Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 246,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 246,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties.

"We created the I-Wire Heart-on-a-Chip so that we can understand why cardiac cells behave the way they do by asking the cells questions, instead of just...

23.02.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Light-driven reaction converts carbon dioxide into fuel

Illuminated rhodium nanoparticles catalyze key chemistry

Duke University researchers have developed tiny nanoparticles that help convert carbon dioxide into methane using only ultraviolet light as an energy source.

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters

Rutgers' Nicole Fahrenfeld leads research documenting impacts in stream water and sediments from a wastewater disposal facility

Wastewater from oil and gas operations -- including fracking for shale gas -- at a West Virginia site altered microbes downstream, according to a Rutgers-led...

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria – an evolutionary advantage?

Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called bacteriophage. They carry so called auxiliary metabolic genes in their genome, which are responsible for producing certain proteins that give the virus an advantage. Researchers at the University of Kaiserslautern and the Ruhr University Bochum have analysed the structure of such a protein more closely. It appears to stimulate the photosynthesis of host bacteria. The study has now been published in the prestigious journal ‘The Journal of Biological Chemistry’.

Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called...

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Researchers pave the way for ionotronic nanodevices

Discovery helps develop a new kind of electrically switchable memories

Ionotronic devices rely on charge effects based on ions, instead of electrons or in addition to electrons. These devices open new opportunities for creating...

23.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

Easy way of fabricating miniature hotplates

Gas sensors used for leakage alerts and air quality monitoring are essential in our daily lives. Towards a ubiquitous society, smart gas sensors, which perform...

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

Hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide according to the World Health Organization. Inner ear sensory cells, called hair cells, are responsible for detecting sound and helping to signal it to the brain. Loud sounds and toxic drugs can lead to death of the hair cells, which do not regenerate, and is the root cause for widespread hearing loss. Until now, it was not possible to promote the generation of sufficient quantities of new hair cells.

In a new paper in Cell Reports, scientists from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Massachusetts Eye & Ear describe a...

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

New planetary formation models from Carnegie's Alan Boss indicate that there may be an undiscovered population of gas giant planets orbiting around Sun-like stars at distances similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. His work is published by The Astrophysical Journal.

The population of exoplanets discovered by ongoing planet-hunting projects continues to increase. These discoveries can improve models that predict where to...

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder

An international research team from the University Hospital of Munich (LMU), Newcastle University and the University of Liverpool has identified a gene mutation that causes a hereditary skeletal muscle disorder. The study is published in the "American Journal of Human Genetics".

The starting point for this discovery was a family in which two of six children dad been living with delayed motor development and muscle weakness since birth....

22.02.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

Rechargeable lithium batteries with cathodes comprising nickel, manganese, and cobalt, are viewed as the most potent today. But they, too, have a limited lifespan. Already in the first cycle they lose up to ten percent of their capacity. Why this happens and what can be done to alleviate the ensuing gradual loss of capacity has now been investigated in detail by a team of scientists using positrons at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

Rechargeable lithium batteries with cathodes comprising nickel, manganese, and cobalt, are viewed as the most potent today. But they, too, have a limited...

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

Scientists at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience are working to understand how neurons in the cerebellum, a region in the back of the brain that controls movement, interact with each other

In a study published in Cell Reports in February 2017, Matt Rowan, Ph.D., a Post-doctoral researcher in the lab of Dr. Jason Christie, sought to understand the...

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

Researchers of the Chemnitz University of Technology develop tough electronic for sport and medical science

Researchers of the Chemnitz University of Technology develop tough electronic for sport and medical science

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products | nachricht Read more

The Micro Nanotech area at MD&M West has been successfully established

MD&M West in Anaheim is considered to be the world's largest trade fair for design and manufacturing in medical technology. Most of the 20,000 visitors are developers and decision makers from the manufacturing industry of medical technology. The joint booth of the IVAM Microtechnology Network in hall c was again branded as “Micro Nanotech“ area and bundled the high-tech component manufacturers for the supply market.

MD&M West in Anaheim is considered to be the world's largest trade fair for design and manufacturing in medical technology. Most of the 20,000 visitors are...

