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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 228,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 228,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Rosetta-Mission: The incredible flight of the lander »Philae«

Data of the „ROMAP“-Magentometer aids in reconstruction of flight path

Just a little time after Rosetta lander „Philae“ touched down on a comet it was clear that the mission was not continuing as expected, because the lander...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

New substance overcomes treatment-resistance in leukaemia

Haematologists from Frankfurt, working with a Russian pharmaceutical company, have developed a new active substance that effectively combats the most aggressive forms of Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukaemia.

The chances of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukaemia (Ph+) being cured has greatly increased in recent years. Nevertheless, a high...

28.11.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

How to Save Billions of Gallons of Gasoline

Scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory study potential of drag-reducing devices on semi-trucks to conserve billions of gallons, save tens of billions of dollars and spare tens of millions of tons of CO2

Each year, the more than 2 million tractor-trailer trucks that cruise America's highways consume about 36 billion gallons of diesel fuel, representing more...

28.11.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NEIKER is studying the impact of climate change on the soil ecosystem

The Basque Institute for Agricultural Research and Development NEIKER-Tecnalia has had a Microbial Observatory in the Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Nature Reserve (Huesca Pyrenees) since 2011.

Its purpose is to evaluate the impact of climate change on the ecosystems of the soil by monitoring its microbial properties over time. The research areas are...

28.11.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Ancient marine algae provides clues of climate change im pact on today’s microscopic ocean organisms

A study of ancient marine algae, led by the University of Southampton, has found that climate change affected their growth and skeleton structure, which has potential significance for today’s equivalent microscopic organisms that play an important role in the world’s oceans.

Coccolithophores, a type of marine algae, are prolific in the ocean today and have been for millions of years. These single-celled plankton produce calcite...

28.11.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

MEERA (Malaysian Eco-Friendly & Economical Rainwater Accumulator)

Rainwater collection system to be used by residential houses in countries with abundant rainfall.

During severe drought, tap water may sometimes be rationed. Many household then tend to collect rainwater to supplement their water needs.

28.11.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Mosquitoes and malaria: Scientists pinpoint how biting cousins have grown apart

Certain species of mosquitoes are genetically better at transmitting malaria than even some of their close cousins, according to a multi-institutional team of researchers including Virginia Tech scientists.

Of about 450 different species of mosquitoes in the Anopheles genus, only about 60 can transmit the Plasmodium malaria parasite that is harmful to people. The...

28.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stroke damage mechanism identified

Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims--and are now searching for drugs to block it.

Strokes happen when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off but much of the harm to survivors' memory and other cognitive function is often actually...

28.11.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Another human footprint in the ocean

Rising anthropogenic nitrate levels in the North Pacific Ocean

Human-induced changes to Earth's carbon cycle - for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification - have been observed for decades....

28.11.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals

New catalysts designed and investigated by Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from other university and national laboratories have the potential to greatly reduce processing costs in future fuels, such as hydrogen.

The catalysts are composed of a unique structure of single gold atoms bound by oxygen to several sodium or potassium atoms and supported on non-reactive silica...

28.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Economical landfill gas treatment

On-site regeneration of activated carbon for gas treatment

Landfill gas sourced from landfill sites and sewage treatment plants can also be burned in combined heat and power plants and used for energy purposes in place...

28.11.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Love at first smell: Can birds choose mates by their odors?

Mate choice is often the most important decision in the lives of humans and animals. Scientists at the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology at the Vetmeduni Vienna have found the first evidence that birds may choose their mate through odor.

The researchers compared the preen gland chemicals of black-legged kittiwakes with genes that play a role in immunity. Kittiwakes that smell similarly to each...

28.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Education is key to climate adaptation

According to new IIASA research, education makes people less vulnerable to natural disasters such as floods, landslides, and storms that are expected to intensify with climate change.

Given that some climate change is already unavoidable—as just confirmed by the new IPCC report—investing in empowerment through universal education should be...

28.11.2014 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

SLU Researcher Finds an Off Switch for Pain

Activating the Adenosine A3 Receptor Subtype Is Key to Powerful Pain Relief

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National...

27.11.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip

Device could improve wireless communications systems

During a thunderstorm, we all know that it is common to hear thunder after we see the lightning. That’s because sound travels much slower (768 miles per hour)...

27.11.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Tropical Depression 21W Forms, Philippines Under Warnings

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite provided rainfall data as Tropical Depression 21W was making landfall in the southern Philippines on Nov. 26.

TRMM revealed areas of heavy rainfall in fragmented bands east of the center of circulation, where rain was falling at more than 1 inch (25 mm) per hour.

27.11.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

E-Voting: Risky technology or great improvement?

On this forthcoming weekend the Australian state election takes place, and in Victoria State they will be using a new e-voting system to improve secrecy, reliability and user-friendliness. But how secure are such systems? And do people trust such systems?

These are key questions for Prof. Peter Y A Ryan, e-voting expert at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliability and Trust (SnT) from the University...

27.11.2014 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Copper on the Brain at Rest

In recent years it has been established that copper plays an essential role in the health of the human brain. Improper copper oxidation has been linked to several neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Menkes’ and Wilson’s.

Copper has also been identified as a critical ingredient in the enzymes that activate the brain’s neurotransmitters in response to stimuli. Now a new study by...

27.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Giammar Seeking New Solutions for Underground Carbon Storage

Dan Giammar, PhD, at Washington University in St. Louis, is going deep into the earth to find a potential solution to store carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Giammar, professor in energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, has been working with the Consortium for...

27.11.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Most People with Dementia Never Have Screening

The majority of people with dementia have never seen a doctor about their memory and thinking problems, according to a new study published in the November 26, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

In the study, 55 percent of the people with dementia had never had an evaluation of their thinking and memory skills with a doctor.

27.11.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

NIH Scientists Determine How Environment Contributes to Several Human Diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures.

These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. The work, appearing online Nov. 17 in the journal...

27.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How do our muscles work?

MFPL scientists reveal important new insights into muscle protein

Scientists led by Kristina Djinović-Carugo at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna have...

27.11.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Matched “hybrid” systems may hold key to wider use of renewable energy

The use of renewable energy in the United States could take a significant leap forward with improved storage technologies or more efforts to “match” different forms of alternative energy systems that provide an overall more steady flow of electricity, researchers say in a new report.

Historically, a major drawback to the use and cost-effectiveness of alternative energy systems has been that they are too variable – if the wind doesn’t blow...

27.11.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NASA's Van Allen Probes Spot an Impenetrable Barrier in Space

Two donuts of seething radiation that surround Earth, called the Van Allen radiation belts, have been found to contain a nearly impenetrable barrier that prevents the fastest, most energetic electrons from reaching Earth.

The Van Allen belts are a collection of charged particles, gathered in place by Earth’s magnetic field. They can wax and wane in response to incoming energy...

27.11.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Event News

Regional economic cooperation in Central Asia

21.11.2014 | Event News

Educating the Ecucators

13.11.2014 | Event News

36th Annual IATUL Conference 2015: Call for papers and posters

12.11.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

New substance overcomes treatment-resistance in leukaemia

28.11.2014 | Health and Medicine

How to Save Billions of Gallons of Gasoline

28.11.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering

NEIKER is studying the impact of climate change on the soil ecosystem

28.11.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

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