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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 252,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 252,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

Growing evidence shows that sensory cells which enable us to taste sweetness, bitterness and savoriness (umami) are not limited to the tongue. These so-called Trpm5-expressing chemosensory cells[1] are also found in the respiratory system, digestive tract and other parts of the body.

Although their precise function in areas other than the mouth are not fully known, these sensory cells are thought to play an important "gatekeeper" role,...

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

The inside of an electron microscope, which requires vacuum levels similar to those encountered in outer space, can be an extremely inhospitable place for organic materials. Traditionally, life scientists have circumvented this problem by freezing their specimens so that that they can be safely loaded into a microscope. Now, researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have devised a new approach to imaging organic compounds.

By suspending organic samples in water vapor, OIST scientists were able to demonstrate another way to view them at high resolution. The researchers found they...

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

Autophagy allows cells to degrade and recycle their cellular components. Researchers at UZH have now demonstrated that the autophagy machinery in certain immune cells leads to the immune system attacking the central nervous system. The researchers are using these findings as a basis to look into new approaches to treating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

Autophagy refers to a fundamental recycling process of cells that occurs in yeast, fungi, plants, as well as animals and humans. This process allows cells to...

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Visualizing single molecules in whole cells with a new spin

A new imaging method could put super-resolution microscopy within reach of most biologists

Cell biologists traditionally use fluorescent dyes to label and visualize cells and the molecules within them under a microscope. With different...

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Closing in on advanced prostate cancer

RB Barcelona scientists propose a new approach to combat prostate tumor cells that have become unresponsive to the treatments currently available

In most cases, prostate cancer is cured by surgical removal of the tumour and/or by radiotherapy. However, 20% of patients will need treatment to remove tumour...

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bacterial control mechanism for adjusting to changing conditions: How do bacteria adapt?

A fundamental prerequisite for life on earth is the ability of living organisms to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have now determined that the regulation mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to different environments are based on a global control process that can be described in a single equation.

Environmental conditions like temperature, light, availability of nutrients and many other parameters are constantly changing on earth. Every organism and even...

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses

A gecko scampering up a wall or across a ceiling has long fascinated scientists and encouraged them to investigate how to harness lizard's mysterious ability to defy gravity.

While human-made devices inspired by gecko feet have emerged in recent years, enabling their wearers to slowly scale a glass wall, the possible applications of...

13.12.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Columbia engineers create artificial graphene in a nanofabricated semiconductor structure

Researchers are the first to observe the electronic structure of graphene in an engineered semiconductor; finding could lead to progress in advanced optoelectronics and data processing

Researchers at Columbia Engineering, experts at manipulating matter at the nanoscale, have made an important breakthrough in physics and materials science,...

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart

UCLA scientists show that high levels of glucose keep heart cells from maturing normally

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered how high glucose levels -- whether...

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New insights could lead to lasting improvement of stem cell therapy in horses

Stem cells have been used therapeutically in horses for many years as a treatment option for tendon and joint injuries. These cells are commonly obtained surgically from bone marrow or fat tissue. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna have now for the first time managed to harvest stem cells from the mucous membrane of the equine uterus. By taking stem cells from the uterus without the need for surgical intervention, the procedure provides an alternative with reduced pain and stress for the animals.

Mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent cells found in a number of tissues that can differentiate into various cell types. Stem cells thus provide an enormous...

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Multi-year submarine-canyon study challenges textbook theories about turbidity currents

Just as rivers move sediment across the land, turbidity currents are the dominant process carrying sediments and organic carbon from coastal areas into the deep sea. Turbidity currents can also destroy underwater cables, pipelines, and other human structures. Unlike rivers, however, turbidity currents are extremely difficult to study and measure.

At the Fall 2017 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, scientists from around the world will present 19 talks and posters about the Coordinated Canyon...

