reach

Scientists have developed a graphene based microphone nearly 32 times more sensitive than microphones of standard nickel-based construction.

The researchers, based at the University of Belgrade, Serbia, created a vibrating membrane - the part of a condenser microphone which converts the sound to a...

27.11.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Rapid plankton growth in ocean seen as sign of carbon dioxide loading

Johns Hopkins scientist leads effort suggesting faster ecosystem change than predicted

A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result...

27.11.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Don't forget plankton in climate change models, says study

A new study from the University of Exeter, published in the journal Ecology Letters, found that phytoplankton -- microscopic water-borne plants -- can rapidly evolve tolerance to elevated water temperatures

A new study from the University of Exeter, published in the journal Ecology Letters, found that phytoplankton - microscopic water-borne plants - can rapidly...

27.11.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Controlling Electromagnetic Radiation by Graphene

An international team of scientists from the University of Exeter, UK, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ), Switzerland, and the University of Augsburg has demonstrated how the extraordinary properties of graphene can be exploited to create artificial structures that can be used to control and manipulate electromagnetic radiation over a wide range of wavelengths.

A collaborative international team consisting of two experimental groups, led by Professor Geoffrey Nash from the University of Exeter and Professor Jérôme...

27.11.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New and presumably tick-borne bacterium discovered in an Austrian fox

Ticks can transmit various diseases to people and animals. Some well-known diseases spread by ticks include tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and Lyme disease. Researchers at the Vetmeduni Vienna are hot on the trail of pathogens carried by ticks. The parasitologists recently discovered a new form of the bacterium Candidatus Neoehrlichia in a red fox from the Austrian state of Vorarlberg. The pathogen might also be transmittable to humans. The results were published in the journal Parasites & Vectors.

Adnan Hodžić from the Institute of Parasitology at the Vetmeduni Vienna is searching for pathogens transmitted by ticks. He is especially interested in wild...

27.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Using sphere packing models to explain the structure of forests

Explaining the complex structure of tropical forests is one of the great challenges in ecology. An issue of special interest is the distribution of different sizes of trees, something which is of particular relevance for biomass estimates. Modellers from the UFZ, working together with research partners, has now developed a new method which can be used to explain the tree size distribution in natural forests. To do so, the scientists use principles from stochastic geometry, as they have reported in a contribution to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS, Early Edition).

For over one hundred years, the distribution of different sizes of trees in forests has been one of the core attributes recorded by foresters and ecologists...

26.11.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Dimensionality transition in a newly created material

Iron oxides occur in nature in many forms, often significantly different from each other in terms of structure and physical properties. However, a new variety of iron oxide, recently created and tested by scientists in Cracow, surprised both physicists and engineers, as it revealed features previously unobserved in any other material.

The new form of iron oxide (FeO) is a metallic crystal with virtually no defects, a unique conglomerate of electrical and magnetic characteristics, and atoms...

26.11.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Revealing glacier flow with animated satellite images

Frank Paul, a glaciologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, has created animations from satellite images of the Karakoram mountain range in Asia to show how its glaciers flow and change. The images of four different regions compress 25 years of glacier changes into just one second, revealing the complex glacier behaviour in the Karakoram. The animations are published today (26 November) in The Cryosphere, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

The new animations reveal glacier flow and changes over a much longer time period and at a much larger scale than ever before, using the Karakoram as an...

26.11.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Molecular trigger for Cerebral Cavernous Malformation identified

Researchers in Italy, Germany and the United States have identified a regulatory protein crucial for the development of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation – a severe and incurable disease mainly affecting the brain microvasculature. The results, which are published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, show that the KLF4 protein plays a central role in the development of CCM lesions.

Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) is caused by mutations in the CCM1, CCM2 or CCM3 genes, and is characterized by vascular lesions that can lead to...

26.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How a genetic locus protects adult blood-forming stem cells

A particular location in DNA, called the Dlk1-Gtl2 locus, plays a critical role in protecting hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells--a discovery revealing a critical role of metabolic control in adult stem cells, and providing insight for potentially diagnosing and treating cancer, according to researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research.

In their study, published online Nov. 25 in Cell Stem Cell, Stowers Investigator Linheng Li, Ph.D., and first author Pengxu Qian, Ph.D., along with other...

26.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stanford technology makes metal wires on solar cells nearly invisible to light

A solar cell is basically a semiconductor, which converts sunlight into electricity, sandwiched between metal contacts that carry the electrical current.

