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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 245,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 245,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Closing the carbon loop

Pitt chemical engineering team identifies new catalyst that advances capture and conversion of atmospheric carbon dioxide

Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering focused on developing a new catalyst that would lead to large-scale implementation of...

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

Glasses are amorphous (non-crystalline) solids that are widely used in everyday life and in technological instruments. It is important to understand the behavior of materials that form glasses; that is, to study the dynamics of their glass transition, which is the transition from the liquid state to a glass one with decreasing temperature or increasing pressure.

Multiple theoretical models have been developed to explain the relaxation dynamics of materials that form glasses. One such model is the dynamic facilitation...

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

Up-close, real-time, chemical-sensitive 3-D imaging offers clues for reducing cost/improving performance of catalysts for fuel-cell-powered vehicles and other applications

Catalysts are at the heart of fuel cells-devices that convert hydrogen and oxygen to water and enough electricity to power vehicles for hundreds of miles. But...

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Decoding cement's shape promises greener concrete

Rice University scientists develop 'programmable' cement particles to attain enhanced properties

Bringing order to disorder is key to making stronger and greener cement, the paste that binds concrete.

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Will Earth still exist 5 billion years from now?

Old star offers sneak preview of the future

What will happen to Earth when, in a few billion years' time, the Sun is a hundred times bigger than it is today? Using the most powerful radio telescope in...

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Oxygen can wake up dormant bacteria for antibiotic attacks

Bacterial resistance does not come just through adaptation to antibiotics, sometimes the bacteria simply go to sleep. An international team of researchers is looking at compounds that attack bacteria's ability to go dormant and have found the first oxygen-sensitive toxin antitoxin system.

"Antibiotics can only kill bacteria when they are actively growing and dividing," said Thomas K. Wood, professor of chemical engineering and holder of the...

08.12.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Newly discovered bacteria-binding protein in the intestine

Deficiency in a certain protein in the gastrointestinal tract has been shown to lead to both inflammation and abdominal fat accumulation in mice. The discovery provides yet another piece of the puzzle of how humans are affected — or not — by the large quantities of intestinal bacteria we carry with us.

In the study from Sahlgrenska Academy, researchers have addressed the key role of the bacteria-binding protein ZG16 in protecting the body from intestinal...

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Home computers discover a record-breaking pulsar-neutron star system

Almost 25,000 light years away, two dead stars orbit one another. Each more massive than our Sun, only 20 km in diameter, and less than five hours per orbit.. This unusual pair was discovered by an international team of scientists – including researchers from two MPIs (Gravitational Physics and Radio Astronomy) – and by volunteers from the distributed computing project Einstein@Home. Only 14 similar binary systems are known so far, and the new one also is the most massive of those. Such systems enable some of the most precise tests of Einstein’s theory of general relativity. They also play an important role as potential gravitational-wave sources for the LIGO detectors.

Neutron stars are the highly magnetized and extremely dense remnants of supernova explosions. Like a rapidly rotating cosmic lighthouse they emit beams of...

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Silicon solar cell of ISFH yields 25% efficiency with passivating POLO contacts

The Lower Saxon‘ Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH) achieved a solar cell efficiency of 25 % in collaboration with the Institute of Electronic Materials and Devices (MBE) of the Leibniz Universität Hannover. This high efficiency was accomplished with passivating "poly-Si on oxide" contacts (POLO) for both polarities, which avoid the otherwise high recombination beneath the metal contacts.

The Lower Saxon‘ Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), an affiliated institute of the “Leibniz Universität Hannover” in collaboration with the...

08.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3-D printed lenses

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a new ultrasound device that produces sharper images through 3D...

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

The balancing act: An enzyme that links endocytosis to membrane recycling

All cells have surface membranes, and this membrane is especially important in the light-sensitive cells of the eyes in your body. Within your eyes are millions of photoreceptors - nerve cells that capture light to form images of the world around you. The surface membranes of these nerve cells are packed with rhodopsin, a protein that detects light. These are the light-sensing membranes of the eyes that absorb packets of light to trigger nerves causing the sensation of sight.

Once triggered by light, rhodopsin molecules on the surface membrane must be 'reset' in order to sense light again, a process that occurs within the cell. This...

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How to turn white fat brown

Penn scientists discover a molecular trigger of fat-cell 'browning' program, which could lead to better treatments for obesity and diabetes

A signaling pathway in fat cells may one day provide the key to better treatments for obesity, according to new research by scientists in the Perelman School...