12.12.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Liver Cancer: Lipid Synthesis Promotes Tumor Formation

Lipid, also known as fat, is an optimal energy source and an important cell component. Much is required for the rapid and uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and from the University of Geneva have now discovered that the protein mTOR stimulates the production of lipids in liver tumors to satisfy the increased nutrient turnover and energy needs of cancer cells among other functions. This process has also been observed in patients with liver cancer as the scientists report in “Cancer Cell”.

In Switzerland, about 650 new cases of liver cancer are diagnosed every year. The incidence of the malignant and aggressive liver cell carcinoma has doubled in...

12.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Show me your leaves - Health check for urban trees

Trees are known to provide a whole range of benefits to people living in cities. For instance, they reduce air pollution, and provide cooling through respiration and shade. When trees become unhealthy, these benefits decline, and disease-ridden, unstable trees can even become dangerous to people. However, the traditional field inventories to check on trees are labour-intensive and expensive.
Today, researchers from KU Leuven will present a fast, cost-efficient and objective method to map, evaluate and monitor the health of urban trees at the ‘Ecology Across Borders’ conference in Ghent, Belgium.

The researchers combined images from two specialised sensors mounted in airplanes to evaluate the density and colour of leaves on individual trees in the city...

12.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

To differentiate or not to differentiate?

Stem cells sense neighbourhood crowding to make decisions on their behaviour

Human skin is a remarkable organ serving as a barrier protecting us from pathogens, toxic substances and others. Our skin needs to constantly renew throughout...

12.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Plankton swim against the current

Copepods swim together in a swarm even in turbulent currents. Researchers funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) have observed the behaviour of fish food with high-speed cameras.

Zooplankton are often considered to be a passive source of food for fish and other aquatic animals. But at least one of their representatives, the...

12.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Hot vibrating gases under the electron spotlight

Tokyo researchers study the dynamics of hot gas molecules by combining electron microscopy and simulation

Gases have been used throughout industry. Natural gas, for example, is "cracked" in refineries to make products like acetylene. The efficiency of gaseous...

12.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New silicon structure opens the gate to quantum computers

In a major step toward making a quantum computer using everyday materials, a team led by researchers at Princeton University has constructed a key piece of silicon hardware capable of controlling quantum behavior between two electrons with extremely high precision. The study was published Dec. 7 in the journal Science.

The team constructed a gate that controls interactions between the electrons in a way that allows them to act as the quantum bits of information, or qubits,...

12.12.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boars

Growing populations of wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) are causing more and more damage to agricultural land in Europe, requiring hundreds of thousands of Euros in compensation. A new drone-based method allows estimating crop damage in a fast, standardised and objective manner.

Anneleen Rutten, PhD student at the University of Antwerp and the Research Institute for Nature and Forest (INBO, Brussels) will present the method at the...

12.12.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

How fires are changing the tundra’s face

Climate change takes a heavy toll on the tundra, increasing the probability of extreme droughts. As a result, the frequency of fires in forests, bogs and even wetlands continues to rise. In addition, the northern areas of the tundra have also become more accessible and negatively impacted by human activities in recent years.

Two young ecologists from the University of Münster are studying the serious consequences fires can have for vegetation, soils and some endangered bird...

12.12.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Telescopes team up to study giant galaxy

Astronomers have used two Australian radio telescopes and several optical telescopes to study complex mechanisms that are fuelling jets of material blasting away from a black hole 55 million times more massive than the Sun.

In research published today, the international team of scientists used the telescopes to observe a nearby radio galaxy known as Centaurus A.

12.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Two holograms in one surface

Nanoscale silicon posts can reflect light differently depending on the angle of incoming light

A team at Caltech has figured out a way to encode more than one holographic image in a single surface without any loss of resolution. The engineering feat...

12.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Midwife and signpost for photons

Targeted creation and control of photons: This should succeed thanks to a new design for optical antennas developed by Würzburg scientists.

Atoms and molecules can be made to emit light particles (photons). However, without external intervention this process is inefficient and undirected.

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

A whole-body approach to understanding chemosensory cells

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

Water without windows: Capturing water vapor inside an electron microscope

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cellular Self-Digestion Process Triggers Autoimmune Disease

13.12.2017 | Life Sciences

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