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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 255,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 255,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

UChicago researchers use quantum simulations to more accurately predict water properties

Deep inside the Earth exist pockets of water, but the liquid there isn't like the water on the surface.

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

What are the effects of coral reef marine protected areas?

How can tropical coral reefs be protected effectively? An international team of 37 scientists from around the world studied nearly 1,800 coral reefs to determine the effectiveness of protective measures in areas with varying degrees of human influence. The study comprises data collected over a period of nine years and was published this week in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

With his research on coral reefs off the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, reef ecologist Dr. Sebastian Ferse from the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The Janus head of the South Asian monsoon

The world's largest weather phenomenon efficiently purifies the air of pollutants, but also distributes them across the globe

The same phenomenon recurs every year. During the dry season, in winter, burning fossil fuels and biomass in South Asia creates a huge pollution haze: the...

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The world's tiniest first responders

'Walking molecules" haul away damaged DNA to the cell's emergency room

The cell has its own paramedic team and emergency room to aid and repair damaged DNA, a new USC Dornsife study reveals.

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new toxin in Cholera bacteria discovered by scientists in Umeå

Scientists affiliated with MIMS and UCMR describe their findings about a new toxin and its secretion mechanism from the major bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae in a recent publication in the journal Communications Biology (7 June 2018).

The bacterium Vibrio cholerae was discovered more than 150 years ago but remains as one of the main causes of bacterial infectious disease globally, especially...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibiotics

In the July 2018 issue of SLAS Discovery, a review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics.

Authors Bas Lamoree and Roderick E. Hubbard of the University of York (UK) explain how FBLD works and illustrate its advantages over conventional...

21.06.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

The secret of the soybean: Mainz researchers are investigating oil bodies in soybeans

Mainz researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have used neutron scattering to study small oil bodies in soybeans. These serve the bean when budding and growing as an energy supplier. They are also used in the production of soybean oils. With their investigations, the scientists headed by Prof. Thomas Vilgis (MPI-P, Department of Prof. Kurt Kremer) studied the structure and thus the mechanical stability of these oil bodies. One possible application of their research results is the production of new and innovative foods on a natural basis.

Water and oil do not mix - this is an experience of everyday life. In order to mix water with oil, so-called "emulsifier agents" are needed. One of these is...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy: creating microelectrode arrays on soft materials

Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.

Researchers from TUM and Forschungszentrum Jülich have successfully teamed up to perform inkjet printing onto a gummy bear. This might initially sound like...

21.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Proteins with different evolutionary histories now do the same job

University of Tübingen researchers discover convergent evolution in mitochondria in fungi and single-celled parasites

Mitochondria are essential organelles of cells with a nucleus – known as eukaryotic cells. These are the cells which make up fungi, plants, and animals...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Creating a new composite fuel for new-generation fast reactors

Lobachevsky University scientists are also developing new materials for immobilizing radioactive waste

Joint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit

The research, led by Dr Victor Sans Sangorrin from the Faculty of Engineering and Dr Graham Newton from the School of Chemistry, is published in the academic journal, Advanced Materials.

"This bottom-up approach to device fabrication will push the boundaries of additive manufacturing like never before. Using a unique integrated design approach,...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?

New material has optical properties that could enable better infrared detection for autonomous vehicles and assist firefighters

One of the leading challenges for autonomous vehicles is to ensure that they can detect and sense objects--even through dense fog. Compared to the current...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Innovative autonomous system for identifying schools of fish

Our eyes on the seabed

The University of Haifa (Israel) and two teams from the IMDEA Networks Institute have developed an innovative autonomous system, SYMBIOSIS, to monitor...

20.06.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures

System enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems

Getting robots to do things isn't easy: usually scientists have to either explicitly program them or get them to understand how humans communicate via language.

20.06.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performance

Researchers more than doubled the ability of a material to convert heat into electricity, which could help reduce the amount of wasted heat, and thus wasted fossil fuel, in daily activities and industries.

Researchers from Hokkaido University and their colleagues in Japan and Taiwan have improved the ability to transform wasted heat into usable electricity by...

20.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Intelligent maps will help robots navigate in your home

Automated mobile robots have the capacity to help us with many service tasks, such as home care assistance or moving goods in a warehouse. Since robots lack human senses, they depend on sensors and other sources for navigation. New research from Halmstad University in Sweden suggests methods for enabling robots to better understand and become more aware of their surroundings, so that they can efficiently adapt their movements in a complex work space.

”In a workspace where robots and humans operate side by side, it is important that the robots are ’well-behaved’ and aware of their surroundings. Semantic maps...

20.06.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

An unlikely marriage among oxides

Sebastian Siol is looking for new materials with unusual properties that were so far not accessible in experiments. To do this, he connects partners who don't really fit together: One partner forces the other into a state that would not be possible without the unlikely pairing. Siol also makes sure that the crystal bonds last in everyday life. Only then are they interesting for industrial applications.

The term alloy usually refers to a mixture of several metals. However, other materials can also be alloyed. In the semiconductor industry, for instance, oxide...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tag it EASI – a new method for accurate protein analysis

Protein analysis is becoming an increasingly important tool on the road towards personalized medicine. The method of choice for this purpose is mass spectrometry. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried have developed a new labelling method for proteins called EASI-Tag. The new method makes it possible to analyze multiple samples at the same time using conventional mass spectrometers. Unlike earlier approaches, EASI-Tag is able to detect quantitative differences between samples extremely accurately. The method has now been presented in the scientific journal Nature Methods.

In recent years, researchers have realized that analyzing genetic information is not enough to understand cellular processes in healthy or diseased cells,...

20.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Dry landscapes can increase disease transmission

In water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.

Sick individuals often behave differently. For example, they usually sleep more and eat less. Accordingly, one could expect that sick individuals have less...

20.06.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Agrophotovoltaics Goes Global: from Chile to Vietnam

Agrophotovoltaics (APV), a technology which combines the production of solar electricity and crops on the same land, has already been successfully demonstrated in pilot projects in several European countries. The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE in cooperation with the Innovation Group “APV-Resola” have proven the feasibility of Agrophotovoltaics with a 194 kWp APV pilot system realized on a farm near Lake Constance in Germany. The project results showed that APV increases the land-use efficiency by 60 percent.

“The next step is to establish a proof of concept for the APV system technology in developing and threshold countries. Due to the higher levels of solar...

20.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials.

"We are particularly interested in advances in nanotube integration into photonic cavities for manipulating and optimizing light-emission properties," said...

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

Researchers at the University of Basel’s Biozentrum have developed a method for tracing the movement of proteins within the cell. They tagged proteins with tiny nanosensors, so-called nanobodies, which enable the scientists to live track and trace the proteins' pathway through the cell. The method described in the current issue of PNAS is suitable for a wide range of research purposes.

Membrane proteins are a basic component of each individual cell of the human body and play a vital role in the cell’s structure, metabolism and transport. They...

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New material for splitting water

A promising new material has the right properties to capture solar energy and split water into hydrogen and oxygen.

Solar energy is clean and abundant. But when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis -- in...

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

What are the effects of coral reef marine protected areas?

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences

The Janus head of the South Asian monsoon

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

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