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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 234,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 234,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Basel Physicists Develop Efficient Method of Signal Transmission from Nanocomponents

Physicists have developed an innovative method that could enable the efficient use of nanocomponents in electronic circuits. To achieve this, they have developed a layout in which a nanocomponent is connected to two electrical conductors, which uncouple the electrical signal in a highly efficient manner. The scientists at the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel have published their results in the scientific journal “Nature Communications” together with their colleagues from ETH Zurich.

Electronic components are becoming smaller and smaller. Components measuring just a few nanometers – the size of around ten atoms – are already being produced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Mesoporous Particles for the Development of Drug Delivery System Safe to Human Bodies

A research group at Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), succeeded in developing porous particles (mesoporous particles) consisting solely of phospholipids, a biological component, that are suitable for use as a drug delivery system.

A research group led by MANA Scientist Kohsaku Kawakami, postdoctoral researcher Shaoling Zhang and MANA Principal Investigator Katsuhiko Ariga, at the...

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Computing at the Speed of Light

Utah engineers take big step toward much faster computers

University of Utah engineers have taken a step forward in creating the next generation of computers and mobile devices capable of speeds millions of times...

22.05.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Development of Gold Nanoparticles That Control Osteogenic Differentiation of Stem Cells

Surface Modification by Carboxyl Groups Suppressing Osteogenic Differentiation. Nanomaterials Paving the Way for Regenerative Medicine

Tissue Regeneration Materials Unit at MANA, NIMS successfully developed gold nanoparticles that have functional surfaces and act on osteogenic differentiation...

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Nanobionics Supercharge Photosynthesis

Carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanoparticles enhance photosynthetic activity and stability

A new process has been developed for spontaneously incorporating and assembling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and oxygen scavenging nanoparticles into chloroplasts,...

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Nanospace-Controlled Gold Material Created Using Molecular Technology

Method Developed to Freely Adjust Pore Size in Nanoporous Gold Material

A research group led by Yusuke Yamauchi at National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in cooperation with other research organizations in Japan and...

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New Link Between Ocean Microbes and Atmosphere Uncovered

Microscopic-scale predator-prey relationship has global climate implications

A factor that determines the properties of clouds that help moderate the planet’s temperature may be decided in the oceans.

22.05.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

For pollock surveys in Alaska, things are looking up

To help estimate fish populations, scientists experiment with seafloor-mounted sonar systems that monitor fish in the water column above

Shelikof Strait, in the Gulf of Alaska, is an important spawning area for walleye pollock, the target of the largest--and one of the most valuable--fisheries...

22.05.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Mission possible: This device will self-destruct when heated

Where do electronics go when they die? Most devices are laid to eternal rest in landfills. But what if they just dissolved away, or broke down to their molecular components so that the material could be recycled?

University of Illinois researchers have developed heat-triggered self-destructing electronic devices, a step toward greatly reducing electronic waste and...

22.05.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NOAA's GOES-R satellite begins environmental testing

The GOES-R satellite, slated to launch in 2016, is ready for environmental testing. Environmental testing simulates the harsh conditions of launch and the space environment once the satellite is in orbit. The GOES-R satellite and its instruments will undergo a variety of rigorous tests which includes subjecting the satellite to vibration, acoustics and temperature testing as part of this process.

The environmental testing will take place at Lockheed Martin Corporation's Littleton, Colorado, facility where the spacecraft is being built. The satellite...

22.05.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Hubble observes one-of-a-kind star nicknamed 'Nasty'

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered surprising new clues about a hefty, rapidly aging star whose behavior has never been seen before in our Milky Way galaxy. In fact, the star is so weird that astronomers have nicknamed it "Nasty 1," a play on its catalog name of NaSt1. The star may represent a brief transitory stage in the evolution of extremely massive stars.

First discovered several decades ago, Nasty 1 was identified as a Wolf-Rayet star, a rapidly evolving star that is much more massive than our sun. The star...

22.05.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Penn researchers show that mental 'map' and 'compass' are two separate systems

If you have a map, you can know where you are without knowing which way you are facing. If you have a compass, you can know which way you're facing without knowing where you are. Animals from ants to mice to humans use both kinds of information to reorient themselves in familiar places, but how they determine this information from environmental cues is not well understood.

In a new study in mice, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that these systems work independently. A cue that unambiguously provided both...

22.05.2015 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

Savannahs help to slow climate change

Tropical rainforests have long been considered the Earth’s key ecosystem as they sequester a substantial amount of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, thereby slowing down the increasing greenhouse effect and climate change.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) exists naturally in the atmosphere, but it is also the greenhouse gas that is most altered by human activities, most notably fossil fuel...

22.05.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

An evolutionary heads-up – The brain size advantage

Animals with large brains are generally considered to be more intelligent and more successful than those with smaller brains. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna and Stockholm University have now provided the first experimental evidence that large brains provide an evolutionary advantage. In their study, large-brained female fish had a higher survival rate than those with small brains when faced with a predator, although brain size surprisingly did not influence male survival. The results were published in the prestigious journal Ecology Letters.

