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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 230,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 230,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Shedding light on cold Higgs

For the first time physicists at the University of Stuttgart provide experimental proof of a stable and well-defined Higgs mode in superconductors – a direct analog to the Higgs particle, discovered only recently at the world´s largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN – however, using not more than a table-top experiment.

When François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize, a scientific breakthrough was honored that could hardly be more spectacular: born from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Researchers pinpoint 2 genes that trigger severest form of ovarian cancer

UNC geneticists create the first mouse model of ovarian clear cell carcinoma; show how a known drug can suppress tumor growth

In the battle against ovarian cancer, UNC School of Medicine researchers have created the first mouse model of the worst form of the disease and found a...

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Penn research shows relationship critical for how cells ingest matter

To survive and fulfill their biological functions, cells need to take in material from their environment. In this process, proteins within the cell pull inward on its membrane, forming a pit that eventually encapsulates the material in a bubble called a vesicle.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now revealed a relationship that governs this process, known as endocytosis.

Their new study, published...

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

MRIs link impaired brain activity to inability to regulate emotions in autism

UNC researchers find that the bigger the differences in brain activity related to emotion regulation, the more severe the autism

Tantrums, irritability, self-injury, depression, anxiety. These symptoms are associated with autism, but they're not considered core symptoms of the disorder....

27.01.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Satellite witnesses developing US nor'easter

National Weather Service forecasters have been tracking a low pressure area that moved from the Midwest into the Atlantic Ocean today, and is expected to become a strong nor'easter that will bring blizzard conditions to the northeastern U.S. The path of the system was captured in a NASA movie of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery.

An animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental or GOES satellite captured over the period of January 24...

27.01.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

NOAA's DSCOVR going to a 'far out' orbit

Many satellites that monitor the Earth orbit relatively close to the planet, while some satellites that monitor the sun orbit our star. DSCOVR will keep an eye on both, with a focus on the sun. To cover both the Earth and sun, it will have an unusual orbit in a place called L1.

The Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, spacecraft will orbit between Earth and the sun, observing and providing advanced warning of extreme emissions...

27.01.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Mainz researchers develop new theoretical framework for future studies of resilience

New approach focuses on the appraisal of stressful or threatening situations by the brain

Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as...

27.01.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

'Bulletproof' battery: Kevlar membrane for safer, thinner lithium rechargeables

New battery technology from the University of Michigan should be able to prevent the kind of fires that grounded Boeing 787 Dreamliners in 2013.

The innovation is an advanced barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery.

27.01.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Hydrogen conversion by the enzyme ‘Hydrogenase’

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion in Mülheim an der Ruhr report a novel ultra-high resolution crystal structure of the catalytically active state of [NiFe] hydrogenase in NATURE.

X-ray crystallography is still the method of choice to determine the atomic structure of large biological macromolecules. One of the major drawbacks of the...

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Keeping the Kraken asleep: inhibiting CDK6 prevents leukemic relapse

Despite enormous progress in cancer therapy, many patients still relapse because their treatment addresses the symptoms of the disease rather than the cause, the so-called stem cells. Work in the group of Veronika Sexl at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna has given a tantalizing clue to a solution. In the current issue of Blood, the scientists report that the cell-cycle kinase CDK6 is required for activation of the stem cells responsible for causing leukemia.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are normally inactive, i.e. quiescent. When new blood cells are needed, for example to replace blood that has been lost, HSCs...

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fruit flies use olfactory cues to detect healthy antioxidants in their food

Antioxidants are natural food ingredients that protect cells from harmful influences. Their main task is to neutralize so-called “free radicals” which are produced in the process of oxidation and which are responsible for cell degeneration. 

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, and the University of Lund, Sweden, now show that vinegar flies are able to...

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Solid or liquid - the particle size matters

Max Planck researchers elucidate how the phase state of aerosol nanoparticles depends on their size

Whether tiny particles in the air, so-called aerosol nanoparticles, are solid or liquid, is of great importance to atmospheric and climate scientists. The...

