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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 253,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 253,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.


Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

An international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles - polaritons. In the resulting polariton lattice, certain particles' energy does not depend on their speed. At the same time, the lattice's geometry, particle concentration and polarization properties can still be modified. This opens up new perspectives for study of quantum effects and the use of optical computing. Results of the study were published in Physical Review Letters.

A solid body is formed around a crystal lattice formed by atomic nuclei. Lattice geometry may influence the relation between a particle's energy and velocity....

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which is roughly 30 times more harmful to the climate than carbon dioxide (CO2). Both gases are produced in thawing permafrost as dead animal and plant remains are decomposed. However, methane is only formed if no oxygen is available.

Until now, it was assumed that larger amounts of greenhouse gases are formed when the ground was dry and well aerated - when oxygen was available. Christian...

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists invented method of catching bacteria with 'photonic hook'

An international research team discovered a new type of curved light beams, dubbed a "photonic hook". Photonic hooks are unique, as their radius of curvature is two times smaller than their wavelength. This is the smallest curvature radius of electromagnetic waves ever recorded. Photonic hook can improve the resolution of optical systems and control the movement of nanoparticles, individual cells, viruses or bacteria. Results of this research were published in Optics Letters and Scientific Reports.

For the longest time, physicists claimed that electromagnetic radiation propagates along a straight line; however, in 2007 the existence of a curved...

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Next Generation Cryptography

Experts are warning: Cryptography must become more flexible in order to be able to react quickly to technical changes. If this does not happen soon, the cyber world could experience a security meltdown. The complete report is now available online at

Whether online-banking or blockchain – most IT security mechanisms for protecting data and digital communication are based on cryptography. Quantum computers...

20.03.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Earlier flowering of modern winter wheat cultivars

Researchers from Göttingen University study effects of climate change and plant breeding

Changing crop phenology is considered an important bio-indicator of climate change. Researchers from the University of Göttingen together with colleagues from...

20.03.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Smithsonian researchers name new ocean zone: The rariphotic

New zone comprises reef fishes--including numerous new species -- That live well below shallow coral reefs

Based on the unique fish fauna observed from a manned submersible on a southern Caribbean reef system in Curaçao, Smithsonian explorers defined a new...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs

Tuberculosis, which infects roughly one quarter of the world's population and kills nearly two million people a year, is not only deadly but ancient: signs of the disease have been found in Egyptian mummies. Despite its age, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes the illness, continues to learn new tricks. It has a particular knack for evolving antibiotic resistance, leaving hundreds of thousands of people with few treatment options.

Now, research conducted by Rockefeller scientists under the direction of Seth Darst, the Jack Fishman Professor, and Elizabeth Campbell, a senior research...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

USTC reports diamond ring architecture of a protein complex

Just as diamond ring is needed in marriage, NuA4/Tip60, a complex with diamond ring architecture, is required for regulatory and repairing processes. Prof. CAI Gang and Prof. Jacques Côté's team reports the 4.7 Å structure of the yeast NuA4/TIP60 complex, which elucidates the detailed architecture and molecular interactions between NuA4 subunits. Related study is published online in Nature Communications on March 19th.

NuA4/Tip60 is a complex which catalyzes diverse substrates critical for gene regulation, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Yet its compositional...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cues

Precisely ordered biomaterials could be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering and wound-healing

Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Neutrons pave the way to accelerated production of lithium-ion cells

Developers from Bosch and scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are using neutrons to analyze the filling of lithium ion batteries for hybrid cars with electrolytes. Their experiments show that electrodes are wetted twice as fast in a vacuum as under normal pressure.

One of the most critical and time-consuming processes in battery production is the filling of lithium cells with electrolyte fluid following the placement the...

20.03.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

RWI/ISL-Container Throughput Index with minor decline on a high overall level

The Container Throughput Index of the RWI – Leibniz Institute for Economic Research and the Institute of Shipping Economics and Logistics (ISL) experienced a small decrease in February 2018 as it fell from 134,6 (revised figure of January) to 134,1. The Index remains on a high level, close to its all-time record. This development indicates a continuing strong world trade.

