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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 244,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 244,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.


Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

Targeted medicine deliveries and increased energy efficiency are just two of many ways

Nanoscience research involves molecules that are only 1/100th the size of cancer cells and that have the potential to profoundly improve the quality of our...

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

A rare triple-star system surrounded by a disk with a spiral structure has been discovered by a University of Oklahoma-led research team. Recent observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array -- a revolutionary observatory in northern Chile, commonly known as ALMA -- resulted in the discovery, lending support for evidence of disk fragmentation -- a process leading to the formation of young binary and multiple star systems. Until ALMA, no one had observed a tri-star system forming in a disk like the one discovered by the OU team.

John J. Tobin, professor of astrophysics in the Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, OU College of Arts and Sciences, led a global team of...

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

A new method provides a three-dimensional identikit of chromosomes

Genome sequencing is a milestone in modern biology as it allows access to the entire "list of instructions" (the chemical sequence of genetic makeup) for the...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gene therapy shows promise for treating Niemann-Pick disease type C1

NIH mouse study could lead to human clinical trials

For the first time, National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers have demonstrated in mice that gene therapy may be the best method for correcting the...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Solid progress in carbon capture

New heights reached for solids that capture carbon dioxide at low concentrations in gas mixtures.

Carbon dioxide capture is a high-profile area of chemical research offering a direct approach to tackling the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. This...

27.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

How the African clawed frog got an extra pair of genes: Whole genome sequence reveals evolutionary history of Xenopus laevis

The African clawed frog’s ancestor inherited one set of chromosomes each from two different species and doubled its whole genome some 18 million years ago, according to an international research team.

The African clawed frog’s ancestor inherited one set of chromosomes each from two different species and doubled its whole genome some 18 million years ago,...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How a fungus inhibits the immune system of plants

A newly discovered protein from a fungus is able to suppress the innate immune system of plants. This has been reported by research teams from Cologne and Würzburg in the journal "Nature Communications".

The fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes the roots of different plants. This can be orchids, tobacco, barley or even moss. It penetrates into the roots, but...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Mitochondria control stem cell fate

What happens in intestinal epithelial cells during a chronic illness? Basic research conducted at the Chair of Nutrition and Immunology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) addressed this question by generating a new model system. Functioning mitochondria play a decisive role in cellular homeostasis, but what happens when an important player of the anti-stress program in mitochondria is switched off? On the one hand, this leads to the loss of stem cells, but on the other, it sets healing processes in motion.

The human intestinal system covers an area of approximately 300 to 500 square meters due to its many protrusions (villi). This inner intestinal wall full of...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The gene of autumn colours

Researchers have found Mendel’s Stay-Green gene encodes an enzyme that extracts magnesium from chlorophyll, adding clarity to understanding how the pigment degrades.

In plants, the pigment chlorophyll plays a central role in photosynthesis: the process of converting sunlight to energy. This process involves creating a flow...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Polymer scaffolds build a better pill to swallow

Nanoparticle drugs can make it easier for medications to reach their targets.

The huge doses of drugs required to combat cancer could be reduced thanks to the work of Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR)...

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

One of the great challenges of electric mobility is effective and reliable storage of electrical energy in vehicles. Not just the discussions about manipulated exhaust values and regular fine dust warnings in cities like Stuttgart have shown that new solutions must be found for the mobility of the future.
Acting on behalf of the University, TLB is in charge of the commercial implementation of these future-orientated technologies on a global level and offers companies opportunities for cooperation and licensing.

In the past, great progress has been made in electric mobility. What's still missing is an efficient, small, stable electrical energy storage unit. Previously...

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

3-D-printed magnets

How can you produce a magnet with exactly the right magnetic field? TU Wien has a solution: For the first time, magnets can be made with a 3-D printer

Today, manufacturing strong magnets is no problem from a technical perspective. It is, however, difficult to produce a permanent magnet with a magnetic field...

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease

MRI data reveals structural asymmetries that vary among individuals, are greater among those who develop dementia

Use of a novel approach to analyzing brain structure that focuses on the shape rather than the size of particular features may allow identification of...

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

3-D-printed structures shrink when heated

Counterintuitive 'metamaterial' may enable heat-resistant circuit boards

Almost all solid materials, from rubber and glass to granite and steel, inevitably expand when heated. Only in very rare instances do certain materials buck...

26.10.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow

Roadside garbage fires a common but unhealthy practice in India

Samples of smoke particles emanating from burning roadside trash piles in India have shown that their chemical composition and toxicityare very bad for human...

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

First results of NSTX-U research operations

First results of NSTX-U research operations presented at the International Atomic Energy Agency Conference in Kyoto, Japan

Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratories (PPPL) and collaborating institutions presented results from...

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UCI and NASA document accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica

Study findings will help improve predictions about global sea level rise

Two new studies by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and NASA have found the fastest ongoing rates of glacier retreat ever observed in West...

26.10.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

Low-frequency vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf are likely causing ripples and undulations in the air above Antarctica, a new study finds. Using mathematical models of the ice shelf, the study’s authors show how vibrations in the ice match those seen in the atmosphere, and are likely causing these mysterious atmospheric waves.

Scientists at McMurdo Station detected unusual atmospheric waves with an altitude between 30 to 115 kilometers (20 to 70 miles) above Antarctica in 2011. The...

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

Colorado State University researchers have designed and built a fluorescence-detection microscope that combines 3-D and high-resolution image processing

Optical microscopy experts at Colorado State University are once again pushing the envelope of biological imaging.

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Did you know that infrared heating is an essential part of automotive manufacture?

Except for the coating, which dries more quickly using infrared heat, automotive manufacture uses infrared heating more or less invisibly. In the manufacture of airbags, for example, and in over 200 other fields of application.

Infrared makes production processes more efficient

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Enormous dome in central Andes driven by huge magma body beneath it

New study reveals how magma injected into the crust from below has contributed to the uplift of the spectacular Altiplano-Puna plateau in the central Andes

A new analysis of the topography of the central Andes shows the uplifting of the Earth's second highest continental plateau was driven in part by a huge zone...

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

First time-lapse footage of cell activity during limb regeneration

Researchers have for the first time recorded how cells of the epidermis behave during the regrowth of adult limbs after amputation.

Researchers have for the first time recorded how cells of the epidermis behave during the regrowth of adult limbs after amputation.

25.10.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Deep down fracking wells, microbial communities thrive

Snacking on fracking fluid sustains microbes, enlivens the chemical mix

Microbes have a remarkable ability to adapt to the extreme conditions in fracking wells, according to a study published in the October issue of Nature...

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

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