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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 251,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 251,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

Rice University lab's devices clarify how dispersants modify asphaltene to keep pipes open

It sounds cliché, but things do get worse before they get better when oil and gas lines are being cleared of contaminants, according to Rice University...

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

Researchers have discovered a new way to produce high energy photon beams. The new method makes it possible to produce these gamma rays in a highly efficient way, compared with today's technique. The obtained energy is a billion times higher than the energy of photons in visible light. These high intensity gamma rays significantly exceed all known limits, and pave the way towards new fundamental studies.

"When we exceed the limit of what is currently possible, we can see deeper into the basic elements of nature. We can dive into the deepest part of the atomic...

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

Vaccine under development provides the 'most comprehensive coverage' to date and alleviates antimicrobial concerns, new study finds

In 2004, pneumonia killed more than 2 million children worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. By 2015, the number was less than 1 million.

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

'Y' a protein unicorn might matter in glaucoma

So unheard of was what researchers discovered in a protein associated with glaucoma that for over two years they ran it through a gauntlet of lab tests and published a new research paper on it. The tests validated what they initially saw.

It was a Y-shape. That made it an extreme oddity significant to science, and possibly someday to medicine, too, particularly in the treatment of certain types...

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flying: Efficiency thanks to Lightweight Air Nozzles

The Federal Cluster of Excellence MERGE at Chemnitz University of Technology and the Fraunhofer ENAS join forces in order to optimise actuator systems for active flow control in aeroplanes and cars

Active flow control has nothing to do with flowing rivers and the dead wake is actually air, and not really dead at all. Basically speaking: “We investigate...

23.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Taming 'wild' electrons in graphene

Discovery could lead to novel electronic devices

Graphene - a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils - is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch:...

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Mountain glaciers shrinking across the West

Until recently, glaciers in the United States have been measured in two ways: placing stakes in the snow, as federal scientists have done each year since 1957 at South Cascade Glacier in Washington state; or tracking glacier area using photographs from airplanes and satellites.

We now have a third, much more powerful tool. While he was a doctoral student in University of Washington's Department of Earth and Space Sciences, David Shean...

23.10.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes

Small study offers proof of concept and support for wider research

Some scientists have suspected that the most common form of ovarian cancer may originate in the fallopian tubes, the thin fibrous tunnels that connect the...

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Exploring how herpes simplex virus changes when passed between family members

A new study explores how herpes simplex virus might change when passed from one individual to another, information that may prove useful in future development of therapeutics and vaccines. This rare glimpse into a transmission event reveals nearly perfect genetic transmission of the virus from a father to his son and lays the foundation for future studies exploring the genetic diversity of this virus. A paper describing the study appears online October 20, 2017, in the journal Scientific Reports.

"Millions of people worldwide have herpes simplex virus," said Moriah Szpara, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State and an...

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Key discoveries offer significant hope of reversing antibiotic resistance

Resistance to antibiotics is becoming increasingly prevalent and threatens to undermine healthcare systems across the globe. Antibiotics including penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems are known as β-lactams and are the most commonly prescribed worldwide.

In the first paper, University of Bristol researchers defined the relative importance of two mechanisms associated with β-lactam antibiotic resistance. In one,...

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Creation of coherent states in molecules by incoherent electrons

In a breakthrough experiment using a novel negative ion momentum imaging technique, researchers from Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai India and Open University, Milton Kyenes, UK have shown -- for the first time -- that incoherent electrons displaying their quantum mechanical nature, can induce coherence in molecular systems on attachment.

Their latest results published in the Journal, Nature Physics (DOI: 10.1038/nphys4289), show that the coherence induced by the capture of single electron by...

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Introduction of a novel system for in vitro analyses of zebrafish oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

Introduction of a novel, easy-to-use and highly reproducible culture system for in vitro analyses of zebrafish oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs)

Dr. Michell M. Reimer, group leader at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and his team introduce a...

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Did you know how many parts of your car require infrared heat?

A car should drive and look good. The car paint should shine, the windows must fit perfectly and especially the airbag has to function reliably. Infrared heat is responsible for a significant amount of these processes.

