Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 233,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 233,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: Fast and Accurate 3-D Imaging Technique to Track Optically-Trapped Particles

KAIST researchers published an article on the development of a novel technique to precisely track the 3-D positions of optically-trapped particles having complicated geometry in high speed in the April 2015 issue of Optica.

Daejeon, Republic of Korea, April 23, 2015--Optical tweezers have been used as an invaluable tool for exerting micro-scale force on microscopic particles and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Electrons Move Like Light in Three-Dimensional Solid

Tracking electronic motion in a graphene-like bulk material shows fast electrons in all dimensions.

The Science

24.04.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Connecting Three Atomic Layers Puts Semiconducting Science on Its Edge

New material with a layered, atomic sandwich structure has unique optoelectronic properties.

The Science

24.04.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Understanding the Body’s Response to Worms and Allergies

Research from The University of Manchester is bringing scientists a step closer to developing new therapies for controlling the body’s response to allergies and parasitic worm infections.

In a paper published in Nature Communications, Professor Andrew MacDonald and his team at the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research...

24.04.2015 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Metamaterials Shine Bright as New Terahertz Source

Discovery demonstrates how metamaterials may be used in non-invasive material imaging and sensing, and terahertz information technologies.

The Science

24.04.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Siemens integrates Sitop power supply into Simatic PCS 7 process control system

Siemens at the Achema 2015, Hall 11, Booth C3

  • Integration of the Sitop UPS1600 uninterruptible DC power supply increases transparency about operating states and plant availability
  • Sitop library for...
24.04.2015 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

A silver lining

UCSB researchers cradle silver nanoclusters inside synthetic DNA to create a programmed, tunable fluorescent array

The silver used by Beth Gwinn's research group at UC Santa Barbara has value far beyond its worth as a commodity, even though it's used in very small amounts.

24.04.2015 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Is a small artificially composed virus fragment the key to a Chikungunya vaccine?

The mosquito transmitted Chikungunya virus, which causes Chikungunya fever, is spreading continuously. No vaccine is so far available. Researchers of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have experimentally recombined segments of the virus surface protein E2, thus creating artificial proteins. The domain generated that way – "sAB+" – was able to confer a protective effect against Chikungunya virus to the animal. An immunization by means of this small protein fragment could thus provide a suitable approach to developing a Chikungunya vaccine. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases reports on the research results in its online edition of 23 April 2015 in the evening.

The Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and causes an infection in humans known as Chikungunya fever. CHIKV occurs in the tropical and...

24.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Why do animals fight members of other species?

Male aggression against potential rivals for females explains much of it, UCLA biologists report

Why do animals fight with members of other species? A nine-year study by UCLA biologists says the reason often has to do with "obtaining priority access to...

24.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Medical Technologies made in Germany: IVAM presents a joint booth at HOSPITALAR in São Paulo

From May 19-22, 2015 the international medical trade fair HOSPITALAR will take place in São Paulo. For the first time at HOSPITALAR, IVAM offers a joint booth, which is placed in the direct vicinity to a new, concentrated area for component manufacturers, which is comparable to the established medical device supplier fair COMPAMED in Dusseldorf.

The exhibitors of the IVAM Product Market at HOSPITALAR at the Expo Center Norte, Green Hall, booth H1 93, 95, 97 present materials and components for medical...

24.04.2015 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Network Filtering in Biobanks: Protective Protein against Huntington’s Disease Identified

While seeking targets to attack Huntington’s disease, an incurable inherited neurodegenerative disorder, neurobiologists of the research group of Professor Erich Wanker (Max Delbrück Center) found what they were looking for. Using a filtering strategy borrowed from criminologists, they systematically filtered interaction networks of various biological databases until they found the protein CRMP1. In subsequent lab experiments they showed that it acts like a “chaperone”, ensuring that the protein huntingtin (HTT) behaves correctly and does not misfold or clump. Dysregulated modulation of HTT by CRMP1 is regarded as a causal mechanism of Huntington’s disease (Genome Research)*.

