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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 253,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 253,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.


Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Wandering greenhouse gas

Climate models need to take into account the interaction between methane, the Arctic Ocean and ice

On the seafloor of the shallow coastal regions north of Siberia, microorganisms produce methane when they break down plant remains. If this greenhouse gas...

16.03.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region

Our health, safety, and well-being depend on how well we know the chemicals that surround us, and the development of new laser sources will now make it possible to identify chemicals with greater sensitivity

Chemical compounds all carry distinctive absorption "fingerprints" within the mid-infrared spectral region of 2 to 12 microns. This offers an opportunity to...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'

Precise methods of DNA 'packing' may affect gene expression

Scientists discovered another key to how DNA forms loops and wraps inside the cell nucleus -- a precise method of "packing" that may affect gene expression.

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer HHI have developed a novel single-polarization Kramers-Kronig receiver scheme

Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI developed a distributed superchannel aggregation scheme to demonstrate ultra-wideband single-photodiode reception based on inherently polarization-aligned Kramers-Kronig (KK) carrier generation at the receiver. For optimized conditions, a record net capacity of 400 Gb/s was achieved using a distributedly aggregated superchannel of 3×33 GBd 32QAM sub-carriers.

The need to establish and implement high capacity, simplified and cost-effective direct-detection (DD) schemes for short reach systems, such as data center...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

The view from inside supersonic combustion

Designing scramjets with extremely high-speed propulsion just got easier: Numerical simulations show the effects of shockwaves on fluid vortices and detail the complex wave forms and chemical reactions in shocked fuel.

In a jet engine, the flow of air is slowed down to increase the temperature and pressure for combustion -- burning fuel with the right ratio of fuel and air to...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Supercomputer simulation opens prospects for obtaining ultra-dense electron-positron plasmas

Long-term collaboration results of researchers from the Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod, the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Chalmers University of Technology

To achieve breakthrough research results in various fields of modern science, it is vital to develop successful interdisciplinary collaborations. Long-term...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UH scientists investigating mysterious dark matter

DarkSide-50 experiment reveals liquid argon is key technology

University of Houston scientists are helping to develop a technology that could hold the key to unraveling one of the great mysteries of science: what...

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists map the portal to the cell's nucleus

Like an island nation, the nucleus of a cell has a transportation problem. Evolution has enclosed it with a double membrane, the nuclear envelope, which protects DNA but also cuts it off from the rest of the cell. Nature's solution is a massive--by molecular standards--cylindrical configuration known as the nuclear pore complex, through which imports and exports travel, connecting the bulk of the cell with its headquarters.

In research described March 14 in Nature, scientists at Rockefeller University and their colleagues have delineated the architecture of the nuclear pore...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Compact fiber optic sensor offers sensitive analysis in narrow spaces

Compact sensor would be useful for biomedical, chemical and food safety applications

Researchers have developed a new flexible sensor with high sensitivity that is designed to perform variety of chemical and biological analyses in very small...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Monocrystalline silicon thin film for cost-cutting solar cells with 10-times faster growth rate fabricated

Controlling nano surface roughness of porous silicon

A research team from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Waseda University have successfully produced high-quality thin film monocrystalline silicon...

16.03.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Sleeping Beauty enables efficient gene transfer in haematopoietic stem cells of humans

Gene therapy of haematopoietic stem cells aims at a life-long therapeutically effective correction of these cells in humans with particular genetic disorders. This therapeutic approach has proved to be effective in clinical trials while the risk of leukaemia development as a side-effect of the therapy must be kept as low as possible. In an international research network, researchers of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have developed a method using "jumping genes" (transposons) to transfer genes efficiently and to anchor them in the genome of the modified cells. Molecular Therapy reports on the results.

In gene therapy of certain congenital disorders, the therapeutic gene is transferred into the target cells using particular transport vehicles, also known as...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Mice Change Their Appearance as a Result of Frequent Exposure to Humans

Many tame domesticated animals have a different appearance compared to their relatives in the wild, for example white patches in their fur or shorter snouts. UZH researchers have now for the first time shown that wild house mice develop the same visible changes – without selection, as a result of exposure to humans alone.

Dogs, cows, sheep, horses, pigs, and birds – over the past 15,000 years, our ancestors domesticated dozens of wild animals to keep them as farm animals or...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New Understanding of Parasite Biology Might Help Stop Malaria Transmission

Researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute made an important step toward deeper understanding of how malaria blood stage parasites turn the switch to become transmissible to other humans. This knowledge is fundamental for future research aiming to interrupt malaria transmission. The results will be published on Friday 16 March 2018 in the multidisciplinary journal Science.