At least 200 parts of a car will benefit from infrared heat technology during its manufacturing process.

Drivers need a quiet cabin, a well-functioning heater for the winter or air-conditioning during the hot summer months, and - in case of an emergency - the...

23.10.2017 | Automotive Engineering | nachricht Read more

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

Brown University researchers have demonstrated a way to bring a powerful form of spectroscopy -- a technique used to study a wide variety of materials -- into the nano-world.

Laser terahertz emission microscopy (LTEM) is a burgeoning means of characterizing the performance of solar cells, integrated circuits and other systems and...

20.10.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

The ICN2 Oxide Nanophysics Group led by ICREA Prof. Gustau Catalán has recently published the latest findings from their research line on flexoelectricity in Advanced Materials.

PhD student Kumara Cordero-Edwards is the lead author of this work, carried out in collaboration with researchers from the Autonomous University of Barcelona...

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has uncovered a direct link between sample quality and the degree of valley polarization in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). In contrast with graphene, many monolayer TMDs are semiconductors and show promise for future applications in electronic and optoelectronic technologies.

In this sense, a 'valley' refers to the region in an electronic band structure where both electrons and holes are localized, and 'valley polarization' refers...

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds

Researchers from the Faculties of Chemistry and of Materials Science of Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed a new way of increasing the sensitivity of detecting volatile compounds, especially chlorine, using metallic nanoparticles. The work has been published in the Talanta journal.

Metallic nanoparticles, in particular the nanoparticles of gold and silver, are widely used in analytical chemistry. Amongst their uses is creating optical...

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

New research suggests that the boundary between South American tropical rainforests and savannas is influenced by the depth to which plants can root. Shallow rooting depth promotes the establishment of savannas. Previous research has shown that precipitation and fire mediate tropical forest and savanna distributions. The study shows that below ground conditions need to be considered to understand the distribution of terrestrial vegetation both historically and in the face of future climate change. The study by researchers of the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre and Goethe University is based on computer vegetation models and was published in “Journal of Biogeography”.

There are models and there is the reality; and in some cases they just don’t match. This is what Liam Langan and his team at the Senckenberg Biodiversity and...

20.10.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

How Obesity Promotes Breast Cancer

Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. Scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technische Universität München (TUM), and Heidelberg University Hospital report on this in ‘Cell Metabolism’. The team has already been able to halt this mechanism with an antibody treatment.

The number of people with obesity is increasing rapidly worldwide. The German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) recently reported that according to the WHO the...

20.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How the smallest bacterial pathogens outwit host immune defences by stealth mechanisms

Despite their relatively small genome in comparison to other bacteria, mycoplasmas can cause persistent and often difficult-to-treat infections in humans and animals. An extensive study by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna has now shown how mycoplasmas escape the immune response despite their minimal “genetic arsenal”. Mycoplasmas “mask” themselves. They use their small genome in such a clever strategic way that they can even compensate for the loss of an enzyme that is important for this process. This could be shown for the first time in vivo in a living host organism, thus representing a breakthrough in the research of this special group of bacterial pathogens.

Mycoplasmas are very simple bacteria. They have a minimalist genome and no protective cell wall. Nevertheless, they are common and successful pathogens that...

20.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New NASA study improves search for habitable worlds

New NASA research is helping to refine our understanding of candidate planets beyond our solar system that might support life.

"Using a model that more realistically simulates atmospheric conditions, we discovered a new process that controls the habitability of exoplanets and will...

20.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

The birth of a new protein

A yeast protein that evolved from scratch can fold into a three-dimensional shape--contrary to the general understanding of young proteins--according to new research led by the University of Arizona.

Scientists thought such newly evolved proteins were works-in-progress that could not fold into complex shapes the way more ancient proteins do.

20.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Cleaning up? Not without helpers

Freiburg scientists explain assembly and transport function of ‘old‘ calcium pumps by ‘new‘ partner proteins

Calcium-ATPases convey calcium ions (Ca2+) from the cytoplasm to the extracellular space via active transport (using ATP as an energy source), and thus...

20.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

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