Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 227,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 227,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: Sculpting solar systems: Magnetic fields seen for first time

Astronomers have caught their first glimpse of the invisible magnetic fields that sculpt solar systems.

Looking at a bright, nearby baby star and the dust swirling in its cradle, astronomers from the University of Illinois and six collaborating institutions were...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Here's Looking At You: Spooky Shadow Play Gives Jupiter a Giant Eye

Hubble treats astronomers to gorgeous close-up views of the eerie outer planets. But it's a bit of a trick when it seems like the planet's looking back at you!

This happened on April 21, 2014, when Hubble was being used to monitor changes in Jupiter's immense Great Red Spot (GRS) storm. During the exposures, the...

31.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

A new study from researchers at the University of Bath and Queen Mary University of London has reported the first evidence that fish are able to process multiple objects simultaneously.

The discovery is proof not just that fish are more intelligent than their reputation for a ‘three-second memory’ suggests, but importantly paves the way for...

31.10.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Tracking Heat-Driven Decay in Leading Electric Vehicle Batteries

Rechargeable electric vehicles are one of the greatest tools against rising pollution and carbon emissions, and their widespread adoption hinges on battery performance.

Scientists specializing in nanotechnology continue to hunt for the perfect molecular recipe for a battery that drives down price, increases durability, and...

31.10.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Low Carb, High Fat Diets May Reduce Seizures in Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Epilepsy is a nervous system disorder in which the nerve cells in the brain work abnormally, causing seizures. About 50 million people have epilepsy worldwide,...

31.10.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Blocking a Fork in the Road to DNA Replication

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It’s a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.

In a developing organism, few cellular processes are as critical as accurate DNA replication. When successful, replication transmits genetic material from...

31.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Unlocking the secrets of pulmonary hypertension

UAlberta research team discovers a link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important...

31.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

2014 Antarctic Ozone Hole Holds Steady

The Antarctic ozone hole reached its annual peak size on Sept. 11, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The size of this year’s hole was 24.1 million square kilometers (9.3 million square miles) — an area roughly the size of North America.

The single-day maximum area was similar to that in 2013, which reached 24.0 million square kilometers (9.3 million square miles). The largest single-day ozone...

31.10.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Hubble Sees 'Ghost Light' From Dead Galaxies

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has picked up the faint, ghostly glow of stars ejected from ancient galaxies that were gravitationally ripped apart several billion years ago. The mayhem happened 4 billion light-years away, inside an immense collection of nearly 500 galaxies nicknamed “Pandora’s Cluster,” also known as Abell 2744.

The scattered stars are no longer bound to any one galaxy, and drift freely between galaxies in the cluster. By observing the light from the orphaned stars,...

31.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Synthetic Lethality Offers a New Approach to Kill Tumor Cells, Explains Moffitt Cancer Center Researcher

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins.

A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain...

31.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

European salamanders and newts vulnerable to fungal disease from Asia

A skin-eating fungal disease brought to Europe by humans now poses a major threat to native salamanders and newts, scientists of the Universities of Zurich and Ghent University have warned. They say nations need to urgently consider appropriate biosecurity measures to stop the further spread of this pathogen.

The previously unknown fungus Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans was discovered last year by researchers investigating a huge crash in the population of fire...

31.10.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

NIST 'combs' the atmosphere to measure greenhouse gases

By remotely "combing" the atmosphere with a custom laser-based instrument, researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), have developed a new technique that can accurately measure—over a sizeable distance—amounts of several of the major "greenhouse" gases implicated in climate change.

The technique potentially could be used in several ways to support research on atmospheric greenhouse gases. It can provide accurate data to support ongoing...

30.10.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer.

Enzymes like PRC1 turn on or turn off the activity of genes in a cell by manipulating individual chromosome units called nucleosomes. "The nucleosome is a key...

30.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

High-intensity sound waves may aid regenerative medicine

By liquefying cells with ultrasound, researchers lay bare cellular scaffolding that could serve as a template on which to grow new tissue

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a way to use sound to create cellular scaffolding for tissue engineering, a unique approach that...

30.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New study finds oceans arrived early to Earth

Earth is known as the Blue Planet because of its oceans, which cover more than 70 percent of the planet's surface and are home to the world's greatest diversity of life. While water is essential for life on the planet, the answers to two key questions have eluded us: where did Earth's water come from and when?

While some hypothesize that water came late to Earth, well after the planet had formed, findings from a new study led by scientists at the Woods Hole...

30.10.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals

Bigger is better, if you're a leatherback sea turtle.

For the first time, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

30.10.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Mainz University Medical Center opens the first Atrial Fibrillation Unit in Germany

Diagnostic and therapy unit for the care of patients with atrial fibrillation

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder....

30.10.2014 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing

What does it take to fabricate electronic and medical devices tinier than a fraction of a human hair?

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego recently invented a new method of lithography in which nanoscale robots swim over the surface of...

30.10.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Griffith scientists propose existence and interaction of parallel worlds

Griffith University academics are challenging the foundations of quantum science with a radical new theory based on the existence of, and interactions between, parallel universes.

In a paper published in the prestigious journal Physical Review X, Professor Howard Wiseman and Dr Michael Hall from Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics,...

30.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Smithsonian scientist discovers populations of rare songbird in surprising new habitat

America's pine plantations provide hope for the future of the Swainson's warbler

The Swainson's warbler (Limnothlypis swainsonii) is one of the rarest and most secretive songbirds in North America, prized by birdwatchers in the southeastern...

30.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Lou Gehrig's disease study: Renewing brain's aging support cells may help neurons survive

Cedars-Sinai ALS research shows that aging astrocytes lose the ability to protect motor neurons, which control movement, but replacing old cells with younger ones engineered to restore an important protein may improve neuron survival

Lou Gehrig's disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and...

30.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

The geometry of RNA

A new method simplifies the analysis of RNA structure

Messenger, transfer, ribosomal... there's more than one type of RNA. The difference lies not only in the sequence of the nucleotides, the "beads" that form the...

30.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Seeing dinosaur feathers in a new light

University of Bonn researchers postulate: Dinosaurs' color vision sheds light on the origin of feathers

Why were dinosaurs covered in a cloak of feathers long before the early bird species Archaeopteryx first attempted flight? Researchers from the University of...

30.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Research group leader Samuel Sánchez is one of Spain’s top ten innovators

Tiny little self-propelled motors that speed through the water and clean up pollutions along the way or small robots that can swim effortlessly through blood to one day transport medication to a certain part of the body – what sounds like taken from a science fiction movie script.

Samuel Sánchez however is already hard at work in his lab at the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart to make these visions come true. For his innovative...

30.10.2014 | Science Education | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Registration Open Now: 18th International ESAFORM Conference on Material Forming

28.10.2014 | Event News

Comparing Apples and Oranges? A Colloquium on International Comparative Urban Research

22.10.2014 | Event News

Battery Conference April 2015 in Aachen

16.10.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

Sculpting solar systems: Magnetic fields seen for first time

31.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

Here's Looking At You: Spooky Shadow Play Gives Jupiter a Giant Eye

31.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

New research reveals fish are smarter than we thought

31.10.2014 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>