Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 225,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 225,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate

A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm.

Researchers at the University of Southampton detected the rapid rise in sea-level by studying satellite scans of a region that spans more than a million square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

A smart fluorescent antenna for Wi-Fi applications

A new invention uses ionized gas in fluorescent light tubes to transmit Internet wireless frequency signals throughout a building with the aid of already existing electrical wiring.

Due to continuously evolving applications, the electronic communications industry requires high performance and speed efficient systems. However, the physical...

02.09.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Blowfly maggots provide physical evidence for forensic cases

Evidence collected from blowfly maggots could help in the investigation in murder cases.

Estimation of the post mortem interval (PMI) is one of the most crucial matters in autopsies and entomological specimens have been widely used to determine PMI...

02.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

Quantum control of molecules could lead to extremely fast computers

In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story.

02.09.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain

Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Although scientists know the basic neural circuits involved in sensing and responding...

02.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Experts defend operational earthquake forecasting, counter critiques

SRL publishes details of first official OEF system in Italy

Experts defend operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) in an editorial published in the Seismological Research Letters (SRL), arguing the importance of public...

02.09.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles

Nanoparticles, engineered materials about a billionth of a meter in size, are around us every day. Although they are tiny, they can benefit human health, as in some innovative early cancer treatments, but they can also interfere with it through viruses, air pollution, traffic emissions, cosmetics, sunscreen and electronics.

A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lan Yang, PhD, the Das Family Career Development Associate Professor in Electrical &...

02.09.2014 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Likely near-simultaneous earthquakes complicate seismic hazard planning for Italy

Before the shaking from one earthquake ends, shaking from another might begin, amplifying the effect of ground motion. Such sequences of closely timed, nearly overlapping, consecutive earthquakes account for devastating seismic events in Italy's history and should be taken into account when building new structures, according to research published in the September issue of the journal Seismological Research Letters (SRL).

"It's very important to consider this scenario of earthquakes, occurring possibly seconds apart, one immediately after another," said co-author Anna Tramelli,...

02.09.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds

The cause? Increased high-elevation plant growth fueled by climate warming

Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at...

02.09.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Nature's tiny engineers

Coral organisms use minuscule appendages to control their environment, stirring up water eddies to bring nutrients

Conventional wisdom has long held that corals — whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs — are passive organisms that rely entirely...

02.09.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Location of body fat can increase hypertension risk

Abdominal fat more strongly associated with high blood pressure risk than overall obesity

People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but fat...

02.09.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Faster, cheaper tests for sickle cell

Newly developed test can identify sickle cell disease in minutes and could be used in rural clinics around the globe

Within minutes after birth, every child in the U.S. undergoes a battery of tests designed to diagnose a host of conditions, including sickle cell disease....

02.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent

A new analytic framework enables analysis of GPS data on 150 million cab rides in New York City

Cellphone apps that find users car rides in real time are exploding in popularity: The car-service company Uber was recently valued at $18 billion, and even as...

02.09.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

NYU study compares consequences of teen alcohol and marijuana use

The study found that for high school seniors, alcohol consumption led to unsafe driving and compromised relationships with peers, while marijuana consumption was found to compromise relationships with authority figures

Growing public support for marijuana legalization in the U.S. has led to public debate about whether marijuana is "safer" than other substances, such as...

02.09.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

The key to drilling wells with staying power in the developing world

UNC study finds World Vision's model of local water committees, usage fees results in nearly 80 percent of wells remaining in use after 2 decades

What happens after a well is drilled, fitted with a hand pump, and a community celebrates having access to clean water for the first time? Half of them break...

02.09.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Endangered Siamese Crocs Released in Wild

Seventeen Rare Siamese Crocodiles Released in Lao PDR by WCS and Partners

Fewer than 1,000 critically endangered Siamese crocodiles remain in the wild

The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today the successful release of 17 juvenile critically endangered Siamese crocodiles into a protected wetland in...

01.09.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Doing More with Less: New Technique Uses Fraction of Measurements to Efficiently Find Quantum Wave Functions

The result of every possible measurement on a quantum system is coded in its wave function, which until recently could be found only by taking many different measurements of a system and estimating a wave function that best fit all those measurements.

Just two years ago, with the advent of a technique called direct measurement, scientists discovered they could reliably determine a system’s wave function by...

01.09.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Simpler Process to Grow Germanium Nanowires Could Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed what they call “a simple, one-step method” to grow nanowires of germanium from an aqueous solution. Their process could make it more feasible to use germanium in lithium-ion batteries.

The Missouri S&T researchers describe their method in a paper published Thursday (Aug. 28, 2014) on the website of the journal ACS Nano. The researchers’...

01.09.2014 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

From Termite Fumigant to Molecular Coupling

Sulfur fluoride exchange—a powerful new reaction for click chemistry

The coupling of molecular building blocks nearly as easy as “snapping” them together can be realized by means of the “click chemistry” tool kit. American...

01.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient.

Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. Ideally, the drug should have a shape that is perfectly complementary to a...

01.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A nucleotide change could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology.

Fragile X syndrome is caused by a defect in a gene on the X chromosome called fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1). Around 1 in 230 women and 1 in 360 men...

01.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tilapia fish: Ready for mating at the right time

Researchers identify a pheromone in the urine of male tilapia fish that stimulates spawning in females

The exchange of chemical signals between organisms is considered the oldest form of communication. Acting as messenger molecules, pheromones regulate social...

01.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn’t always work as...

01.09.2014 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists call for investigation of mysterious cloud-like collections in cells

About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do — even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the life of a cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment.

In the Journal of Cell Biology, two researchers are issuing a call to investigators from various backgrounds, from biophysics to cell biology, to focus their...

01.09.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

IT security in the digital society

27.08.2014 | Event News

Understanding the brain—neuroscientists meet in Göttingen

27.08.2014 | Event News

MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE: Bessere Behandlung dank Biomarker

21.08.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart fluorescent antenna for Wi-Fi applications

02.09.2014 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Blowfly maggots provide physical evidence for forensic cases

02.09.2014 | Life Sciences

Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

02.09.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>