Huntington's disease, historically referred to as St. Vitus' dance, was discovered in 1872 by the American physician George Huntington. It is a rare, incurable...

24.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Warming climate may release vast amounts of carbon from long-frozen Arctic soils

While climatologists are carefully watching carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, another group of scientists is exploring a massive storehouse of carbon that has the potential to significantly affect the climate change picture.

University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researcher Aron Stubbins is part of a team investigating how ancient carbon, locked away in Arctic...

24.04.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Earth Day: Disease spread among species is predictable

Study in California grassland expands understanding of biodiversity and management of emerging diseases

On Earth Day, a study of disease dynamics in a California grassland has revealed fundamental principles underlying the spread of pathogens, or disease-causing...

24.04.2015 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Giant Magnetic Effects Induced in Hybrid Materials

Magnetic property changes by several hundred percent over a narrow temperature range.

The Science

24.04.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Siemens Healthcare presents syngo.via RT Image Suite software solution

ESTRO Forum 2015, April 24 – 28 in Barcelona

  • Flexible multimodal image viewing for sound treatment decisions
  • Efficient contouring of tumor tissue and neighboring organs at risk
24.04.2015 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

New Path to Loss-Free Electricity

Atomic-scale details of electron distribution reveal a novel mechanism for current to flow without energy loss.

The Science

24.04.2015 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Stem-cell-based therapy promising for treatment of breast cancer metastases in the brain

New animal model of breast-to-brain cancer spread allows testing of therapeutic stem cell approach

Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have developed an imageable mouse model of brain-metastatic breast...

24.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NOAA, Tulane identify second possible specimen of 'pocket shark' ever found

Pocket sharks are among the world's rarest finds

A very small and rare species of shark is swimming its way through scientific literature. But don't worry, the chances of this inches-long vertebrate biting...

24.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Drexel materials scientists putting a new spin on computing memory

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data.

Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing: making a change often requires starting...

23.04.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

DNA of bacteria crucial to ecosystem defies explanation

Scientists have found something they can't quite explain in one of the most barren environments on Earth: a bacterium whose DNA sequence contains elements usually only found in a much higher organism.

Trichodesmium is a type of bacteria known as an oligotroph, meaning that it can survive in incredibly nutrient-poor regions of the ocean. In fact, it thrives...

23.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tau Ceti: The next Earth? Probably not

The list of potential life-supporting planets just got a little shorter

As the search continues for Earth-size planets orbiting at just the right distance from their star, a region termed the habitable zone, the number of...

23.04.2015 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UNH researchers discover new method to detect most common bacteria contaminating oysters

Vibrio outbreaks have sickened shellfish consumers in northeast

In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a...

23.04.2015 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

From metal to insulator and back again

New work from Carnegie's Russell Hemley and Ivan Naumov hones in on the physics underlying the recently discovered fact that some metals stop being metallic under pressure. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters.

Metals are compounds that are capable of conducting the flow of electrons that make up an electric current. Other materials, called insulators, are not capable...

23.04.2015 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

How experience may lead to misperception

Distance, volume, brightness or duration—when judging magnitudes, we make systematic errors. A new model of Munich researchers combines two competing classical theories of magnitude estimates and attributes prior experience to play an important role. The study has been published in the current edition of the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences.

How long is the way from the city hall to the train station? When we estimate distances, something curious happens: short distances seem longer, and long...

23.04.2015 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

HHL Energy Conference on May 11/12, 2015: Students Discuss about Decentralized Energy

23.04.2015 | Event News

“Developing our cities, preserving our planet”: Nobel Laureates gather for the first time in Asia

23.04.2015 | Event News

HHL's Entrepreneurship Conference on FinTech

13.04.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrons Move Like Light in Three-Dimensional Solid

24.04.2015 | Materials Sciences

Connecting Three Atomic Layers Puts Semiconducting Science on Its Edge

24.04.2015 | Materials Sciences

Understanding the Body’s Response to Worms and Allergies

24.04.2015 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>