Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 253,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 253,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Basque researchers turn light upside down

Optical waves propagating away from a point source typically exhibit circular (convex) wavefronts. "Like waves on a water surface when a stone is dropped", explains Peining Li, EU Marie Sklodowska-Curie fellow at nanoGUNE and first author of the paper. The reason of this circular propagation is that the medium through which light travels is typically homogenous and isotropic i.e. uniform in all directions.

Scientists had already theoretically predicted that specifically structured surfaces can turn the wavefronts of light upside down when it propagates along...

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

Academy Professor Riitta Lahesmaa's research group from Turku Centre for Biotechnology of the University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Finland, has discovered a new regulator of the immune system, a key factor that controls development of regulatory T cells. The discovery provides basis for new strategies for the treatment of both cancer and immune-mediated diseases.

Regulatory T cells are critical controllers of the immune response. The majority of T cells boost the immune response enhancing the ability to destroy cancer...

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

A Keen Sense for Molecules

Laser physicists from the Laboratory of Attosecond Physics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis.

Infrared light has a keen sense for molecules. With the help of this light, researchers are able to go in search of the small particles which shape and...

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

“Laser Technology Live” at the AKL’18 International Laser Technology Congress in Aachen

From May 2 to 4, the laser community convenes for the 12th time at AKL’18 in Aachen. Laser manufacturers, laser users and laser novices alike will have the chance to see 77 presentations on innovative applications from industry as well as the latest scientific research. At the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, over 600 participants from Germany and abroad will also be able to experience “Laser Technology Live” in Europe’s largest laser park. Register now for AKL’18 at www.lasercongress.org and take advantage of the early booking discount until March 9, 2018!

At the “Laser Technology Live” event at the Fraunhofer ILT’s user center on May 3, 2018, visitors to AKL’18 will be able to discuss new technological...

23.02.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen

Chemists from the University of Würzburg have developed a boron-based molecule capable of binding nitrogen without assistance from a transition metal. This might be the first step towards the energy-saving production of fertilisers.

Whether wheat, millet or maize: They all need nitrogen to grow. Fertilisers therefore contain large amounts of nitrogenous compounds which are usually...

23.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stagnation in the South Pacific Explains Natural CO2 Fluctuations

A team led by geochemist Dr. Katharina Pahnke from Oldenburg has discovered important evidence that the rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at the end of the last ice age was triggered by changes in the Southern Ocean. The researchers were able to demonstrate that the deep South Pacific was strongly stratified during the last ice age, and could thus have facilitated long-term, deep-sea storage of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2). The study, which has now been published in the journal Science, also indicates that in the course of the warming following the end of the last ice age the mixing of the deep water masses increased, releasing stored CO2 and enhancing global warming.

The Southern Ocean plays an important role in climate events because CO2 can be absorbed from the atmosphere into the ocean. When increased amounts of dust are...

23.02.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Mat4Rail: EU Research Project on the Railway of the Future

Researchers from the University of Bremen and the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials Research (IFAM) are currently involved in the EU program Mat4Rail. Together with 16 partners from seven European countries, they are working on new developments in railway technology.

The number of passengers carried by rail has been steadily increasing since 2004. In addition to rising passenger demand, the railway sector will also face...

23.02.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Empa shows "Gas station of the future"

What could a "gas station of the future" look like? What services does it offer? Which fuels can be refueled there and where do they come from? Possible answers to these questions can be found at the stand of the of Swiss Oil Industry Association (Erdöl-Vereinigung) at the Geneva Motor Show. The stand in Hall 6 is run in cooperation with Empa and Hyundai.

In 2018, the Swiss Oil Industry Association (Erdöl-Vereinigung) will be making its first ever visit to the traditional motor show in 2018, where it will be...

23.02.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Researching the LED Wallpaper of the Future

Physicists from the University of Bremen have made a major breakthrough in understanding novel atomic thin materials that can be used, for example, to affix efficient flexible displays on curved surfaces. The results were recently published by the internationally renowned journal “Nature Communications”.

We live in a world of displays whose size and color-brilliance are constantly increasing. The further development of the light bulb is simple: It is...

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Combating sulphuric acid corrosion at wastewater plants: Graz scientists develop new solution

Writing in Water Research, Austrian researchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz discuss new materials that prevent damage from microbial induced concrete corrosion.

Wastewater systems are integral to infrastructure in every community. In an ideal world, they operate smoothly and are long-lasting. But biogenic...

