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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 250,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 250,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

New thruster design increases efficiency for future spaceflight

Inlet nozzles create vortex to power plasma ejection

Hall thrusters (HTs) are used in earth-orbiting satellites, and also show promise to propel robotic spacecraft long distances, such as from Earth to Mars. The...

16.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Transporting spin: A graphene and boron nitride heterostructure creates large spin signals

Graphene Flagship scientists based at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, have created a device based on a blilayer of graphene and boron nitride which shows unprecedented spin transport efficiency at room temperature. Highlighting the potential of creating devices containing graphene and related materials, the spin signal measured here is so large that it can be used in real life applications such as spin based logic and transistors.

Published in Nature Communications this research, led by Professor Bart van Wees, University of Groningen, The Netherlands, reports a graphene-based device in...

16.08.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new method for the 3-D printing of living tissues

Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory- grown cells to form living structures.

The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of complex tissues and cartilage that would potentially support, repair or...

16.08.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Tracking a solar eruption through the solar system

Ten spacecraft, from ESA's Venus Express to NASA's Voyager-2, felt the effect of a solar eruption as it washed through the solar system while three other satellites watched, providing a unique perspective on this space weather event.

Scientists working on ESA's Mars Express were looking forward to investigating the effects of the close encounter of Comet Siding Spring on the Red Planet's...

16.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Value from wastewater

Sewage sludge contains lots of valuable elements which are prized as fertiliser for use in agriculture. Phosphorus in particular is an important nutrient for plants. Researchers at Landshut University of Applied Sciences are therefore looking at ways in which wastewater treatment facilities can use sewage sludge effectively, particularly in rural areas. They are doing this in conjunction with partners based in the Czech Republic.

The sludge that settles in sedimentation tanks is full of valuable substances like phosphorus, nitrogen or potassium. For this reason, it is often used in...

16.08.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

The irresistible fragrance of dying vinegar flies

Vinegar flies should normally try to avoid their sick conspecifics to prevent becoming infected themselves. Nevertheless, as researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and Cornell University recently found out, they are irresistibly attracted to the smell given off by sick flies. A dramatic increase in the production of the sex pheromones responsible for the attractive odor of the infected flies is caused by pathogens: this perfidious strategy is used by the deadly germs to enable them to infect healthy flies and spread even further (Nature Communications, August 16, 2017)

Markus Knaden and Bill Hansson, and their colleagues at the Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, study ecologically relevant odors in the natural...

16.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Cancer detection with sugar molecules

Scientists from the University of Würzburg have synthesized a complex sugar molecule which specifically binds to the tumor protein Galectin-1. This could help to recognize tumors at an early stage and to combat them in a targeted manner.

Galectins are a family of proteins that have become a promising source of cancer research in recent years. A representative thereof is galectin-1.

15.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Smarter robot vacuum cleaners for automated office cleaning

Intelligent IoT cleaning concept for smart offices

Can you really use Outlook to make sure your office floor gets vacuumed? Absolutely! Fraunhofer IAO is currently developing an intelligent cleaning concept for...

15.08.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

How protein islands form

Researchers at the University of Freiburg identify protein that inhibits the development of autoimmune diseases

The immune system protects humans from threats such as, for example, disease-causing bacteria, and cancer as well. Yet if the system malfunctions, it can...

15.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Researchers 3-D print first truly microfluidic 'lab on a chipl devices

Custom 3-D printer, custom resin used to achieve smaller scale

Researchers at BYU are the first to 3D-print a viable microfluidic device small enough to be effective at a scale much less than 100 micrometers. Microfluidic...

15.08.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Laser sensor LAH-G1 - optical distance sensors with measurement value display

The analogue laser sensor LAH-G1 is setting new standards in optical distance measurement.

Thanks to its sophisticated CMOS line sensor, the LAH-G1 series gives particularly precise measurements with a resolution of up to 0.5 µm. Moreover, the series...

15.08.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

New plate adds plot twist to ancient tectonic tale

Rice University scientists say Malpelo microplate helps resolve geological misfit under Pacific Ocean

A microplate discovered off the west coast of Ecuador adds another piece to Earth's tectonic puzzle, according to Rice University scientists.

15.08.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The critical point in breaking the glass problem

Famously described as 'the deepest problem in solid state physics' by Nobel Laureate, Philip Andersen, the glass transition, by which a liquid transforms into a solid without freezing, is shedding its mystique.

Until now, researchers' understanding has been splintered at best, with mutually incompatible interpretations of the physical processes underlying the...