22.02.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

NASA's fermi finds possible dark matter ties in andromeda galaxy

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious stuff known as dark matter. The gamma-ray signal is similar to one seen by Fermi at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy.

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has found a signal at the center of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy that could indicate the presence of the mysterious...

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Wintering ducks connect isolated wetlands by dispersing plant seeds

Plant populations in wetland areas face increasing isolation as wetlands are globally under threat from habitat loss and fragmentation. Erik Kleyheeg and Merel Soons of Utrecht University show that the daily movement behaviour of wintering mallards is highly predictable from the landscape they live in and that their daily flights contribute to maintaining the connections between wetland plant populations across increasingly fragmented landscapes. The researchers and co-authors are publishing their results today in the academic journal Journal of Ecology.

Plant populations in wetland areas face increasing isolation as wetlands are globally under threat from habitat loss and fragmentation. Erik Kleyheeg and Merel...

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

Warming seawaters, caused by climate change and extreme climatic events, threaten the stability of tropical coral reefs, with potentially devastating implications for many reef species and the human communities that reefs support.

New research by the University of Exeter shows that increased surface ocean temperatures during the strong 2016 El Niño led to a major coral die-off event in...

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

A new digital breast tomosynthesis technique has the potential to reduce the rate at which women are called back for additional examinations without sacrificing cancer detection, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

A new digital breast tomosynthesis technique has the potential to reduce the rate at which women are called back for additional examinations without...

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

The EU project “LISTEN” creates a robust, hands-free speech control interface for smart home systems. Best practice examples for the use of EML speech technology (part 2) – booth and live demos at the CCW fair in Berlin, February 21-23, 2017

The EU project “LISTEN” creates a robust, hands-free speech control interface for smart home systems. Best practice examples for the use of EML speech...

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

For decades, scientists working with genetic material have labored with a few basic rules in mind. To start, DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA), and mRNA is translated into proteins, which are essential for almost all biological functions. The central principle regarding that translation has long held that only a small number of three-letter sequences in mRNA, known as start codons, could trigger the production of proteins. But researchers might need to revisit and possibly rewrite this rule, after recent measurements from a team including scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

For decades, scientists working with genetic material have labored with a few basic rules in mind. To start, DNA is transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA), and...

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

A tiny snail may offer an alternative to opioids for pain relief. Scientists at the University of Utah have found a compound that blocks pain by targeting a pathway not associated with opioids. Research in rodents indicates that the benefits continue long after the compound have cleared the body. The findings were reported online in the February 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

A tiny snail may offer an alternative to opioids for pain relief. Scientists at the University of Utah have found a compound that blocks pain by targeting a...

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

Rising temperatures could accelerate climate change by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide stored in ponds and increasing the methane they release, new research shows.

Rising temperatures could accelerate climate change by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide stored in ponds and increasing the methane they release, new...

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tune your radio: galaxies sing while forming stars

A team of astronomers led by Fatemeh Tabatabaei from the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), including scientists from two Max Planck institutes (MPIfR, Bonn and MPIA, Heidelberg), has measured the radio emission for a large sample of galaxies with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope at different wavelengths. These galaxies were selected from the KINGFISH sample previously observed in the infrared with the Herschel satellite. This allows for the first time a comparative study of a total of 52 spiral galaxies. A reliable method could be established to determine the star formation rate exclusively from radio data without including other spectral regimes.

A team of astronomers led by Fatemeh Tabatabaei from the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), including scientists from two Max Planck institutes...

21.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Improved Speech Intelligibility and Automatic Speech-to-Text Conversion for Call Centers

At Call Center World (CCW), taking place February 21 – 23 in Berlin, Fraunhofer IDMT will be presenting state-of-the-art software solutions for improved speech intelligibility and automatic speech-to-text conversion.

At Call Center World (CCW), taking place February 21 – 23 in Berlin, Fraunhofer IDMT will be presenting state-of-the-art software solutions for improved speech...

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

23.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Light-driven reaction converts carbon dioxide into fuel

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>