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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 253,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 253,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

Regulating the lipid and physical asymmetry of a cell's membrane is critical to immune cell function, and researchers have now shown that by preventing loss of membrane asymmetry it's possible to control the immune response.

A cell's membrane is its natural barrier between the inside of a cell and the outside world -- composed of a double layer (bilayer) of lipids (such as fats,...

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

An MRI breast imaging technique that requires no contrast agent, combined with sophisticated data analysis, could reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study appearing online in the journal Radiology.

Breast MRI currently is used to screen women at high risk of breast cancer and as a diagnostic adjunct to mammography. The examination relies on...

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. In an international collaboration with IBM Research in San Jose, USA, using advanced and novel techniques, QNS scientists identified which mechanisms destroy the quantum properties of individual atoms by manipulating the magnetic state of a single iron atom on a thin insulator. Using a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, which utilizes an atomically sharp metal tip, they were able to precisely image individual iron atoms and measure and control the time that the iron atom can maintain its quantum behavior.

Their findings, published in the journal Science Advances, show that the loss in quantum state superposition is mainly caused by nearby electrons that the...

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New printing technique uses cells and molecules to recreate biological structures

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a printing technique using cells and molecules normally found in natural tissues to create constructs that resemble biological structures.

These structures are embedded in an ink which is similar to their native environment and opens the possibility to make them behave as they would in the body.

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New tech for commercial Lithium-ion batteries finds they can be charged 5 times fast

Researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick have developed a new direct, precise test of Lithium-ion batteries’ internal temperatures and their electrodes potentials and found that the batteries can be safely charged up to five times faster than the current recommended charging limits.

The new technology works in-situ during a battery's normal operation without impeding its performance and it has been tested on standard commercially available...

20.02.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Hidden talents: Converting heat into electricity with pencil and paper

The thermoelectric effect is nothing new - it was discovered almost 200 years ago by Thomas J. Seebeck. If two different metals are brought together, then an electrical voltage can develop if one metal is warmer than the other. This effect allows residual heat to be partially converted into electrical energy. Residual heat is a by-product of almost all technological and natural processes, such as in power plants and every household appliance, and the human body as well. It is one of the largest underutilised energy sources in the world - and usually goes completely unused.

Tiny effect

20.02.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Rare find from the deep sea

Dumbo octopuses live at a depth of thousands of meters in the oceans. A rare spectacle now provides further insight into this extraordinary habitat: a US scientist filmed a dumbo octopus measuring just a few centimeters hatching from its egg. Based on these video recordings and MRI scans of the internal organs, researchers from the Delaware Museum of Natural History, the University of Bonn, the University Hospital Münster, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution were able to document a surprising similarity of the hatchling with adult animals. The find is now being presented in “Current Biology”.

The remotely operated vehicle surfaces again, and this time it has brought up a cold-water coral from a depth of almost 2,000 meters (ca. 6,600 feet). On board...

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatings

Researchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colours in nature. The paper, published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural colour - as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers - and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally coloured organisms.

The study is a collaboration between the University of Cambridge and Dutch company Hoekmine BV and shows how genetics can change the colour, and appearance, of...

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Observing and controlling ultrafast processes with attosecond resolution

Many chemical processes run so fast that they are only roughly understood. To clarify these processes, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a methodology with a resolution of quintillionths of a second. The new technology stands to help better understand processes like photosynthesis and develop faster computer chips.

An important intermediary step in many chemical processes is ionization. A typical example of this is photosynthesis. The reactions take only a few...

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color quality

A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has used data mining and computational tools to discover a new phosphor material for white LEDs that is inexpensive and easy to make. Researchers built prototype white LED light bulbs using the new phosphor. The prototypes exhibited better color quality than many commercial LEDs currently on the market.

Researchers published the new phosphor on Feb. 19 in the journal Joule.

Phosphors, which are substances that emit light, are one of the key ingredients to make white LEDs. They are crystalline powders that absorb energy from blue...

