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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 227,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 227,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: Once CD8 T cells take on one virus, they'll fight others too

Scientists think of CD8 T cells as long-lived cells that become tuned to fight just one pathogen, but a new study finds that once CD8 T cells fight one pathogen, they also join the body's "innate" immune system, ready to answer the calls of the cytokine signals that are set off by a wide variety of infections.

Think of CD8 T cells as soldiers who are drafted and trained for a specific mission, but who stay in service, fighting a variety of enemies throughout a long...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

NASA's HS3 Mission Continues With Flights Over Hurricane Gonzalo

Tropical Storm Gonzalo strengthened into a hurricane on Oct. 14 when it was near Puerto Rico and provided a natural laboratory for the next phase of NASA's HS3 or Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel mission.

The WB-57 aircraft flew over Hurricane Gonzalo on Oct. 15 carrying two HS3 mission instruments called HIWRAP and HIRAD in addition to a new Office of Naval...

21.10.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

UCSF researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking

MicroRNA lowers levels of protective protein in brain regions important for the development of alcohol addiction

A team of UC San Francisco researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from...

21.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Even depressed people believe that life gets better

Adults typically believe that life gets better — today is better than yesterday was and tomorrow will be even better than today. A new study shows that even depressed individuals believe in a brighter future, but this optimistic belief may not lead to better outcomes. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

The research shows that middle-aged adults who had a history of depression tended to evaluate their past and current lives in more negative terms than did...

21.10.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Alternate approach to traditional CPR saves lives

Use of ECMO during CPR improves outcomes

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)...

21.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Expert highlights research innovation and is optimistic about the future of IBS treatment

UEG Week presents new research on current therapies for irritable bowel syndrome

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may at last be able to hope for a brighter future as innovative new treatments emerge and researchers clarify the...

21.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Hubble Finds Extremely Distant Galaxy through Cosmic Magnifying Glass

Peering through a giant cosmic magnifying glass, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has spotted one of the farthest, faintest, and smallest galaxies ever seen. The diminutive object is estimated to be over 13 billion light-years away.

This new detection is considered one of the most reliable distance measurements of a galaxy that existed in the early universe, said the Hubble researchers....

20.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action

Depression deconstructed -- NIH study

A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of – and ahead of – its other antidepressant effects, in a...

20.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Over-organizing repair cells set the stage for fibrosis

The excessive activity of repair cells in the early stages of tissue recovery sets the stage for fibrosis by priming the activation of an important growth factor, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology.

Myofibroblasts are highly contractile cells that repair damaged tissues by replacing and reorganizing the extracellular matrix (ECM), the meshwork that fills...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Superconducting circuits, simplified

New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips

Computer chips with superconducting circuits — circuits with zero electrical resistance — would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today's chips, an...

20.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New SPECT System scans virtually every patient and minimizes costs

  • Smallest room size requirement in its class*
  • High throughput and exceptional detector flexibility
  • Industry-leading image resolution

Siemens Healthcare introduces the Symbia Evo Excel SPECT system at the 27th Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). The system is a...

20.10.2014 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

‘Red Effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys

Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions.

“Previous research shows that the color red in a mating context makes people more attractive, and in the fighting context makes people seem more threatening...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Later supper for blackbirds in the city. Artificial light gives birds longer to forage for food.

Artificial light increases foraging time in blackbirds. Birds in city centres are active not just considerably earlier, but also for longer than their relatives in darker parts of the city. That is the result of a study of around 200 blackbirds in Leipzig, which was carried out in the framework of the "Loss of the Night" research project.

The study showed that artificial light has a considerable influence on the activity times of blackbirds in the city and therefore on their natural cycles,...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Could reading glasses soon be a thing of the past?

Implantable eye devices that improve vision up close could soon be a viable alternative for aging eyes in the United States

A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over...

20.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Climate change alters cast of winter birds

Over the past two decades, the resident communities of birds that attend eastern North America's backyard bird feeders in winter have quietly been remade, most likely as a result of a warming climate.

Writing this week in the journal Global Change Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison wildlife biologists Benjamin Zuckerberg and Karine Princé document that...

20.10.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice

Study produces unprecedented model to study intestinal diseases

Researchers have successfully transplanted "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice –...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Head injury causes the immune system to attack the brain

Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries - stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells.

The study, published in the open access journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the...

20.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Magnetic white dwarfs appear younger than they are

Scientists from Göttingen University link magnetic fields to atmospheric convection

An international group of astronomers including a scientist from the University of Göttingen has found an explanation of the long-standing mystery of why...

20.10.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream

Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices

DNA has garnered attention for its potential as a programmable material platform that could spawn entire new and revolutionary nanodevices in computer science,...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires

The claim by UMass Amherst researchers that the microbe Geobacter produces tiny electrical wires has been mired in controversy for a decade, but a new collaborative study provides stronger evidence than ever to support their claims.

The claim by microbiologist Derek Lovley and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst that the microbe Geobacter produces tiny electrical wires,...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain and inflammation in cataract surgery patients

First-of-its-kind device may solve issue of poor patient compliance with eye drops

The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye...

20.10.2014 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants

Scientists at The University of Manchester hope a major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins. The result is a culmination of 15 years of research and has been published in Nature. It details how certain organisms manage to lower the toxicity of pollutants.

The team at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology were investigating how some natural organisms manage to lower the level of toxicity and shorten the life...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

In between red and blue light: Researchers discover new functionality of molecular light switches

Diatoms play an important role in water quality and in the global climate. They generate about one fourth of the oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere and perform around one-quarter of the global CO2 assimilation, i.e. they convert carbon dioxide into organic substances. Their light receptors are a crucial factor in this process.

Researchers at Leipzig University and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research have now discovered that blue and red light sensing photoreceptors...

20.10.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Mutations in the body's cells randomly accumulate as part of the aging process, and most are harmless. For some people, genetic changes in blood cells can...

20.10.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Once CD8 T cells take on one virus, they'll fight others too

21.10.2014 | Life Sciences

NASA's HS3 Mission Continues With Flights Over Hurricane Gonzalo

21.10.2014 | Earth Sciences

UCSF researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking

21.10.2014 | Life Sciences

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