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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 230,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 230,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Nanoscale Mirrored Cavities Amplify, Connect Quantum Memories

Advance could lead to quantum computing and the secure transfer of information over long-distance fiber optic networks

The idea of computing systems based on controlling atomic spins just got a boost from new research performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Invasive Species in the Great Lakes by 2063

New study shows the vulnerability of the basin to future invaders – and calls for regulations to mitigate this threat

The Great Lakes have been invaded by more non-native species than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. In spite of increasing efforts to stem the tide...

30.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Probiotic helps treat diabetes in rats, could lead to human remedy

Science may be one step closer to treating diabetes with a human probiotic pill, according to new Cornell University research.

In the study, published Jan. 27 in the journal Diabetes, the researchers engineered a strain of lactobacillus, a human probiotic common in the gut, to secrete...

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Walking on Ice Takes More Than Brains

Salk scientists discover how a "mini-brain" in the spinal cord aids in balance

Walking across an icy parking lot in winter—and remaining upright—takes intense concentration. But a new discovery suggests that much of the balancing act that...

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tracking Fish Easier, Quicker, Safer with New Injectable Device

Beeping tag gathers data to help make dams more fish-friendly

Fish no longer need to go under the knife to help researchers understand exactly how they swim through hydroelectric dams, thanks to a new injectable tracking...

30.01.2015 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Canceled flights: For monarch butterflies, loss of migration means more disease

Planting tropical milkweed, available at many garden centers, makes the problem worse

Human activities are disrupting the migration patterns of many species, including monarch butterflies. Some monarchs have stopped migrating to their...

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists investigate link between skyrocketing sea slug populations and warming seas

A bloom of vibrant pink nudibranchs along California's coast may signal a serious shift in ocean climate

The warm ocean temperatures that brought an endangered green sea turtle to San Francisco in September have triggered a population explosion of bright pink,...

30.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

CAT scan of nearby supernova remnant reveals frothy interior

Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, is one of the most well studied supernova remnants in our galaxy. But it still holds major surprises.

Harvard-Smithsonian and Dartmouth College astronomers have generated a new 3-D map of its interior using the astronomical equivalent of a CAT scan. They found...

30.01.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Structure of world's largest single cell is reflected at the molecular level

Daniel Chitwood, Ph.D., assistant member, and his research group at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center's in St. Louis, in collaboration with the laboratory of Neelima Sinha, Ph.D., at the University of California, Davis, are using the world's largest single-celled organism, an aquatic alga called Caulerpa taxifolia, to study the nature of structure and form in plants. They have recently reported the results of their work in the online journal, PLOS Genetics.

"Caulerpa is a unique organism," said Chitwood. "It's a member of the green algae, which are plants. Remarkably, it's a single cell that can grow to a length...

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Presentation of the WorldRiskIndex with a special focus on Urban Areas in New York

Urbanization: Driver of Risk - or Opportunities for Resilience?

As Governments and UN bodies prepare for the World-Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction (March 2015), for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG in summer...

30.01.2015 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

Picking up on the smell of evolution

UA researchers have discovered some of the changes that enable a species to drastically change its lifestyle.

For most of us, switching to a vegetarian diet might be a matter of a New Year's resolution and a fair amount of willpower, but for an entire species, it's a...

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Crystal light: New light-converting materials point to cheaper, more efficient solar power

University of Toronto engineers study first single crystal perovskites for new solar cell and LED applications

University of Toronto engineers study first single crystal perovskites for new applications Engineers have shone new light on an emerging family of...

30.01.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

A rare glimpse at the elusive saharan cheetah

New research into the critically endangered Saharan cheetah establishes it as one of the world's rarest large cats

Research by scientists and conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Zoological Society of London, and other groups published today in PLOS...

30.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

New molecular target identified for treating cerebral malaria

A drug already approved for treating other diseases may be useful as a treatment for cerebral malaria, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. They discovered a novel link between food intake during the early stages of infection and the outcome of the disease, identifying two molecular pathways that could serve as new targets for treatment.

"We have known for a long time that nutrition can affect the course of infectious disease, but we were surprised at how rapidly a mild reduction in food intake...

30.01.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Building trustworthy big data algorithms

New algorithm can separate unstructured text into topics with high accuracy and reproducibility

Much of our reams of data sit in large databases of unstructured text. Finding insights among emails, text documents, and websites is extremely difficult...

30.01.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

The tell-tale signs of a galactic merger

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this striking view of spiral galaxy NGC 7714. This galaxy has drifted too close to another nearby galaxy and the dramatic interaction has twisted its spiral arms out of shape, dragged streams of material out into space, and triggered bright bursts of star formation.

NGC 7714 is a spiral galaxy at 100 million light-years from Earth — a relatively close neighbour in cosmic terms.

30.01.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Iceland Rises as Its Glaciers Melt From Climate Change

The Earth’s crust under Iceland is rebounding as global warming melts the island’s great ice caps, according to a new study accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The paper is the first to show the current fast uplift of the Icelandic crust is a result of accelerated melting of the island’s glaciers and coincides with...

30.01.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Damaged DNA May Stall Patrolling Molecule to Initiate Repair

Sites where DNA is damaged may cause a molecule that slides along the DNA strand to scan for damage to slow on its patrol, delaying it long enough to recognize and initiate repair. The finding suggests that the delay itself may be the key that allows the protein molecule to find its target, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Usually, the repair protein zips along quickly, says Anjum Ansari, UIC professor of physics and co-principal investigator on the study, published this month in...

29.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Researchers Capture, Document First Northern Saw-Whet Owl in Arkansas

Work will help scientists determine where the rare birds spend winter

Wildlife biologists at the University of Arkansas have captured and documented the first northern saw-whet owl in Arkansas.

29.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

X-Ray Study Reveals Division of Labor in Cell Health Protein

Identical Substructures in 'TH Protein' Couple Two Crucial Cellular Functions

Researchers working in part at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered that a key protein for cell health, which has...

29.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Programmed Synthesis towards Multi-substituted Benzene Derivatives

Chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University and the JST-ERATO Project have developed a new method to accomplish the programmed synthesis of benzene derivatives with five or six different functional groups that enables access to novel functional organic materials that could not have been reached before.

Professor Kenichiro Itami, Junichiro Yamaguchi, Yasutomo Segawa and Shin Suzuki at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM), Nagoya University and...

29.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

MSU Sesame Test Plots Back Growing Interest

Mississippi farmers interested in growing sesame have to rely mainly on recommendations made for Texas fields, a problem Mississippi State University researchers are working to address.

Sesame produces small, edible seeds valued for consumption and oil production. Consumers recognize it most frequently as the tasty seeds on hamburger buns, but...

29.01.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Smoother sailing through sharing

Mathematical analysis reveals how to maximize access to mobile networks by seamlessly ‘offloading’ traffic to smaller Wi-Fi and cellular systems

Data-intense multimedia applications are stretching cellular network capacities to their limits, but A*STAR researchers have developed a strategy to ease this...

29.01.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

ORNL Researchers Tune Friction in Ionic Solids at the Nanoscale

Friction impacts motion, hence the need to control friction forces. Currently, this is accomplished by mechanistic means or lubrication, but experiments conducted by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered a way of controlling friction on ionic surfaces at the nanoscale using electrical stimulation and ambient water vapor.

The research, which demonstrates a new physical effect, was undertaken at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, a DOE Office of Science User Facility at...

29.01.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Invasive Species in the Great Lakes by 2063

30.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Probiotic helps treat diabetes in rats, could lead to human remedy

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences

Walking on Ice Takes More Than Brains

30.01.2015 | Life Sciences

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