26.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Winters in Siberian permafrost regions have warmed since millennia

For the first time, researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have successfully employed a geochemical method used in glacier research to decode climate data from millennia-old permafrost ground ice and reconstruct the development of winter temperatures in Russia’s Lena River Delta. Their conclusions: Over the past 7,000 years, winter temperatures in the Siberian permafrost regions have gradually risen.

The researchers claim that this is due to the changing position of the Earth relative to the sun and is amplified by the rising greenhouse-gas emissions since...

26.01.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Researchers Introduce Macrosystems Approach to Study Stream Ecology

Kansas State University scientists and collaborators have developed a new method for studying a variety of streams — including tropical, prairie or forested...

26.01.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Making waves with lasers

Laser processing produces deep ripples in silicon over a wide area — something that could enhance solar cell efficiency

A*STAR scientists have produced a uniform nanoscale ripple pattern over a wide area on a silicon surface by scanning a femtosecond laser beam across it. Given...

26.01.2015 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

Learning to be precise

Mathematical model that learns to compensate for positioning errors can control a micromanipulation system more accurately

A mathematical model can improve the accuracy and repeatability of a positioning system by learning to anticipate tiny errors in its movements, show A*STAR...

26.01.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Rugged cellular router offers Broadband wireless connectivity

DistribuTECH 2015, Booth 1923

• Integrated LTE Modem with rollback to 2G and 3G networks for reliability
• Dual SIM card slot for service provider redundancy and automatic failover
• Rugged...

26.01.2015 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Improvements in Transistors Will Make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements should soon be expected in the manufacture of transistors that can be used, for example, to make flexible, paper-thin computer screens.

The scientists reviewed the latest developments in research on photoactive organic field-effect transistors; devices that incorporate organic semi-conductors,...

26.01.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

The seeing power of frogs

A quantum light source proves that light-sensitive cells in frog eyes can detect single photons

Miniature light detectors in frog eyes known as retinal rod cells are directly and unambiguously shown to detect single photons of light — an astounding...

26.01.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Hierarchically-Porous Polymers with Fast Absorption

Researchers at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has developed a method to form micropores of less than 2 nanometers within porous polymers.

Professor Myungeun Seo and his research team from the Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology at KAIST has developed a method to form micropores of less...

26.01.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Many antennas, multiple benefits

Deploying many low-power, compact antenna nodes to handle cellular traffic can make wireless communication more reliable and adaptable

A concept that balances large-scale installations of low-cost and low-power antennas to boost cellular coverage in difficult environments will also provide...

26.01.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Stardust on Ocean Floor Shows Gold and Uranium Alchemy in Stars is Much Less Frequent Than Expected

Researchers combing the ocean depths have made a surprising discovery about the frequency with which stars beyond our solar system produce special heavy elements such gold and uranium.

Stellar explosions such as supernovae or star collisions emit extremely bright light and vast amounts of energy and heavy matter. Half of the heavy elements in...

26.01.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

One Fish, Two Fish ─ Camera Counts Freshwater Fish, Which Could Help Combat Hydrilla

A camera can accurately count freshwater fish, even in the thickest of underwater vegetation, a key finding for those who manage fisheries and control the invasive plant hydrilla, new University of Florida research shows.

The finding by UF/IFAS scientists can help researchers understand how many and which fish species are using dense plant habitats, said former UF/IFAS graduate...

26.01.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Daily drinking increases risk of alcoholic cirrhosis

Results also suggest that recent alcohol consumption, and not lifetime alcohol consumption, is the strongest predictor, according to report in the Journal of Hepatology

Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year. Although alcohol is the most important risk factor, less is known...

26.01.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Researchers pinpoint 2 genes that trigger severest form of ovarian cancer

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences

Penn research shows relationship critical for how cells ingest matter

27.01.2015 | Life Sciences

MRIs link impaired brain activity to inability to regulate emotions in autism

27.01.2015 | Health and Medicine

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