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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 223,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 223,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: Mysterious molecules in space

Researchers at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics finger silicon-capped hydrocarbons as possible source of mysterious 'diffuse interstellar bands'

Over the vast, empty reaches of interstellar space, countless small molecules tumble quietly though the cold vacuum. Forged in the fusion furnaces of ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Mapping the optimal route between 2 quantum states

Experiment measures millions of quantum trajectories to predict 'most likely' route

As a quantum state collapses from a quantum superposition to a classical state or a different superposition, it will follow a path known as a quantum...

31.07.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Monoamine oxidase A: biomarker for postpartum depression

Postpartum mood swings correlated with high monoamine oxidase A binding

Many women suffer from baby blues after giving birth. Some even develop full-blown postpartum depression in the weeks that follow. Monoamine oxidase A, an...

31.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Saving Seeds the Right Way Can Save the World's Plants

Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity.

For decades, these seed collections have been guided by simple models that offer a one-size-fits-all approach for how many seeds to gather, such as...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists pinpoint bladder cancer patients who could benefit from 'tumor-softening' treatment

Scientists in Manchester have identified a protein that could help doctors decide which bladder cancer patients would benefit from a treatment that makes radiotherapy more effective, according to a study* published in the British Journal of Cancer (BJC).

The team from The University of Manchester, funded by the Medical Research Council, found that patients whose bladder tumour had high levels of a protein,...

31.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

F1000Research brings static research figures to life

Dynamically generated images let referees and readers assess paper results 'on-the-fly'

F1000Research today published new research from Bjorn Brembs, professor of neurogenetics at the Institute of Zoology, Universitaet Regensburg, in Germany, with...

31.07.2014 | Science Education | nachricht Read more

Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV

Soon, protection from HIV infection could be as simple as inserting a medicated, disappearing fabric minutes before having sex.

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method...

31.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Conservation scientists asking wrong questions on climate change impacts on wildlife

Wildlife Conservation Society, University of Queensland, and others urge more focus on more imminent threats

Scientists studying the potential effects of climate change on the world's animal and plant species are focusing on the wrong factors, according to a new paper...

31.07.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

NASA Sees Zombie Tropical Depression Genevieve Reborn

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm that the remnant low pressure area of former Tropical Storm Genevieve has become a Zombie storm, and has been reborn as a tropical depression on July 30.

Tropical Storm Genevieve weakened to a tropical depression on Sunday, July 27 and the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the system as it...

31.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Antarctic ice sheet is result of CO2 decrease, not continental breakup

Climate modelers from the University of New Hampshire have shown that the most likely explanation for the initiation of Antarctic glaciation during a major climate shift 34 million years ago was decreased carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.

The finding counters a 40-year-old theory suggesting massive rearrangements of Earth's continents caused global cooling and the abrupt formation of the...

31.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Marine pest provides advances in maritime anti-fouling and biomedicine

A team of biologists, led by Clemson University associate professor Andrew S. Mount, performed cutting-edge research on a marine pest that will pave the way for novel anti-fouling paint for ships and boats and also improve bio-adhesives for medical and industrial applications.

The team’s findings, published in Nature Communications, examined the last larval stage of barnacles that attaches to a wide variety of surfaces using highly...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Watching Schrödinger's cat die (or come to life)

Steering quantum evolution & using probes to conduct continuous error correction in quantum computers

One of the famous examples of the weirdness of quantum mechanics is the paradox of Schrödinger's cat.

31.07.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

NASA Catches Two Tropical Troublemakers in Northwestern Pacific: Halong and 96W

There are two tropical low pressure areas in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean today and they're close enough to each other to be captured in one image generated from data gathered by NASA's Aqua satellite.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over both Tropical Storm Halong and developing System 96W early on July 30 and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument...

31.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

U-M researchers find protein that fuels repair of treatment-resistant cancer cells

Imagine you're fighting for your life but no matter how hard you hit, your opponent won't go down.

The same can be said of highly treatment-resistant cancers, such as head and neck cancer, where during radiation and chemotherapy some cancer cells repair...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Research proves there is power in numbers to reduce electricity bills

Consumers can save money on their electricity bills and negotiate better deals by joining forces

Consumers can save money on their electricity bills and negotiate better deals by joining forces with similar groups of customers to switch energy suppliers...

31.07.2014 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Biologists describe mechanism promoting multiple DNA mutations

Research could lead to development of new cancer therapies

DNA mutations—long known to fuel cancer as well as evolutionary changes in a living organism—had been thought to be rare events that occur randomly throughout...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Resistance to key malaria drug spreading at alarming rate in Southeast Asia

Longer treatment courses with combination therapies prove effective in areas with drug resistance

WHAT:

31.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Fear of Losing Money, Not Spending Habits, Affects Investor Risk Tolerance, MU Study Finds

As the U.S. economy slowly recovers, many investors remain wary about investing in the stock market. Investors’ “risk tolerance,” or their willingness to take risks, is an important factor for investors deciding whether, and how much, to invest in the stock market.

Now, Michael Guillemette, an assistant professor of personal financial planning in the University of Missouri College of Human Environmental Sciences, along...

31.07.2014 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Engineering a protein to prevent brain damage from toxic agents

NYU researchers advance the stability of a protein that neutralizes toxins in common pesticides and chemical weapons

Research at New York University is paving the way for a breakthrough that may prevent brain damage in civilians and military troops exposed to poisonous...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Listening for Love: A role for echolocation in mate choice?

In a novel integrative study led by Dr. Sébastien Puechmaille, University of Greifswald, Germany, Prof. Emma Teeling, University College Dublin, Ireland and PD Dr. Björn Siemers, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany to be published in PLOS ONE, the researchers tested the role of echolocation in mate choice.

They showed for the first time that bats are indeed ‘listening’ for a good mate rather than ‘looking for one’. Combining ecology, genetics and behavioural...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Boat noise impacts development and survival of sea hares

While previous studies have shown that marine noise can affect animal movement and communication, with unknown ecological consequences, scientists from the Universities of Bristol and Exeter and the École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE) CRIOBE in France have demonstrated that boat noise stops embryonic development and increases larval mortality in sea hares.

Sea hares, (specifically the sea slug Stylocheilus striatus used in this study) usually hatch from their eggs to swim away and later feed on toxic alga but...

31.07.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Deep-sea octopus broods eggs for over four years—longer than any known animal

Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have observed a deep-sea octopus brooding its eggs for four and one half years—longer than any other known animal.

Throughout this time, the female kept the eggs clean and guarded them from predators. This amazing feat represents an evolutionary balancing act between the...

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New method provides researchers with efficient tool for tagging proteins

Aarhus University researchers have developed an easier method to create DNA–protein conjugates. The method can potentially strengthen the work involved in diagnosing diseases.

DNA linked to proteins – including antibodies – provides a strong partnership that can be used in diagnostic techniques, nanotechnology and other disciplines....

30.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The quantum Cheshire cat

Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? A quantum experiment, carried out by a team of researchers from the Vienna University of Technology, demonstrates a new kind of quantum paradox

The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be...

30.07.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Mapping the optimal route between 2 quantum states

31.07.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

Monoamine oxidase A: biomarker for postpartum depression

31.07.2014 | Health and Medicine

Saving Seeds the Right Way Can Save the World's Plants

31.07.2014 | Life Sciences

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