Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 236,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 236,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: How wind sculpted Earth's largest dust deposit

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from University of Arizona geoscientists. The study is the first to explain how the steep-fronted plateau formed.

China's Loess Plateau was formed by wind alternately depositing dust or removing dust over the last 2.6 million years, according to a new report from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Tiny Drops of Early Universe 'Perfect' Fluid

First results from collisions of three-particle ions with gold nuclei reveal clear-cut evidence of primordial soup's signature particle flow

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle collider for nuclear physics research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National...

02.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Learning from Nature: Genomic database standard alleviates search for novel antibiotics

Penicillin, an antibiotic discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928, is well known. While Fleming noticed the effect of this compound by pure chance, nowadays the quest for novel agents relies on systematic research.

Meanwhile scientists identified many more secondary metabolites like Erythromycin, an antibacterial drug. The enormous relevance of these natural products in...

02.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Cosmic recycling

Deeply immersed in this huge stellar nursery are three clusters of hot young stars -- only a few million years old -- which glow brightly in ultraviolet light. It is the light from these stars that causes the nebula's gas clouds to glow. The radiation strips electrons from atoms -- a process known as ionisation -- and when they recombine they release energy in the form of light. Each chemical element emits light in characteristic colours and the large clouds of hydrogen in the nebula are the cause of its rich red glow.

Gum 56 -- also known as IC 4628 or by its nickname, the Prawn Nebula -- is named after the Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum, who, in 1955, published a...

02.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in Germany

Study shows how Germany can decarbonize its energy system and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 80% until 2050

In order to take an important step towards limiting global warming to less than 2 °C compared to pre-industrial times, countries are expected to achieve a new...

02.09.2015 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

How to get rid of a satellite after its retirement

Researchers at University of La Rioja (Spain) have developed a new method to eliminate artificial satellites in Highly Elliptical Orbits when they finish their mission. The methodology, which allows for a reduction of both cost and risk, has been tested with the European Space Agency INTEGRAL mission, which will re-enter into the Earth's atmosphere in order to disintegrate in 2029.

The problem of space debris is one of the main challenges that aerospace engineers have to face, due to the danger it poses to satellites. In this context,...

02.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Expanded CNC programming software for operations planning, training and sales

EMO 2015 – Hall 3, Booth E06/F03

  • Sinutrain 4.7 CNC programming station with controller identical to Sinumerik machine tool controllers with new, practical functions
  • Workbench interface with virtual machine hall as home page
  • DXF Reader imports CAD data and simplifies program creation
  • Simple loading of CNC machine data from commissioning archive
  • Training packages for students and training institutes, as well as a free basic version for training and sales

In Sinutrain version 4.7, Siemens has simplified its Windows PC-based offline programming software for machine tools, and equipped it with new, practical...

02.09.2015 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Orang-utan females prefer cheek-padded males

Dominant, cheek-padded orang-utan males are significantly more successful at fathering offspring – except in times of rank instability

Unlike most mammals, male orang-utans express one of two distinct morphological forms: some develop large “cheek pads” on their faces; others do not. A team of...

02.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

VIMS reports intense and widespread algal blooms

Researchers explore new tools to monitor scope and impacts

Water sampling and aerial photography by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science show that the algal blooms currently coloring...

02.09.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Oxygen oasis in Antarctic lake reflects Earth in the distant past

At the bottom of a frigid Antarctic lake, a thin layer of green slime is generating a little oasis of oxygen, a team including UC Davis researchers has found. It's the first modern replica discovered of conditions on Earth two and a half billion years ago, before oxygen became common in the atmosphere. The discovery is reported in a paper in the journal Geology.

The switch from a planet with very little available oxygen to one with an atmosphere much like today's was one of the major events in Earth's history, and it...

02.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA sees wind shear affecting Hurricane Ignacio

Hurricane Ignacio is staying far enough away from the Hawaiian Islands to not bring heavy rainfall or gusty winds, but is still causing rough surf. Infrared satellite data on September 1 shows that wind shear is adversely affecting the storm and weakening it.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathers infrared data that reveals temperatures. When NASA's Aqua...

02.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Penn and German researchers help identify neural basis of multitasking

What makes someone better at switching between different tasks? Looking for the mechanisms behind cognitive flexibility, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Germany's Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim and Charité University Medicine Berlin have used brain scans to shed new light on this question.

By studying networks of activity in the brain's frontal cortex, a region associated with control over thoughts and actions, the researchers have shown that the...