15.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Studying the Sun's atmosphere with the total solar eclipse of 2017

A total solar eclipse happens somewhere on Earth about once every 18 months. But because Earth's surface is mostly ocean, most eclipses are visible over land for only a short time, if at all. The total solar eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017, is different - its path stretches over land for nearly 90 minutes, giving scientists an unprecedented opportunity to make scientific measurements from the ground.

When the Moon moves in front of the Sun on Aug. 21, it will completely obscure the Sun's bright face. This happens because of a celestial coincidence - though...

15.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UCLA scientists identify a new way to activate stem cells to make hair grow

UCLA researchers have discovered a new way to activate the stem cells in the hair follicle to make hair grow. The research, led by scientists Heather Christofk and William Lowry, may lead to new drugs that could promote hair growth for people with baldness or alopecia, which is hair loss associated with such factors as hormonal imbalance, stress, aging or chemotherapy treatment.

The research was published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

Hair follicle stem cells are long-lived cells in the hair follicle; they are present in the skin and produce hair throughout a person's lifetime.

15.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Engineers find better way to detect nanoparticles

It's long been thought that two's company and three's a crowd. But electrical and systems engineers at Washington University in St. Louis and their collaborators have shown that the addition of a third nanoscatterer, complementing two "tuning" nanoscatterers, to a photonics resonator makes for a fascinating physics party.

Specifically, the two tuning nanoscatterers set the resonator at an "exceptional point," a special state of a system at which unusual phenomena may occur. The...

14.08.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Massive particles test standard quantum theory

First explicit bounds from interference experiments with matter waves

Quantum mechanics describes how matter behaves on the smallest mass and length scales. However, the absence of quantum phenomena in our daily lives has...

14.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

NASA watches the Sun put a stop to its own eruption

On Sept. 30, 2014, multiple NASA observatories watched what appeared to be the beginnings of a solar eruption. A filament -- a serpentine structure consisting of dense solar material and often associated with solar eruptions -- rose from the surface, gaining energy and speed as it soared. But instead of erupting from the Sun, the filament collapsed, shredded to pieces by invisible magnetic forces.

Because scientists had so many instruments observing the event, they were able to track the entire event from beginning to end, and explain for the first time...

14.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New type of blood cells work as indicators of autoimmunity

Researchers have found a specific type of immune regulatory cells that could soon be used as potential clinical biomarkers to diagnose certain autoimmune diseases

The team from Instituto de Medicina Molecular Lisboa, led by Luis Graça, analyzed blood samples from Sjögren syndrome patients, an autoimmune disease that...

14.08.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Global warming will leave different fingerprints on global subtropical anticyclones

Subtropical anticyclone is an essential component of the atmospheric circulation in the subtropics, and it is responsible for the formation of subtropical monsoons and deserts. There are two subtropical anticyclones in the subtropical northern hemisphere in boreal summer, and three subtropical anticyclones in the subtropical southern hemisphere in austral summer. These five summertime subtropical anticyclones are all located at the lower troposphere over the subtropical oceans.

To assess the possible responses of the subtropical anticyclones to greenhouse gases (GHG) forcing, Dr. HE Chao from China Meteorological Administration, and...

14.08.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New SQUID-based detector opens up new fields of study with new level of sensitivity

A new sensor array using superconducting quantum interference demonstrates impressive sensitivity and bandwidth, offering new applications in nuclear material tracking, astronomy and more

Investigators at the University of Colorado, Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new sensor array-based...

14.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New malaria analysis method reveals disease severity in minutes

Left untreated, malaria can progress from being mild to severe -- and potentially fatal -- in 24 hours. So researchers at the University of British Columbia developed a method to quickly and sensitively assess the progression of the mosquito-borne infectious disease, which remains a leading killer in low-income countries.

One way malaria wreaks havoc on the body is by causing excessive amounts of toxic heme, the non-protein component of hemoglobin, to accumulate in the...

14.08.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Microbe may explain evolutionary origins of DNA folding

In the cells of palm trees, humans, and some single-celled microorganisms, DNA gets bent the same way. Now, by studying the 3-D structure of proteins bound to DNA in microbes called Archaea, University of Colorado Boulder and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers have turned up surprising similarities to DNA packing in more complicated organisms.

"If you look at the nitty gritty, it's identical," said Karolin Luger, a professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado Boulder and an...

11.08.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

New thruster design increases efficiency for future spaceflight

16.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Transporting spin: A graphene and boron nitride heterostructure creates large spin signals

16.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

A new method for the 3-D printing of living tissues

16.08.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

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