Malaria parasites multiply asexually in the human bloodstream, thereby causing chronic infection and all the complications associated with this devastating...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A certain type of neurons is more energy efficient than previously assumed

Ion channels in interneurons are tuned for rapid and energy efficient signalling │Publication in Neuron

Theory and reality don’t always match completely. One contradiction, about how a type of neurons generates signals, was now resolved by researchers at the...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sentinels of the Genome

A comprehensive resource reveals dynamics of 70 DNA repair proteins - a powerful platform for basic research and anticancer drug evaluation.

Throughout life, DNA is constantly being damaged by environmental and intrinsic factors and must be promptly repaired to prevent mutations, genomic...

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Researchers demonstrate existence of new form of electronic matter

Researchers have produced a "human scale" demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These are the first experimental findings to validate this theory.

The researchers report their findings in the journal Nature.

The team's work with QTIs was born out of the decade-old understanding of the properties of a class of materials called topological insulators. "TIs are...

15.03.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Graphene flakes for future transistors

These nanostructures could open new prospects for the development of innovative devices thanks to quantum effects and unique magnetic properties

Tiny and very promising for possible applications in the field of nanoelectronics: they are the graphene nanoflakes studied by a SISSA's team and protagonists...

15.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scenario 2050: Lithium and cobalt might not suffice

With the increased significance of lithium-ion batteries, the pressure on the availabiltity of relevant ressources rises -- publication in Nature Reviews Materials

Lithium and cobalt are fundamental components of present lithium-ion batteries. Analysis by researchers at the Helmholtz Institute Ulm (HIU) of the Karlsruhe...

15.03.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Splicing together a thin film in motion

Technology reliant on thin film materials has become ubiquitous in our everyday life. Control of the electronic properties of materials at the nanometer level is reflected in advances of computers, solar energy and batteries. The electronic behavior of thin films is heavily influenced by the contact with their surroundings, as exemplified by the recent discovery of 2D superconductivity at a thin film interface. However, information about how such entwined states come into existence is limited by the lack of tools capable of visualizing such buried interfaces.

The recent work of Dr. Kenneth Beyerlein, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics (MPSD) in Hamburg, provides a new approach to...

15.03.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Boron can form a purely honeycomb, graphene-like 2-D structure

Seeking for low-dimensional boron allotropes has attracted considerable interest in the past decades and tremendous theoretical works predict the existence of monolayer boron. As boron has only three valence electrons, the electron deficiency makes a honeycomb lattice of boron energetically unstable. Instead, a triangular lattice with periodic holes was predicted to be more stable. In 2015, Prof. Wu has led a research team at Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and successfully synthesized 2D borophene sheet on silver surface, which is exhibiting the predicted triangular lattice with different arrangements of hexagonal holes.

An intriguing question is whether it is possible to prepare a borophene monolayer with a pure honeycomb lattice. Honeycomb borophene will naturally host Dirac...

15.03.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Research gets closer to producing revolutionary battery to power renewable energy industry

Any resident of the Great Plains can attest to the massive scale of wind farms that increasingly dot the countryside. In the Midwest and elsewhere, wind energy accounts for an ever-bigger slice of U.S. energy production: In the past decade, $143 billion was invested into new wind projects, according to the American Wind Energy Association.

However, the boom in wind energy faces a hurdle -- how to effectively and cheaply store energy generated by turbines when the wind is blowing, but energy...

15.03.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Helicobacter creates immune system blind spot

Around 50% of people are infected with the gastric bacterium H. pylori, which can lead to gastric cancer. It usually persists life-long, despite a strong inflammatory defence reaction in the gastric mucosa. Persistence in the midst of acute inflammation is a highly unusual feat for a pathogen and the mechanism has so far remained elusive. Now researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin have shown that by extracting cholesterol from host cell membranes H. pylori prevents assembly of interferon receptors. Without this signalling pathway, the adaptive immune system cannot be summoned to infected cells, generating a “micro-niche” where the bacteria can survive.

While gastritis and gastric ulcer disease used to be put down to stress and dietary factors, it was discovered in the 1980s that the actual culprit is...

15.03.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Laser-heated nanowires produce micro-scale nuclear fusion

Record-setting efficiency for generation of neutrons

Nuclear fusion, the process that powers our sun, happens when nuclear reactions between light elements produce heavier ones. It's also happening - at a smaller...

15.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more



Industry & Economy
Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

International Virtual Reality Conference “IEEE VR 2018” comes to Reutlingen, Germany

08.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Wandering greenhouse gas

16.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

'Frequency combs' ID chemicals within the mid-infrared spectral region

16.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Biologists unravel another mystery of what makes DNA go 'loopy'

16.03.2018 | Life Sciences

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