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

A single molecule can behave as the smallest electronic component of an electronic system. With this premise in mind, researchers in the field of molecular electronics have endeavoured in the last years to develop new approaches that bring closer the long-awaited objective of using molecules as electronic logic components.

And one of the most recent steps forward is appearing today on peer-reviewed journal Science Advances, as a result of a new collaboration between physicists...

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

When Proteins Shake Hands

Materials scientists from Jena (Germany) create innovative nanomaterial from natural substances

Be it in spider silk, wood, the spaces between body cells, in tendons, or as a natural sealant for small wounds: protein fibres are found virtually everywhere...

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

A critically important intercellular communication system is found to encode and transmit more messages than previously thought.

Multicellular organisms like ourselves depend on a constant flow of information between cells, coordinating their activities in order to proliferate and...

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer HHI presents latest VR and 5G technologies at Mobile World Congress

At Mobile World Congress 2018, Fraunhofer HHI presents the latest developments in Virtual Reality (VR) video streaming and wireless communications at Fraunhofer Booth G31, Hall 7.

5G: mobile networks of the next Generation

19.02.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display

Device displays electrocardiogram recorded by skin sensor, holds promise for home healthcare applications

A new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode...

19.02.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Dispersal of Fish Eggs by Water Birds – Just a Myth?

How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can’t swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters – however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.

Small lakes with a surface area of less than 100 m2 represent the majority of global freshwater ecosystems. Many of these lakes are found in remote, often...

19.02.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells

Researchers at UC San Francisco uncover the architecture of the spindle pole body in yeast.

Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs)...

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the future

They have probably succeeded in creating a topological superconductor

With their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that...

19.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease

Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease.

The international team, led by the University of Cambridge, found that calcium can mediate the interaction between small membranous structures inside nerve...

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering

When to model nature in engineering and when perhaps not to: AAAS annual meeting presentation

Bees? Great. Ants? Hit or miss. Slime mold amoebas? Fail. Though nature offers excellent design inspirations in some information technology systems, in other...

19.02.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer HHI put into operation first volumetric video studio on the European continent

Fraunhofer HHI has put into operation, after several years of development, a volumetric video studio. Since that time, three professional commissioned productions have already been carried out in this studio. The studio, serves primarily as an experimental laboratory with the purpose to further develop the basic technology of “3D Human Body Reconstruction (3D HBR)” – an innovative procedure that enables a realistic authentic 3D image of moving persons in virtual worlds. The commercial use of the developed technology is therefore to be taken over, in the short term, by VoluCap GmbH (Volumetric Capture Studio Babelsberg GmbH) in Potsdam-Babelsberg.

The necessity to relocate the commercial production to a company is due in particular to the rapid market development of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented...

19.02.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

What is insight the tomato? Breeding has had influenced the chemical composition of tomato fruits

Plant cultivation and breeding was the foundation of humans’ sedentary lifestyle. But how did the human influence affect plants and their chemical constitution? Researchers from China, USA, Bulgaria and Germany, among them is Alisdair Fernie of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology (MPI-MP) in Potsdam, Germany, asked themselves this question and chose tomato for their detailed analyses. The aim of their work was to gain new insights into breeding and their consequences. The researchers analysed the metabolic constitution and the genetic background of the fruits. They published an overview about the human influence on the chemical composition of a crop for the first time.

Tomatoes and their wild relatives

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How the insulin receptor works

As we are approaching the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, a wide array of its signaling pathways has been defined. However, the initial step in insulin action, i.e. the engagement with its cell-surface receptor and the resulting conformational change, which propagates across the plasma membrane to the intracellular module, remains poorly understood. Addressing this problem, researchers from the Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden of the Helmholtz Zentrum München at the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of TU Dresden together with colleagues from Rockefeller University New York succeeded for the first time in the visualization of the insulin receptor activation.

Insulin exerts multiple effects on cellular metabolism and growth. The biological actions of insulin are mediated by a cell-surface receptor, called insulin...

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

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