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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 237,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 237,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Hubble survey unlocks clues to star birth in neighboring galaxy

In a survey of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope images of 2,753 young, blue star clusters in the neighboring Andromeda galaxy (M31), astronomers have found that M31 and our own galaxy have a similar percentage of newborn stars based on mass.

By nailing down what percentage of stars have a particular mass within a cluster, or the Initial Mass Function (IMF), scientists can better interpret the light...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Ion implanted, co-annealed, screen-printed 21% efficient n-PERT solar cells with a bifaciality >97%

The Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH) and the Institute for Electronic Materials and Devices (MBE) of the Leibniz University Hannover have successfully completed the joint-development project “CHIP” on industrial ion implanted n-type PERT (Passivated Emitter and Rear, rear Totally doped) solar cells. In CHIP, the driving mechanisms for the annealing of implant damage have been investigated scientifically with special attention on non-amorphizing boron and amorphizing BFx implants.

The Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH) and the Institute for Electronic Materials and Devices (MBE) of the Leibniz University Hannover have...

04.09.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Casting of SiSiC: new perspectives for chemical and plant engineering

Innovative casting technology for the manufacturing of silicon-infiltrated silicion carbide (SiSiC) opens new perspectives for chemical and plant engineering:

Despite its outstanding chemical, thermal and tribological properties, the high costs of production currently prevent the use of silicon-infiltrated SiSiC in...

04.09.2015 | Machine Engineering | nachricht Read more

Extremely thin ceramic components made possible by extrusion

The Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS developed a novel concept to produce thin-walled, one-sidedly closed tubes and similar geometries made of ceramics by highly productive extrusion. Thus, among others, the mass production of batteries becomes possible.

Extrusion is one of the most common shaping processes in technical ceramics. Preferably, it is used for the cost-effective production of axisymmetric...

04.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

California rising

Spatially corrected sea-level records for the Pacific coast indicate that uplift rates are overestimated

For millions of years, the Pacific and North American plates have been sliding past -- and crashing into -- one another. This ongoing conflict creates uplift,...

04.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Long-sought chiral anomaly detected in crystalline material

A study by Princeton researchers presents evidence for a long-sought phenomenon -- first theorized in the 1960s and predicted to be found in crystals in 1983 -- called the "chiral anomaly" in a metallic compound of sodium and bismuth. The additional finding of an increase in conductivity in the material may suggest ways to improve electrical conductance and minimize energy consumption in future electronic devices.

"Our research fulfills a famous prediction in physics for which confirmation seemed unattainable," said N. Phuan Ong, Princeton's Eugene Higgins Professor of...

04.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Family tree for orchids explains their astonishing variability

Orchids, a fantastically complicated and diverse group of flowering plants, have long blended the exotic with the beautiful. Most species live on trees, often in remote, tropical mountains. Their flowers can be strange -- one even flowers underground, and many species deceive their pollinators into thinking they are good to eat.

Some are florist's staples, like phalaenopsis, the hot-pink and white flower that is easy to grow and easier to sell. Beyond the "job" of looking beautiful,...

04.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gone with the wind: A new project focusses on atmospheric input of phosphorus into the Baltic Sea

In August, the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW) received the funding approval from the German Federal Environmental Agency (UBA) referring to a two-year pilot study on the atmospheric input of phosphorus in the Southern Baltic Sea. The project started with the beginning of September.

Over-fertilization and its consequences still are the major environmental issues of the Baltic Sea. To reduce the discharge of nutrients, therefore, is of...

04.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Typhoon Kilo headed west

Typhoon Kilo is the westernmost tropical cyclone of a four storms in the Pacific Ocean basin on September 4. From west to east they include Typhoon Kilo, Hurricane Ignacio, Hurricane Jimena and Tropical Storm Kevin.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Kilo and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument took an image of the storm that showed Kilo...

04.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Making nanowires from protein and DNA

The ability to custom design biological materials such as protein and DNA opens up technological possibilities that were unimaginable just a few decades ago.

For example, synthetic structures made of DNA could one day be used to deliver cancer drugs directly to tumor cells, and customized proteins could be designed...

04.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA shows upper-level westerly winds affecting Tropical Storm Fred

Upper-level westerly winds have been affecting Tropical Storm Fred in the far eastern Atlantic Ocean and continue to do so today, September 3. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed the highest thunderstorms pushed southeast of the storm's center.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathers infrared data that reveals temperatures.

04.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Penn study identifies viral product that promotes immune defense against RSV

Almost all human beings are exposed to the respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV, before their second birthdays. For most, the symptoms mimic those of the common cold: runny nose, coughing, sneezing, fever. But in some very young infants -- and some older adults -- the disease can be serious, causing respiratory problems that require hospitalization and increase the risk of developing asthma later in life.