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Predicting unpredictability: Information theory offers new way to read ice cores

At two miles long and five inches in diameter, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS) ice core is a tangible record of the last 68,000 years of our planet's climate.

Completed in 2011, the core is packed with information, but it's also packed with noise and error, making the climate story hard to read. Figuring out whether...

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sea ice hit record lows in November

Unusually high air temperatures and a warm ocean have led to a record low Arctic sea ice extent for November, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. In the Southern Hemisphere, Antarctic sea ice extent also hit a record low for the month, caused by moderately warm temperatures and a rapid shift in circumpolar winds.

"It looks like a triple whammy--a warm ocean, a warm atmosphere, and a wind pattern all working against the ice in the Arctic," said NSIDC director Mark...

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips

A military drone flying on a reconnaissance mission is captured behind enemy lines, setting into motion a team of engineers who need to remotely delete sensitive information carried on the drone's chips. Because the chips are optical and not electronic, the engineers can now simply flash a beam of UV light onto the chip to instantly erase all content. Disaster averted.

This James Bond-esque chip is closer to reality because of a new development in a nanomaterial developed by Yuebing Zheng, a professor of mechanical...

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Hulking hurricanes: Seeking greater accuracy in predicting storm strength

To better predict tropical cyclone intensity, scientists sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) recently worked with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to gather atmospheric data from storms that formed in the Atlantic Ocean in 2016.

Fully developed tropical cyclones -- variously called hurricanes, typhoons or cyclones, depending on their region--can grow as wide as several hundred miles...

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Illinois researchers discover hot hydrogen atoms in Earth's upper atmosphere

A team of University of Illinois researchers has discovered the existence of hot atomic hydrogen (H) atoms in an upper layer of Earth's atmosphere known as the thermosphere. This finding, which the authors report in Nature Communications, significantly changes current understanding of the H distribution and its interaction with other atmospheric constituents.

Because H atoms are very light, they can easily overcome a planet's gravitational force and permanently escape into interplanetary space. The ongoing...

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Transforming plant cells from generalists to specialists

Proteins team up to trigger stem cell differentiation in plant roots

As a growing plant extends its roots into the soil, the new cells that form at their tips assume different roles, from transporting water and nutrients to...

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Virtual Reality in Medicine: New Opportunities for Diagnostics and Surgical Planning

Before an operation, surgeons have to obtain the most precise image possible of the anatomical structures of the part of the body undergoing surgery. University of Basel researchers have now developed a technology that uses computed tomography data to generate a three-dimensional image in real time for use in a virtual environment.

The planning of a surgical procedure is an essential part of successful treatment. To determine how best to carry out procedures and where to make an incision,...

07.12.2016 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Porous crystalline materials: TU Graz researcher shows method for controlled growth

Microporous crystals (MOFs) have a great potential as functional materials of the future. Paolo Falcaro of TU Graz et al demonstrate in Nature Materials how the growth of MOFs can be precisely controlled on a large scale.

Porous crystals called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consist of metallic intersections with organic molecules as connecting elements. Thanks to their high...

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Simple processing technique could cut cost of organic PV and wearable electronics

A simple solution-based electrical doping technique could help reduce the cost of polymer solar cells and organic electronic devices, potentially expanding the applications for these technologies. By enabling production of efficient single-layer solar cells, the new process could help move organic photovoltaics into a new generation of wearable devices and enable small-scale distributed power generation.

Developed by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and colleagues from three other institutions, the technique provides a new way of inducing...

06.12.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

3-D printed kidney phantoms aid nuclear medicine dosing calibration

In nuclear medicine, the goal is to keep radiation exposure at a minimum, while obtaining quality images. Optimal dosing for individual patients can be difficult to determine. That's where 3D-printed organ models of varying size and shape could be of great use.

In a study reported in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers at the University of Würzburg in Würzburg, Germany, demonstrated that...

06.12.2016 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Robot on demand: Mobile machining of aircraft components with high precision

Within the framework of Industrie 4.0 the aircraft manufacturing industry has embarked on an automation offensive. This involves moving away from customized machinery for special processes towards universal mobile robots. The ProsihP II project "Efficient, highly productive, precision machining of large CFRP structures", which was funded by the State of Lower Saxony, involved experts from a wide range of disciplines who set out to develop technology for the mobile, high-precision machining of large CFRP components using robots working in parallel.Spurred on by their own innovation, the project team has now achieved the ambitious objective of the project.

Last week Fraunhofer IFAM scientists and their project partners presented the intelligent milling system at Research Center CFK NORD in Stade.

06.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Closing the carbon loop

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

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