02.09.2015 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA-NOAA satellite shows fred facing a fizzling future

Fred was a hurricane on August 31 and weakened to a tropical storm on September 1 after moving through the Cape Verde Islands and the storm faces more obstacles in the coming days. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite on September 1 showed a less organized storm than on the previous day.

Fred continues to quickly weaken. The strongest thunderstorms near the center of the storm decreased in coverage and have become less organized in visible...

02.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Risk of financial crisis higher than previously estimated

The risk of a financial crisis is substantially higher than previously estimated, according to new research that accounts for multiple levels of interconnectedness in the financial system.

The study, published in the journal Financial Stability, introduces a new method that allows researchers to estimate the systemic risk that emerge from...

02.09.2015 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

An engineered surface unsticks sticky water droplets

The leaves of the lotus flower, and other natural surfaces that repel water and dirt, have been the model for many types of engineered liquid-repelling surfaces. As slippery as these surfaces are, however, tiny water droplets still stick to them. Now, Penn State researchers have developed nano/micro-textured, highly slippery surfaces able to outperform these naturally inspired coatings, particularly when the water is a vapor or tiny droplets.

Enhancing the mobility of liquid droplets on rough surfaces could improve condensation heat transfer for power-plant heat exchangers, create more efficient...

01.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New material science research may advance tech tools

Hard, complex materials with many components are used to fabricate some of today's most advanced technology tools. However, little is still known about how the properties of these materials change under specific temperatures, magnetic fields and pressures.

Researchers from LSU, Fudan University, the University of Florida and the Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures in Nanjing, China,...

01.09.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA sees Hurricane Jimena's large eye

NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellites provided views of Hurricane Jimena that showed it maintained a large eye and powerful thunderstorms around it. On August 31, Jimena continued moving through the Eastern Pacific as a major hurricane.

NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA's GOES-East satellites provided views of Hurricane Jimena that showed it maintained a large eye and powerful thunderstorms...

01.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

First global antineutrino emission map highlights Earth's energy budget

Tiny particles reveal information about Earth's geologic past and human-made radioactivity

The neutrino and its antimatter cousin, the antineutrino, are the tiniest subatomic particles known to science. These particles are byproducts of nuclear...

01.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Distant planet's interior chemistry may differ from our own

As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. New work from a team including three Carnegie scientists demonstrates that different magnesium compounds could be abundant inside other planets as compared to Earth. Their work is published by Scientific Reports.

As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be...

01.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

A new technique could pave the way for ultra low power and high-security wireless communication systems

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals...

01.09.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Seabird SOS

A new study inspired by a working group at NCEAS estimates that almost all seabirds have eaten plastic

Plastic debris in the ocean has been an environmental issue for almost half a century. Now, for the first time, scientists can predict the global impact of...

01.09.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Errant Galileo satellites will be used for research on Einstein’s general theory of relativity

When in August 2014 Professor Claus Laemmerzahl, Executive Director of Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) at the University of Bremen, learned that Galileo satellites 5 and 6 had not reached their designated orbits, he immediately had a vision of using them for his research on the general theory of relativity. Now the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has agreed funding for his “scientific recycling” project and granted him and his ZARM team access to the data collected by the Galileo satellites.

“Milena“ and ”Doresa“ were designed to orbit the Earth at a constant height of 23,000 kilometers to deliver precise navigation data for Galileo, the European...

01.09.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Older people getting smarter, but not fitter

Older populations are scoring better on cognitive tests than people of the same age did in the past —a trend that could be linked to higher education rates and increased use of technology in our daily lives, say IIASA population researchers.

People over age 50 are scoring increasingly better on tests of cognitive function, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE. At the same...

01.09.2015 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

Single-Crystal Phosphors Suitable for Ultra-Bright, High-Power White Light Sources

Researchers in Japan successfully developed single-crystal phosphors that use a blue LD (laser diode) as an excitation light source, are suitable for ultra-bright, high-power white lighting, and have outstanding temperature characteristics.

The Optical Single Crystals Group at National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) led by Group Leader Kiyoshi Shimamura and Senior Researcher E. Garcia...

31.08.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

Large agribusiness management strategies

19.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tiny Drops of Early Universe 'Perfect' Fluid

02.09.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

Learning from Nature: Genomic database standard alleviates search for novel antibiotics

02.09.2015 | Life Sciences

International research project gets high level of funding

02.09.2015 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>