But this widely used design has a flaw: The shiny metal on top of the cell actually reflects sunlight away from the semiconductor where electricity is...

26.11.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Peering into cell structures where neurodiseases emerge

PeeriMagic-angle-spinning NMR used to probe protein/microtubule assembly at atomic scale

A latticework of tiny tubes called microtubules gives your cells their shape and also acts like a railroad track that essential proteins travel on. But if...

26.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

ARTORG and Inselspital develop artificial pancreas

Artificial pancreas devices so far cannot compensate the daily varying food intake or physical activities of diabetes patients. The University of Bern, the Bern University Hospital and an industry partner have therefore set out to develop a more flexible device to continuously control patients’ blood sugar.

"Today, a diabetic patient must follow a very constraining therapy with many blood glucose measurements, dose calculations and insulin injections. The ideal...

26.11.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Hospital energy centre connected with heating network

Working in conjunction with Giessen’s municipal utility company, Giessen and Marburg University Hospital has become the first German hospital to integrate its energy centre into an urban district heating network. The core of the combined cooling, heating and power plant is provided by four cogeneration modules that produce electricity and heat. The BINE Projektinfo brochure 12/2015 “Energy centre supplies Giessen University Hospital” describes the initial operating experiences.

The newly developed trigeneration plant reduces CO2 by around a third

26.11.2015 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

Antibody-Drug Compounds and Immunotherapy to Treat Breast Cancer

To more efficiently treat breast cancer, scientists have been researching molecules that selectively bind to cancer cells and deliver a substance that can kill the tumor cells, for several years. Researchers from the University and University Hospital Basel have now for the first time successfully combined such an antibody-drug conjugate with a therapy that stimulates the immune system to attack tumor cells. This opens the door to new therapeutic options in the treatment of breast cancer, report the researchers in the scientific journal Science Translational Medicine.

In nearly every fifth breast cancer patient, an above-average number of HER2 receptors are located on the surface of the tumor cells. These receptors are...

26.11.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Get to the point with electric cars

New process for accurate positioning to the nearest centimeter with inductive charging systems

Electric vehicles are increasingly no longer charged with electricity by cords but by means of inductive charging systems. Charging takes place via a magnetic...

26.11.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Harnessing a peptide holds promise for increasing crop yields without more fertilizer

UMass Amherst researchers identify a key molecule in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

Molecular biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who study nitrogen-fixing bacteria in plants have discovered a "double agent" peptide in an...

25.11.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Earth's magnetic field is not about to flip

New measurements show recent intensity shift trending back to average

The intensity of earth's magnetic field has been weakening in the last couple of hundred years, leading some scientists to think that its polarity might be...

25.11.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tracking down the 'missing' carbon from the Martian atmosphere

Caltech and JPL scientists suggest the fingerprints of early photochemistry provide a solution to the long-standing mystery

Mars is blanketed by a thin, mostly carbon dioxide atmosphere--one that is far too thin to prevent large amounts of water on the surface of the planet from...

25.11.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Autumn gales again drive salt into the Baltic: Third Major Baltic Inflow within 1.5 years.

From November 14 – 22, huge amounts of North Sea waters rich in oxygen entered the Baltic Sea again. It was a series of 12 storm fronts passing the Baltic Sea region since the beginning of November, which had triggered this event. According to first calculations a water volume of 76 km³ with a salt content of 17-22 g/kg passed the narrow and shallow Western Baltic Sea during the main inflow period. This sums up to approximately 1.4 giga-tons of salt being transported into the Baltic. Such an event can be classified as a Major Baltic Inflow of moderate intensity. Currently, this water mass can be traced in a water depth of 45-25 m in the Arkona Basin.

According to first calculations a water volume of 76 km³ with a salt content of 17-22 g/kg passed the narrow and shallow Western Baltic Sea during the main...

25.11.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more



Event News

Fraunhofer’s Urban Futures Conference: 2 days in the city of the future

25.11.2015 | Event News

Gluten oder nicht Gluten? Überempfindlichkeit auf Weizen kann unterschiedliche Ursachen haben

17.11.2015 | Event News

Art Collection Deutsche Börse zeigt Ausstellung „Traces of Disorder“

21.10.2015 | Event News

Latest News

Siemens to supply 126 megawatts to onshore wind power plants in Scotland

27.11.2015 | Press release

Two decades of training students and experts in tracking infectious disease

27.11.2015 | Life Sciences

Coming to a monitor near you: A defect-free, molecule-thick film

27.11.2015 | Materials Sciences

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