23.02.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Atomic Design by Water

Scientists at the Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung show how geometric structures at surfaces can be formed with atomic precision by water

A central element in such diverse technological problems as corrosion protection, battery materials or hydrogen production via electrolysis or fuel cells is...

23.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stiffness matters

Nanomedicine entry into cancer cells can be tuned by modulating the stiffness of the plasma membrane

Nanomedicines need to get taken up by diseased cells in order to release their cargo. Cancer cells have altered membrane properties, which hamper their ability...

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Magnetic field traces gas and dust swirling around supermassive black hole

Astronomers reveal a new high resolution map of the magnetic field lines in gas and dust swirling around the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy, published in a new paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The team, led by Professor Pat Roche of the University of Oxford, created the map, which is the first of its kind, using the CanariCam infrared camera attached to the Gran Telescopio Canarias sited on the island of La Palma.

Black holes are objects with gravitational fields so strong that not even light can escape their grasp. The centre of almost every galaxy appears to host a...

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

The ocean around the Galápagos Islands has been warming since the 1970s, according to a new analysis of the natural temperature archives stored in coral reefs.

The finding surprised the University of Arizona-led research team, because the sparse instrumental records for sea surface temperature for that part of the...

22.02.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

'Memtransistor' brings world closer to brain-like computing

Combined memristor and transistor can process information and store memory with one device

Computer algorithms might be performing brain-like functions, such as facial recognition and language translation, but the computers themselves have yet to...

22.02.2018 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Snake-inspired robot uses kirigami to move

Bioinspired soft actuator crawls without rigid parts

Who needs legs? With their sleek bodies, snakes can slither up to 14 miles-per-hour, squeeze into tight space, scale trees and swim. How do they do it? It's...

22.02.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Separate brain systems cooperate during learning, study finds

A new study by Brown University researchers shows that two different brain systems work cooperatively as people learn.

The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, focused on the interplay of two very different modes of learning a new task:...

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

UMass Amherst physicists contribute to dark matter detector success

In the quest for evidence of dark matter, physicist Andrea Pocar of UMass Amherst and his students have played a role in designing and building a part of the argon-based DarkSide-50 detector in Italy.

In researchers' quest for evidence of dark matter, physicist Andrea Pocar of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and his students have played an important...

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Decoding the structure of the huntingtin protein

25 years ago, the cause of Huntington's disease was discovered. Mutations on a single gene, the huntingtin gene, lead to an incorrect form of the correspondent protein. With the help of cryo-electron microscopy, the recently awarded Nobel Prize winning method, researchers have now decoded the three-dimensional, molecular structure of the healthy human huntingtin protein. An improved understanding of the structure and the function of the huntingtin protein could contribute to the development of new treatment methods in the future. The work of the researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried and Ulm University has now been published in the journal Nature.

Huntington's disease often begins with emotional disturbances and is characterized by involuntary muscle movement and loss of mental ability. Until today, the...

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Camera technology in vehicles: Low-latency image data compression

The number of cameras in cars is increasing. However, through the flood of data the internal networks are being pushed to their limits. Special compression methods reduce the amount of video data, but exhibit a high degree of latency for coding. Fraunhofer researchers have adapted video compression in such a way that a latency is almost no longer perceivable. It is therefore of interest for use in road traffic or for autonomous driving. This technology will be on display at the Embedded World from 27 February until 1 March 2018 in Nuremberg in hall 4 (booth 4-470).

Up to 12 cameras are currently installed in new vehicle models, mostly in the headlights or taillights or the side mirrors. An on-board computer built into the...

22.02.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Minimising risks of transplants

A bone marrow transplant is often the only therapy available to save leukaemia patients, but the risk of complications is high. In spite of devoting considerable time and effort to finding a suitable donor, nearly half of all patients experience an unwanted reaction of their immune system, which often attacks their skin and liver and in up to 50% of cases the intestines. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in deciphering what causes this in some instances life-threatening inflammation of the intestines, possibly opening up new approaches for treatment.

The severe immune reaction is triggered by a special form of the donor’s immune cells. These so-called T-lymphocytes recognise that the recipient’s cells are...

22.02.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Maelstroms in the heart

Heart researchers in Göttingen, Germany, develop new, promising imaging technique for cardiac arrhythmias

Every five minutes in Germany alone, a person dies of sudden cardiac arrest or fibrillation, the most common cause of death worldwide. This is partly due to...

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>