The index is based on data continuously collected from world container ports by ISL as part of its market monitoring. Because large parts of international...

20.03.2018 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Protein controls clumping of platelets during thrombosis and stroke

A cell protein called TRPM7 presumably plays an important dual role in clumping of platelets during blood clotting. Scientists from the Rudolf Virchow Center and the Hospital of the University of Würzburg have now been able to demonstrate this in a complex study. Their results could help to improve the treatment of thrombosis, heart attacks or strokes.

Thus, mice in which the TRPM7 fulfilled only one of its two functions developed significantly less brain damage after a stroke. The paper was released in the...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Breaking species barriers by “breeding” mice in a dish

How species differ from each other is a key question in biology. But genetic mapping between species has been challenging because hybrid crosses are typically sterile. Combining latest stem cell and genomic techniques, MPI scientists at the Friedrich Miescher Laboratory, Tübingen, Germany have pioneered in vitro recombination, a technique to circumvent breeding and directly cause gene exchanges in cells. In this way they have mapped differences between mouse species within weeks and created mouse embryos carrying hybrid mosaic genomes, without breeding any live mice.

Since the Antiquity, scientists have long wondered what lies at the root of the difference between species. Today, biologists are able to decode genomes, track...

20.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensions

Combining two ultra-thin material layers yields new possibilities for quantum electronics. A research team with members from TU Wien presents strongly tunable quantum systems.

Two novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope - these are the ingredients to create a novel kind...

19.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

In a new study, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair.

These nanowires, made of indium gallium arsenide, could be useful for a wide range of applications in a field scientists have termed optoelectronics, which...

19.03.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

TIB’s Visual Analytics Research Group to develop methods for person detection and visualisation

DFG funds new joint research project for automatic indexing in scientific video archives

This January saw the start of the project “Development of a software system for automatic scene and person indexing in scientific video archives “, which is...

19.03.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

19.03.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Development and Fast Analysis of 3D Printed HF Components

3D printing is becoming increasingly important for the development of modern high frequency systems as it opens up new design possibilities. Fraunhofer FHR is exploring these possibilities for its customers and partners: from designing new HF components to testing these components. Engineers are inspecting the quality of components manufactured using additive processes with their high frequency transmitted light imaging system SAMMI®, e.g. to verify the correct density gradients of the material. As a member of the Forschungsfabrik Mikroelektronik Deutschland, they will present this system at the Hannover Messe in hall 2, booth C22, from April 23 to 27, 2018.

Compact, affordable, and optimized for specific applications – 3D printing is extremely flexible when it comes to setting the electromagnetic properties of new...

19.03.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

In monogamous species, a compatible partner is more important than an ornamented one

The colour of bands attached to the legs of birds for individual identification does not have an effect on the birds’ behaviour, physiology, life-history or fitness. This result of a study from the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen contradicts long established text-book “knowledge” and questions whether ornaments play a major role in mate choice of monogamous species.

More than 35 years ago, a study reported that leg bands of certain colours have major effects on the attractiveness of an individual and hence on mate choice....

19.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Signaling Pathways to the Nucleus

Researchers have demonstrated how auxin, a hormone that controls many processes in plants, reaches its destination

A team of researchers from the University of Freiburg have discovered how the plant hormone auxin is transported within the cell and how this signaling pathway...

19.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Wandering greenhouse gas

Climate models need to take into account the interaction between methane, the Arctic Ocean and ice

On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. If this greenhouse gas...

16.03.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region

Our health, safety, and well-being depend on how well we know the chemicals that surround us, and the development of new laser sources will now make it possible to identify chemicals with greater sensitivity

Chemical compounds all carry distinctive absorption "fingerprints" within the mid-infrared spectral region of 2 to 12 microns. This offers an opportunity to...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'

Precise methods of DNA 'packing' may affect gene expression

Scientists discovered another key to how DNA forms loops and wraps inside the cell nucleus -- a precise method of "packing" that may affect gene expression.

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

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