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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 223,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 223,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast

Vibrate a solution of rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they'll spin around their long axes like tiny drill bits. Why?

No one yet knows exactly. But researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have clocked their speed—and it's fast. At up to 150,000...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Modular system for many materials

Lightweight construction materials are gaining ground throughout industry and are powering their way into many everyday products from aerospace through oil and gas extraction to the automotive industry. If serial manufacture is to be efficient and cost-effective, however, it is vital to automate the manufacturing processes for lightweight components.

The Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT is gearing up for action with its “Multi-Material-Head”, a configurable tape placement system for the...

24.07.2014 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Software Provides a Clear Overview in Long Documents

In the future, a software will help users better analyze long texts such as the documents for calls for bids, which are often more than one thousand pages long.

Experts at Siemens' global research unit Corporate Technology have developed a search function that enables users to simultaneously look for key words and...

24.07.2014 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Size and Age of Plants Impact Their Productivity More Than Climate, UA Study Shows

The size and age of plants have more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, according to a landmark study by University of Arizona researchers.

UA professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz, along with collaborators Dongliang Cheng from Fujian Normal University in China and Drew...

24.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

All-Clear for Nonlinear Optical Imaging

High power femto-second laser pulses used for in vivo nonlinear optical imaging can form DNA products, which may lead to carcinogenesis. A modified cancer risk model now shows that the cancer risk is negligible above that due to regular sun exposure.

In the field of biomedical imaging, nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging is gaining importance for applications such as visualizing collagen, elastin and cellular...

24.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Monitoring Pulse After Stroke May Prevent a Second Stroke

New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a stroke or the pulse of a loved one who has experienced a stroke may be a simple and effective first step in detecting irregular heartbeat, a major cause of having a second stroke. The study is published in the July 23, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“Screening pulse is the method of choice for checking for irregular heartbeat for people over age 65 who have never had a stroke. Our study shows it may be a...

24.07.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Freezing Blueberries Improves Antioxidant Availability

Frozen blueberries pack more powerful antioxidant punch

Blueberries pack a powerful antioxidant punch, whether eaten fresh or from the freezer, according to South Dakota State University graduate Marin Plumb.

24.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

York U researchers use innovative bird ‘backpacks’ to put wood thrush migration on the map

Migratory songbirds are disappearing, and though conservationists are examining several possible reasons such as climate change, loss of habitat, acid rain and light pollution, a key piece of the puzzle has remained missing: where do these birds go once they leave their breeding sites, and what threats may they be encountering along the way?

To answer this question, a team of researchers out of York University have created the first ever migratory connectivity map produced for a songbird, using...

24.07.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

ETH student develops filter for clean water around the world

Roughly 780 million people around the world have no access to clean drinking water. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 3.4 million people die from water-related diseases every year.

ETH student Jeremy Nussbaumer set himself the goal of making a contribution to solving this problem. Working with researchers from a group led by Wendelin...

24.07.2014 | Innovative Products | nachricht Read more

Diseases of Another Kind

In a new paper, UCSB researchers scrutinize a distinctive and prevalent type of infectious agent

The drought that has the entire country in its grip is affecting more than the color of people’s lawns. It may also be responsible for the proliferation of a...

24.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Voyager spacecraft might not have reached interstellar space

In 2012, the Voyager mission team announced that the Voyager 1 spacecraft had passed into interstellar space, traveling further from Earth than any other manmade object.

But, in the nearly two years since that historic announcement, and despite subsequent observations backing it up, uncertainty about whether Voyager 1 really...

24.07.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Climate change and the soil

Climate warming may not drive net losses of soil carbon from tropical forests

The planet's soil releases about 60 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, which is far more than that released by burning fossil fuels. This...

24.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging

Medicine focuses almost entirely on fighting chronic diseases in a piecemeal fashion as symptoms develop. Instead, more efforts should be directed to promoting interventions that have the potential to prevent multiple chronic diseases and extend healthy lifespans.

Researchers writing in the journal Nature say that by treating the metabolic and molecular causes of human aging, it may be possible to help people stay...

24.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury

UCI Reeve-Irvine researchers identify novel combination treatment

 A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired...

24.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Satellite Shows Atlantic Tropical Depression Degenerate

NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured imagery of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Depression 2 is it degenerated into a tropical wave on July 23.

At 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT), NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured an image of what was once Tropical Depression 2 (TD2), about 400 miles east of the Lesser...

24.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Study links autistic behaviors to enzyme

UC Riverside-led mouse study shows that deleting the enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with Fragile X syndrome

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well...

24.07.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Fires in the Northern Territories July 2014

Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires.

In the image taken by the Aqua satellite, the smoke is drifting eastward along normal wind patterns.  Fire is an obvious health hazard, but the smoke that...

24.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA Sees Typhoon Matmo Making Second Landfall in China

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Typhoon Matmo when it was moving through the Taiwan Strait for its final landfall in mainland China.

On July 23 at 02:45 UTC (July 22 at 10:45 p.m. EDT), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite...

24.07.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Targeting the brain to treat obesity

Focus therapies on areas of memory and learning, AU researchers say

Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University's...

24.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How honey bees stay cool

Honey bees, especially the young, are highly sensitive to temperature and to protect developing bees, adults work together to maintain temperatures within a narrow range.

Honey bees, especially the young, are highly sensitive to temperature and to protect developing bees, adults work together to maintain temperatures within a...

24.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Spinach could lead to alternative energy more powerful than Popeye

Spinach gave Popeye super strength, but it also holds the promise of a different power for a group of scientists: the ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative fuel.

Purdue University physicists are part of an international group using spinach to study the proteins involved in photosynthesis, the process by which plants...

24.07.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says

Buy the latest electronic gizmo du jour, or use that money to fix a leaky roof? Go out with friends, or stay home to catch-up on work to meet that looming deadline? And after you've finished that big project, do you treat yourself to a slice of chocolate cake or settle for a piece of fruit?

These are the kind of self-control dilemmas that people face all the time. And according to research from a University of Illinois expert in new product...

24.07.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Smarter Than a First-Grader?

UCSB researcher shows that New Caledonian crows can perform as well as 7- to 10-year-olds on cause-and-effect water displacement tasks

In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level ... 24.07.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stronger early reading skills predict higher intelligence later

A new study of identical twins has found that early reading skill might positively affect later intellectual abilities. The study, in the journal Child Development, was conducted by researchers at the University of Edinburgh and King's College London.

"Since reading is an ability that can be improved, our findings have implications for reading instruction," according to Stuart J. Ritchie, research fellow in...

24.07.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Modular system for many materials

24.07.2014 | Materials Sciences

Software Provides a Clear Overview in Long Documents

24.07.2014 | Information Technology

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