A larger brain brings better cognitive performance. And so it seems only logical that a larger brain would offer a higher survival potential. In the course of...

22.05.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Memories Influence Choice of Food

The stronger our memory is of a certain food, the more likely we are to choose it – even if it is the more unattractive option. Psychologists at the University of Basel conducted a study on how memory influences our choices by offering various foods and using scans to track brain activity. The researchers were able to show that the influence of memory is mediated by increasing communication between the relevant brain areas. The study has been published in the scientific journal Neuron.

Many of our everyday decisions such as “What present should I give my girlfriend?” or “Where shall we go to eat?” are based on the retrieval of relevant...

22.05.2015 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

A non-invasive tool for diagnosing cancer*

Researchers in Singapore have developed an ultrasensitive method to detect micro-RNAs: tiny molecules that can indicate the presence of tumours. They are applying the technology toward a non-invasive screening test for gastric cancer.

In 2012, 8.2 million lives were lost to cancer around the world. This number is expected to double by 2030. However, many cancer deaths could be prevented if...

21.05.2015 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Gamma ray camera may help with Fukushima decontamination*

Japanese researchers have significantly improved the performance of a gamma ray-imaging “Compton” camera. The new technology has potential applications in scientific research, medical treatment and environmental monitoring, as well as radioactive decontamination work.

Based on a high-sensitivity mobile gamma ray camera released by Hamamatsu Photonics in 2013, the new Compton camera incorporates high-accuracy,...

21.05.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Laser technology advances microchip production*

A new process for cutting silicon wafers could streamline the production of smaller and more powerful microchips for electronic devices.

Electronic chips are built on small pieces of silicon that are cut from silicon sheets, called wafers, in a process known as dicing. Currently, dicing is...

21.05.2015 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

Surviving Harsh Environments Becomes a Death-Trap for Specialist Corals

The success of corals that adapt to survive in the world’s hottest sea could contribute to their demise through global warming, according to new research.

21.05.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Ion Pingpong confirms magic neutron number of exotic atomic nuclei

An international team of scientists succeeded for the first time to determine the binding energies of the atomic nuclei of the exotic potassium isotopes 52K und 53K by mass spectrometry. The measurements at the European research center CERN were performed with a time-of-flight spectrometer built at the University of Greifswald. The new findings complement results reported two years ago about the corresponding calcium isotopes. They confirm the previously found new magic neutron number N=32. The experimental results as well as accompanying theoretical calculations are published in the international research journal Physical Review Letters in its latest issue (22. May 2015).

All atoms consist of electron shells and nuclei made up of protons and neutrons. The number of protons defines the chemical properties of the corresponding...

21.05.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

NASA analyzed the winds of Tropical Storm Ana

In mid-May 2015, Ana became the first named tropical storm of the North Atlantic hurricane season. May is early to see large storms in the Atlantic; the season begins in earnest on June 1. But on May 10, Tropical Storm Ana made landfall along the Carolina coast and carried maximum sustained winds of 74 kilometers per hour (46 miles per hour).

Scientists took the opportunity to observe Ana's wind dynamics with the International Space Station-Rapid Scatterometer (ISS-RapidScat). The instrument, which...

21.05.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

RWI/ISL Container Throughput Index: Moderate growth of world trade continues

In April, the Container Throughput Index of RWI and ISL increased slightly to 120.1 points from a revised 119.9 points in March.

This points towards an ongoing moderate expansion of world trade. The March value was adjusted upwards by a rather large amplitude of 0.8 points as special...

21.05.2015 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Defects can 'Hulk-up' materials

Berkeley lab study shows properly managed damage can boost material thermoelectric performances

In the story of the Marvel Universe superhero known as the Hulk, exposure to gamma radiation transforms scientist Bruce Banner into a far more powerful version...

21.05.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists tackle mystery of thunderstorms that strike at night

Researchers armed with more than 100 scientific instruments will spend six weeks this summer probing nocturnal thunderstorms on the Great Plains

Thunderstorms that form at night, without a prod from the Sun's heat, are a mysterious phenomenon. This summer scientists will be staying up late in search of...

21.05.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

International symposium: trends in spatial analysis and modelling for a more sustainable land use

20.05.2015 | Event News

15th conference of the International Association of Colloid and Interface Scientists

18.05.2015 | Event News

EHFG 2015: Securing health in Europe. Balancing priorities, sharing responsibilities

12.05.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Mesoporous Particles for the Development of Drug Delivery System Safe to Human Bodies

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences

Computing at the Speed of Light

22.05.2015 | Information Technology

Development of Gold Nanoparticles That Control Osteogenic Differentiation of Stem Cells

22.05.2015 | Materials Sciences

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