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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 247,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 247,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

The ancient art of kirigami is inspiring a new class of materials

Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive.

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

Big changes from a small package for hydrogen storage

Sometimes, you have to go small to win big. That is the approach a multilab, interdisciplinary team took in using nanoparticles and a novel nanoconfinement...

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

New tool to map RNA-DNA interactions could help researchers translate gene sequences into functions

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new tool to identify interactions between RNA and DNA molecules. The tool, called MARGI...

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Let it glow

OIST researchers design new photoluminescent compounds

Chemical compounds that emit light are used in a variety of different materials, from glow-in-the-dark children's toys to LED lights to light-emitting sensors....

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sound-shaping super-material invented

A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists.

A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists.

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Heart examinations: Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents

The most prevalent method for obtaining images of clogged coronary vessels is coronary angiography. For some patients, however, the contrast agents used in this process can cause health problems. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now demonstrated that the required quantity of these substances can be significantly reduced if monoenergetic X-rays from a miniature particle accelerator are used.

The most prevalent method for obtaining images of clogged coronary vessels is coronary angiography. For some patients, however, the contrast agents used in...

27.02.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer IFAM expands its R&D work on Coatings for protection against corrosion and marine growth

Preventing corrosion and its consequences is a key issue in most industries because the cost of corrosion in Germany alone amounts to billions of euros. In addition, the marine growth on surfaces is a huge challenge for shipping, offshore wind turbines, and underwater steel structures.

Preventing corrosion and its consequences is a key issue in most industries because the cost of corrosion in Germany alone amounts to billions of euros. In...

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

Attacks by robber bees result in the evolution of larger guard bees and thus promote the division of labor in the hive

Although stingless bees do not have a sting to fend off enemies, they are nonetheless able to defend their hives against attacks. Only four years ago it was...

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding which are better tailored to the individual patients.

Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders. A research team aims to derive new therapies from this finding...

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

In the German capital 5G is not a distant hype. Already technologies for an intelligent network infrastructure are being developed and test environments are being installed, which can be used for testing new applications. At the Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona (Feb 27 – Mar 2, 2017) the Fraunhofer Institute FOKUS will present the test environment 5G Berlin at the booth of Berlin Partner (Hall 7, Stand L51).

In the German capital 5G is not a distant hype. Already technologies for an intelligent network infrastructure are being developed and test environments are...

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer HHI at Mobile World Congress with VR and 5G technologies

At the GSMA Mobile World Congress 2017 in Barcelona, Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute's wireless and video coding experts present their latest developments. Visit us at Fraunhofer Booth 7G31 in Hall 7 during February 27 and March 2.

At the GSMA Mobile World Congress 2017 in Barcelona, Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute's wireless and video coding experts present their latest developments....

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

NASA eyes Pineapple Express soaking California

NASA has estimated rainfall from the Pineapple Express over the coastal regions southwestern Oregon and northern California from the series of storms in February, 2017.

NASA has estimated rainfall from the Pineapple Express over the coastal regions southwestern Oregon and northern California from the series of storms in...

24.02.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp

Waterhemp has been locked in an arms race with farmers for decades. Nearly every time farmers attack the weed with a new herbicide, waterhemp becomes resistant to it, reducing or eliminating the efficacy of the chemical. Some waterhemp populations have evolved resistance to multiple herbicides, making them incredibly difficult to kill.

Adding to the challenge is the fact that waterhemp can evolve resistance in at least two ways. In target-site resistance, a gene mutation changes the protein...

24.02.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

New Mechanisms of Gene Inactivation may prevent Aging and Cancer

Every cell in our body contains the complete DNA library. So-called methyl groups regulate that in body tissues only the genetic information is expressed that is indeed needed in this tissue. Now, for the first time, researchers from the Leibniz Institute on Aging in Jena, Germany, verified that a lack of methyl groups in the gene body leads to an incorrect gene activation and, as a consequence, may lead to the emergence of cancer. The stunning results were published in the renowned Journal Nature on February 22, 2017.

Every cell in our body contains the complete DNA library. So-called methyl groups regulate that in body tissues only the genetic information is expressed that...

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun.

Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern...

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

The Earth's core consists mostly of a huge ball of liquid metal lying at 3000 km beneath its surface, surrounded by a mantle of hot rock. Notably, at such great depths, both the core and mantle are subject to extremely high pressures and temperatures. Furthermore, research indicates that the slow creeping flow of hot buoyant rocks--moving several centimeters per year--carries heat away from the core to the surface, resulting in a very gradual cooling of the core over geological time. However, the degree to which the Earth's core has cooled since its formation is an area of intense debate amongst Earth scientists.

The Earth's core consists mostly of a huge ball of liquid metal lying at 3000 km beneath its surface, surrounded by a mantle of hot rock. Notably, at such...

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

In a land where survival is precarious, Komodo dragons thrive despite being exposed to scads of bacteria that would kill less hardy creatures. Now in a study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that they have detected antimicrobial protein fragments in the lizard's blood that appear to help them resist deadly infections. The discovery could lead to the development of new drugs capable of combating bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics.

The world's largest lizard, Komodo dragons live on five small islands in Indonesia. The saliva of these creatures contains at least 57 species of bacteria,...

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential

Organic material self-assembles next to borophene with nearly perfect interface

23.02.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA spies Tropical Cyclone 08P's formation

NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone 08P as it was developing in the South Pacific Ocean. Tropical Cyclone 08P, or 08P formed east of Extra-tropical cyclone Bart.

NASA's Aqua satellite spotted Tropical Cyclone 08P as it was developing in the South Pacific Ocean. Tropical Cyclone 08P, or 08P formed east of Extra-tropical...

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties.

"We created the I-Wire Heart-on-a-Chip so that we can understand why cardiac cells behave the way they do by asking the cells questions, instead of just...

23.02.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Light-driven reaction converts carbon dioxide into fuel

Illuminated rhodium nanoparticles catalyze key chemistry

Duke University researchers have developed tiny nanoparticles that help convert carbon dioxide into methane using only ultraviolet light as an energy source.

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters

Rutgers' Nicole Fahrenfeld leads research documenting impacts in stream water and sediments from a wastewater disposal facility

Wastewater from oil and gas operations -- including fracking for shale gas -- at a West Virginia site altered microbes downstream, according to a Rutgers-led...

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria – an evolutionary advantage?

Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called bacteriophage. They carry so called auxiliary metabolic genes in their genome, which are responsible for producing certain proteins that give the virus an advantage. Researchers at the University of Kaiserslautern and the Ruhr University Bochum have analysed the structure of such a protein more closely. It appears to stimulate the photosynthesis of host bacteria. The study has now been published in the prestigious journal ‘The Journal of Biological Chemistry’.

Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called...

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

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