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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 250,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 250,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Heating quantum matter: A novel view on topology

Physicists demonstrate how heating up a quantum system can be used as a universal probe for exotic states of matter

In physical sciences, certain quantities appear as integer multiples of fundamental and indivisible elements. This quantization of physical quantities, which...

22.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices.

The epidermal biofuel cells are a major breakthrough in the field, which has been struggling with making the devices that are stretchable enough and powerful...

22.08.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

New technique to treating mitral valve diseases: First patient data

Heart valve diseases in advanced age are frequent and require customised therapeutic options. A new development in this field has been used for the first time worldwide at Inselspital, Bern University Hospital. Its Department of Cardiology has now evaluated the first international patient data.

More and more people are fulfilling the wish for an active lifestyle into old age. But the societal trend is proceeding to the detriment of the heart, because...

22.08.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Hidden river once flowed beneath Antarctic ice

Rice University study: Flowing water influenced retreat of ancient Antarctic ice sheet

Antarctic researchers from Rice University have discovered one of nature's supreme ironies: On Earth's driest, coldest continent, where surface water rarely...

22.08.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Once invincible superbug squashed by 'superteam' of antibiotics

UB researchers use antibiotics combination to kill the first strain of highly resistant E. coli in the United States

The golden age of antibiotics may be drawing to a close.

22.08.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Nagoya physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

Nagoya University-led team of physicists use a synchrotron radiation X-ray source to probe a so-called 'structure-less' transition and develop a new understanding of molecular conductors

We normally associate conduction of electricity with metals. However, some of the high measured conductivities are found in certain organic molecular crystals....

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

New research reveals the mechanisms behind the effects of chronic stress and tiny inflammations in the brain on fatal gut failure.

Hokkaido University researchers revealed that fatal gut failure in a multiple sclerosis (MS) mouse model, EAE, under chronic stress is caused by a newly...

21.08.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Scientists from the MSU studied new liquid-crystalline photochrom

Members of the Faculties of Chemistry and Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering at the Lomonosov Moscow State University in collaboration with foreign partners have synthesized and studied new liquid-crystal photochromic polymers.

Members of the Faculties of Chemistry and Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering at the Lomonosov Moscow State University in collaboration with foreign...

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new indicator for marine ecosystem changes: the diatom/dinoflagellate index

Marine biologist from Warnemünde presents indicator for the state of foodwebs in the Baltic Sea on the basis of long-term data series on the composition of spring blooms

The European Union declared it their target to re-establish a „good ecological status“ in European seas by 2020. Quite a challenging task! But what actually is...

21.08.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

New bioimaging technique is fast and economical

New method quickly, economically, and accurately tracks multiple in vivo interactions

A new approach to optical imaging makes it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue --...

21.08.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Silk could improve sensitivity, flexibility of wearable body sensors

From smart socks to workout clothes that measure exertion, wearable body sensors are becoming the latest "must-have" technology. Now scientists report they are on the cusp of using silk, one of the world's most coveted fabrics, to develop a more sensitive and flexible generation of these multi-purpose devices that monitor a slew of body functions in real time.

The researchers are presenting their work today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest...

21.08.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

On the way to developing a new active ingredient against chronic infections

Chronic lung infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa require complex and, in most cases, long-term treatment with antibiotics—new medication is badly needed. Scientists at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) are now improving an anti-infective active ingredient with a new mode of action.

The starting point is a substance that can block the pathogenicity of the bacterium and weaken its protective biofilm. The Helmholtz Validation Fund, the DZIF...

21.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Smart Computers

Artificial neural networks decode brain activity during performed and imagined movements

Filtering information for search engines, acting as an opponent during a board game or recognizing images: Artificial intelligence has far outpaced human...

21.08.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

Researchers from the University of Freiburg are mapping the distribution of all proteins in mitochondria for the first time

Mitochondria are the cell's power stations; they transform the energy stored in nutrients so that cells can use it. If this function is disturbed, many...

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

When Israeli scientist Daniel Shechtman first saw a quasicrystal through his microscope in 1982, he reportedly thought to himself, "Eyn chaya kazo" -- Hebrew for, "There can be no such creature."

But there is, and the quasicrystal has become a subject of much research in the 35 years since Shechtman's Nobel Prize-winning discovery. What makes...

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

An international research team has developed inks made of graphene-like materials for inkjet printing. New black phosphorous inks are compatible with conventional inkjet printing techniques for optoelectronics and photonics.

Since the discovery of the Nobel Prize winning material graphene, many new nanomaterials promise to deliver exciting new photonic and optoelectronic...

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprises

Microbes dominate the planet, especially the ocean, and help support the entire marine food web. In a recent report published in Nature Microbiology, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UHM) oceanography professor Ed DeLong and his team report the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in the evolution of ocean microbe genomes.

As a group, marine microbes are extremely diverse and versatile with respect to their metabolic capabilities. All of this variability is encoded in their...

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Astrophysicists explain the mysterious behavior of cosmic rays

Scientists developed a model which explains the nature of high-energy cosmic rays in our Galaxy

A team of scientists from Russia and China has developed a model which explains the nature of high-energy cosmic rays (CRs) in our Galaxy. These CRs have...

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning device

In what could be a small step for science potentially leading to a breakthrough, an engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has taken steps toward using nanocrystal networks for artificial intelligence applications.

Elijah Thimsen, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and his collaborators have...

18.08.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptoms

Findings offer new hope for early detection and disease monitoring

Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer's disease affects the retina -- the back of the eye -- similarly to the way it affects the...

18.08.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Organ Crosstalk: Fatty Liver Can Cause Damage to Other Organs

The consensus among scientists until now has been that overweight people have an increased risk for diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure and heart attack. However, studies show that not only the extent, but above all the location and function of adipose tissue play a decisive role in the development of the disease. Several years ago, scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) in Tübingen discovered that a fatty liver can cause damage to other organs. Now, in two just-published studies they demonstrate the effects of fatty liver disease on the function of the hormone-producing islet cells in the pancreas and on renal function.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming more and more common. Approximately every third adult in the industrialized countries has a morbidly fatty liver....

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors

Researchers discover that fluorescence in ligand-protected gold nanoclusters is an intrinsic property of the gold particles themselves

With their remarkable electrical and optical properties, along with biocompatibility, photostability and chemical stability, gold nanoclusters are gaining a...

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

Flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet is likely to speed up in the future, despite a recent slowdown, because its outlet glaciers slide over wet sediment, not hard rock, new research based on seismic surveys has confirmed. This sediment will become weaker and more slippery as global temperatures rise and meltwater supply becomes more variable.

The findings challenge the view that the recent slowdowns in ice flow would continue in the long term.

The research, published in Science Advances, was led...

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

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16.08.2017 | Event News

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04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

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Latest News

Heating quantum matter: A novel view on topology

22.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

22.08.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New technique to treating mitral valve diseases: First patient data

22.08.2017 | Medical Engineering

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