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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 232,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 232,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Black Phosphorus Is New ‘Wonder Material’ for Improving Optical Communication

Phosphorus, a highly reactive element commonly found in match heads, tracer bullets, and fertilizers, can be turned into a stable crystalline form known as black phosphorus. In a new study, researchers from the University of Minnesota used an ultrathin black phosphorus film—only 20 layers of atoms—to demonstrate high-speed data communication on nanoscale optical circuits.

The devices showed vast improvement in efficiency over comparable devices using the earlier “wonder material” graphene.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

“Planck” Puts Einstein to the Test

Data analysis of satellite mission on dark energy and theory of gravitation

Researchers, including physicists from Heidelberg University, have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analysing data from...

05.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Cebit 2015: DIY Printing Custom Touch-Sensitive Displays

Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a technique that could enable virtually anyone to print out customized displays of their own in future – in all shapes and sizes and onto various materials. A regular home printer could be used to print wafer-thin displays onto paper, so these printed displays might present custom-designed icons or even respond to touch. The researchers are presenting their award-winning approach at the computer trade show Cebit in Hanover from March 16th to March 20th (Hall 9, Booth 13).

The postcard shows a vintage automobile. With the push of a button, the rear axis and the steering wheel rod of the vehicle light up in the same colour. This...

05.03.2015 | CeBIT 2015 | nachricht Read more

Permafrost's turn of the microbes

Study reveals clues to how drowsy microbes in Arctic tundra change to methane-makers as permafrost thaws

As the Arctic warms, tons of carbon locked away in Arctic tundra will be transformed into the powerful greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane, but...

05.03.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Activating genes on demand

New mechanism for engineering traits governed by multiple genes paves the way for various advances in genomics and regenerative medicine

When it comes to gene expression - the process by which our DNA provides the recipe used to direct the synthesis of proteins and other molecules that we need...

05.03.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New protein booster may lead to better DNA vaccines and gene therapy

Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive and easier to store than traditional vaccines.

Their approach, based on research results published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, improves upon an existing...

05.03.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Big box stores could ditch the grid, use natural gas fuel cells instead

Study finds potential for reduced carbon emissions and lower power costs

Large facilities like big box stores or hospitals could keep the lights on by using a fuel cell that runs off the natural gas that already flows in pipelines...

05.03.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Protecting crops from radiation-contaminated soil

Almost four years after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, farmland remains contaminated with higher-than-natural levels of radiocesium in some regions of Japan, with cesium-134 and cesium-137 being the most troublesome because of the slow rate at which they decay.

In a study published in Scientific Reports, a group at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan led by Ryoung Shin has identified a chemical...

05.03.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

3-D imaging reveals hidden forces behind clogs, jams, avalanches, earthquakes

Pick up a handful of sand, and it flows through your fingers like a liquid. But when you walk on the beach, the sand supports your weight like a solid. What happens to the forces between the jumbled sand grains when you step on them to keep you from sinking?

An international team of researchers collaborating at Duke University have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or...

05.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Northeastern researchers make breakthrough discovery in cancer treatment

Michail Sitkovsky, an immunophysiology expert at Northeastern, and his research colleagues have found that supplemental oxygenation could shrink tumors and improve cancer immunotherapy

Michail Sitkovsky, an immunophysiology expert at Northeastern University, and his research colleagues have made a breakthrough discovery in cancer treatment....

05.03.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Full-annual-cycle models track migratory bird populations throughout the year

Ignoring the wintering ranges of migratory birds when studying their populations is like doing a puzzle with half of the pieces missing. In a new Review published this week in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, Jeffrey Hostetler and his colleagues show how statistical analysis can fill in those missing pieces.

Many birds spend only a few months of the year in their breeding range before leaving to spend the winter in another region or even on another continent, and...

05.03.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Oxygen arrived at the bottom of the Central Baltic Sea

Two and a half months after oxygen rich North Sea water entered the Baltic Sea, IOW scientists measure its effect in the Gotland Basin.

The Eastern Gotland Basin in the centre of the Baltic Sea is the largest and second deepest of the Baltic Sea basins. Here, the water masses and any marine...

05.03.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flexible and Functional – Prefabricated Façade Elements Simplify Building Renovation

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE have developed façade elements where the building’s heating, ventilation and sanitation systems are integrated into the thermal insulation panels of the building envelope.

The multi-functional insulation boards and window elements can be implemented in new buildings as well as buildings undergoing renovation. The type of...

04.03.2015 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

Emissions under control: comprehensive exhaust air analysis during laser processing of plastics

In order to provide optimal protection for machine operators and the environment, it is utterly necessary to know exactly which emissions are being released during laser processing of plastics. Scientists at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and at the Kunststoff Zentrum SKZ in Würzburg have compiled a comprehensive analysis of the main emissions released during laser processing of plastics. This information is now available in the form of emission data sheets.