Even in the hospital, doctors can't do much more than offer supportive care. But, with a new study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and...

04.09.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Lighter with Laser Welding

For a definitive breakthrough of lightweight materials in the automotive industry, new processes for manufacturing, testing and measuring are necessary. For this, steel-aluminum hybrid welds are of great interest, since they can be used for load-adapted, and at the same time lightweight components. Within the project LaserLeichter (Laser Lighter), the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) is currently developing a laser welding process for joining three-dimensional structures made of steel and aluminum in a hybrid design.

One of the challenges in welding steel with aluminum is to avoid hard and brittle intermetallic phases in the welding seam. These phases can occur easily,...

03.09.2015 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base

Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates

Rice University scientists have theoretically determined that the properties of atom-thick sheets of boron depend on where those atoms land.

03.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered

A group of scientists from Russia, the USA and China, led by Artyom Oganov from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), using computer generated simulation have predicted the existence of a new two-dimensional carbon material, a "patchwork" analogue of graphene called phagraphene. The results of their investigation were recently published in the journal Nano Letters.

"Unlike graphene, a hexagonal honeycomb structure with atoms of carbon at its junctions, phagraphene consists of penta-, hexa- and heptagonal carbon rings. Its...

03.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Even plants can be stressed

Environmental conditions such as drought or salinity can be detrimental to crop performance and yield. Salt is one of the major factors that negatively impact on plant growth and it is estimated that 20% of the total, and 33% of irrigated, agricultural lands are afflicted by high salt worldwide. It is therefore of great agricultural importance to find genes and mechanisms that can improve plant growth under such conditions. The team of Dr. Staffan Persson has identified a protein family that helps plants to grow on salt, and outlined a mechanism for how these proteins aid the plants to produce their biomass under salt stress conditions.

Environmental conditions such as drought, cold or salinity can be detrimental to crop performance and yield. Salt is one of the major factors that negatively...

03.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Columbia Engineering team develops targeted drug delivery to lung

New method may provide more effective treatments of many lung diseases

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have developed a new method that can target delivery of very small volumes...

03.09.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Saving coral reefs depends more on protecting fish than safeguarding locations

Reefs containing more than 600 kilograms per hectare of fish biomass should be conservation priorities

A new study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that coral reef diversity 'hotspots' in the southwestern Indian Ocean rely more on the biomass of...

03.09.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Research team from Münster develops innovative catalytic chemistry process

Inspired by the chemistry of the eye: Münster University chemists have succeeded in turning to their advantage a chemical reaction which takes place in the eye and enables us to see light and dark. It can be used to create important carbon compounds which need a lot of energy to be produced by other means.

Nature can do it, and chemists in the lab often dream of doing it: producing substances simply and ecologically – as far as possible without any undesirable...

03.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact Inverter for Uninterruptible Power Supplies

Silicon Carbide Components Enable Efficiency of 98.7 percent

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE have developed a highly compact and efficient inverter for use in uninterruptible power...

03.09.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Reward, aversion behaviors activated through same brain pathways

Findings may help explain why drugs for addiction, depression are not always effective

New research may help explain why drug treatments for addiction and depression don't work for some patients.

03.09.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Typhoon Kilo moving through northwestern Pacific Ocean

NOAA's GOES-West satellite spotted the eye in a strong Typhoon Kilo moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

At 11 a.m. EDT on September 2, Typhoon Kilo's maximum sustained winds were near 90 knots (103.6 mph/166.7 kph). It was centered near 24.3 North and 179.1 East,...

03.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA sees shapeless Tropical Depression 14E

Tropical Depression 14E can't get its act together and still appears as a shapeless, asymmetric mass of clouds and thunderstorms on infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 14E on September 2 at 0905 UTC (5:05 a.m. EDT).

03.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Only above-water microbes play a role in cave development

Only the microbes located above the water's surface contribute to the development of hydrogen-sulfide-rich caves, suggests an international team of researchers. Since 2004, researchers have been studying the Frasassi cave system, an actively developing limestone cave system located 1500 feet underground in central Italy.

Limestone caves can form when solid limestone dissolves after coming in contact with certain types of acids. The resulting void is the cave system.

03.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

Together - Work - Experience

03.09.2015 | Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ion implanted, co-annealed, screen-printed 21% efficient n-PERT solar cells with a bifaciality >97%

04.09.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Casting of SiSiC: new perspectives for chemical and plant engineering

04.09.2015 | Machine Engineering

Extremely thin ceramic components made possible by extrusion

04.09.2015 | Materials Sciences

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