What is the influence of the laser output or process speed on the hazardous materials released? How are the materials, process conditions and emissions related?

04.03.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Graphene, the wonder material, goes textile

Surface coating sets new standards for personal protective equipment (PPE)

What does a graphite or lead pencil have to do with a spectacular discovery in the world of materials research? Graphene is a single layer of carbon just one...

04.03.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flower-like Magnetic Nanoparticles Target Difficult Tumors

Dartmouth College researchers aim to treat deep-seated tumors, such as those found in pancreatic cancer, by using a flower-shaped magnetic nanoparticle capable of reaching deeper within the human body than currently available methods

Thanks to the work of an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Dartmouth Center of Nanotechnology Excellence, funded by the National Institutes of...

04.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Iowa State Engineers Developing Pavement Technologies to Clear Snow and Ice From Runways

Alireza Sassani turned a switch and sent 60 volts of electricity into a small block of concrete. A few minutes later the Iowa State University doctoral student took some measurements and found the block’s surface temperature had risen from 64 degrees Fahrenheit to 189 degrees.

Next, Therin Young stepped up to the demonstration table and carefully squeezed drops of green-colored water on top of another set of small concrete blocks....

04.03.2015 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

Researchers Find 3-D Printed Parts Provide Low-Cost, Custom Alternatives for Lab Equipment

The 3-D printing scene, a growing favorite of do-it-yourselfers, has spread to the study of plasma physics. With a series of experiments, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found that 3-D printers can be an important tool in laboratory environments.

"The printer is now a crucial piece of our laboratory and used regularly," said Andrew Zwicker, the head of Science Education at PPPL and lead author of a...

04.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Float Like a Mosquito, Sting Like a…Mosquito

Researchers evaluate mosquitoes' ability to float on water in order to potentially design aquatic robots

Small semi-aqueous arthropods, such as mosquitoes and water striders, are free to go about their waterborne business thanks to their unique leg-based...

04.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

A+++ to G: Introduction of Energy Efficiency Label for Heating Systems and Thermal Storage Devices

Fraunhofer ISE Supports Companies with the Introduction of the EU Energy Label

As of September 26, 2015, heating systems will have to bear an European Union energy label. The label, which already applies to refrigerators and washing...

04.03.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

New Technique Improves Forecasts for Canada’s Prized Salmon Fishery

Method based on field data performs better than traditional management forecast tools

A powerful method for analyzing and predicting nature’s dynamic and interconnected systems is now providing new forecasting and management tools for Canada’s...

04.03.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Conservation Organizations Need to Keep Up with Nature

Nature is on the move. As the impacts of climate change reveal themselves, species and ecosystems are moving in response. This poses a fundamental challenge to conservation organizations—how do you conserve something that won't stay still?

A new paper authored by a University of Tennessee, Knoxville, professor suggests that in order to cope, conservation organizations need to adapt like the...

04.03.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Results Challenge Conventional Wisdom About Where the Brain Begins Processing Visual Information

Neuroscientists generally think of the front end of the human visual system as a simple light detection system: The patterns produced when light falls on the retina are relayed to the visual cortex at the rear of the brain, where all of the “magic” happens that transforms these patterns into the three-dimensional world view that we perceive with our mind’s eye.

Now, however, a brain imaging study – published online by the journal Nature Neuroscience on Mar. 2 – challenges this basic assumption. Using high-resolution...

04.03.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Study Shows the Factors Influencing Which Conservation News Get Shared or Liked in Twitter and Facebook

Public awareness is often a crucial first step towards policy change and resolution of conservation issues because societal values determine whether initiatives gain support. There is evidence that public engagement positively influences civic participation. Therefore, conservation science needs to engage the general public to ensure successful conservation interventions.

News coverage of conservation issues is an important pathway to transfer information to large audiences because it can translate academic research and policy...

04.03.2015 | Communications Media | nachricht Read more

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Event News

70 Nobel laureates and 672 young scientists expected at Lindau

04.03.2015 | Event News

Registration open: 11th X-ray Forum for Customers of GE’s Digital Radiography and Industrial CT Inspection Technologies

04.03.2015 | Event News

ΣYSTEMS INTEGRATION in Finland focusses on high-tech printing

04.03.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Planck” Puts Einstein to the Test

05.03.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

Cebit 2015: DIY Printing Custom Touch-Sensitive Displays

05.03.2015 | CeBIT 2015

Permafrost's turn of the microbes

05.03.2015 | Earth Sciences

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