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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 246,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 246,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

Innovative biofibers made from a silk protein of the green lacewing are being developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP in conjunction with the company AMSilk GmbH. Researchers are working on producing the protein in large quantities by using biotechnology. The aim is to use the material in the future as a high-grade rigid fiber, for example, in lightweight plastics in transportation technology. It can also be conceivably used in medical technology, for example, as a biocompatible silk coating on implants. The Fraunhofer IAP is presenting its initial material sample at the International Green Week Berlin from January 20 to 29, 2017 in Hall 4.2, booth 212.

In order to protect their offspring from being eaten by predators near the ground, green lacewings deposit their eggs on the underside of leaves – on the ends...

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

At the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research was developed and tested a new method for a future treatment of cardiac arrhythmia. The research was carried by a team of biophysicists from GSI and physicians from Heidelberg University and the Mayo Clinic in the United States. Beams of carbon ions are already used successfully to treat tumors and could represent a non-invasive alternative to the present treatment with cardiac catheters or drugs.

Approximately 350,000 patients in Germany suffer from various forms of cardiac arrhythmia. The condition can lead to permanent damage as a result of stroke, or...

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bodyguards in the gut have a chemical weapon

Beneficial bacteria in the gut of moth larvae produce an antimicrobial agent that kills competing bacteria which otherwise have detrimental effects on insect development. An international team of scientists under the direction of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, were able to demonstrate for the first time that symbiotic Enterococcus mundtii bacteria secrete the antimicrobial peptide mundticin. It enters harmful germs in the gut of the African cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis and kills the unicellular organisms. The symbionts thus ensure a healthy gut flora and reduce the infection risk of the pest insect.

The African cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis, a major agricultural pest, is widespread, especially in the Mediterranean. It feeds on a broad range of host...

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

SF State astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet

SF State astronomer Stephen Kane searches for signs of life in one of the extrasolar systems closest to Earth

Is there anybody out there? The question of whether Earthlings are alone in the universe has puzzled everyone from biologists and physicists to philosophers...

20.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Treated carbon pulls radioactive elements from water

Researchers at Rice, Kazan universities develop unique sorbents, target Fukushima accident site

Researchers at Rice University and Kazan Federal University in Russia have found a way to extract radioactivity from water and said their discovery could help...

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

How much drought can a forest take?

Aerial tree mortality surveys show patterns of tree death during extreme drought

Why do some trees die in a drought and others don't? And how can we predict where trees are most likely to die in future droughts?

20.01.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Seeking structure with metagenome sequences

Metagenomics database helps fill in 10 percent of previously unknown protein structures

For proteins, appearance matters. These important molecules largely form a cell's structures and carry out its functions: proteins control growth and influence...

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor

Scientists have discovered how a unique bacterial enzyme can blunt the body's key weapons in its fight against infection.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Newcastle University in the U.K. are investigating how infectious microbes can survive...

20.01.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Snap, Digest, Respire

Scientists show how the Venus flytrap uses its prey’s nitrogen compounds to extract energy

The Venus flytrap captures insects for more than just nutritional purposes: A research team lead by Prof. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg and Lukas Fasbender from the...

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists initiate first ethical guidelines for organs cultivated in vitro

In the latest edition of the professional journal “Science”, Jürgen Knoblich, a leading authority on stem cells and deputy director of the IMBA (Institute for Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences), together with international experts, presents a first ethical guideline for research into human organ models. In the article, he also argues for critical and responsible engagement with the new technology.

Organ models, which are cultivated in the laboratory from human stem cells and grow into living tissue, are one of the most important scientific breakthroughs...

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland

A new research article, with lead authors from the University of Gothenburg, gives indications of the best places in Iceland to build thermal power stations.

In Iceland, heat is extracted for use in power plants directly from the ground in volcanic areas. Constructing a geothermal power station near a volcano can be...

19.01.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Not of Divided Mind

Tübingen neuroscientists discover that our brain is capable of mobilising additional resources for difficult tasks even in younger years.

As we get older, our brain mobilises additional capacity whenever it is particularly challenged. According to the current paradigm, the aging brain makes use...

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Molecule flash mob

Neurotransmitter transporters are some of the most popular transport proteins in research as they play a major role in the processing of signals in the brain. A joint study by TU Wien and the Medical University of Vienna has now successfully demonstrated for the first time the structural impact of membrane lipids on medically relevant serotonin transporters

The membrane of a cell is composed of a lipid bilayer. Lipids are good chemical and electrical insulators, which are ideally suited to separating the inside of...

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Rabies viruses reveal wiring in transparent brains

Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. A clearing procedure which turns the brain into a ‘glass-like state’ and light sheet fluorescence microscopy are used to visualize host-graft connections in a whole-brain preparation. The approach opens exciting prospects for predicting and optimizing the ability of neural transplants to functionally integrate into a host nervous system. The results have been published in “Nature Communications”.

Many diseases and injuries result in a loss of nerve cells. Scientists are working on tackling this challenge by transplanting neurons. In Parkinson’s disease,...

19.01.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Global threat to primates concerns us all

In cooperation with an international team of experts, scientists from the German Primate Center (DPZ) demand immediate measures to protect primates.

Worldwide, around 60 per cent of the 500 known primate species are threatened with extinction. Primates live in tropical and subtropical areas and are mainly...

19.01.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents

Teenagers are driven to seek new experiences: Adolescents are more likely to ignore information that could prompt them to rethink risky decisions. This may explain why information campaigns on risky behaviors such as drug abuse tend to have only limited success. These are the conclusions of a study conducted by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, which has been published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Reckless driving, binge drinking, drug taking—it is well known that adolescents are more likely than adults to engage in risky and impulsive behavior. A study...

19.01.2017 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Magnetic moment of a single antiproton determined with greatest precision ever

Physicists publish most accurate measurement of a fundamental property of the antiproton to date / Contribution to the matter-antimatter debate

As self-evident as it is that matter exists, its origins are just as mysterious. According to the principles of particle physics, when the universe was...

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

CRISPR meets single-cell sequencing in new screening method

A new cell screening method combines two revolutionary tools of biomedical research: Scientists at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have integrated CRISPR genome editing with single-cell RNA sequencing. Their study establishes a method for studying gene regulation in unprecedented scale and detail.

Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 “gene scissors” is a powerful tool for biological discovery and for identifying novel drug targets. In pooled CRISPR screens,...

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A big nano boost for solar cells

Solar cells convert light into electricity. While the sun is one source of light, the burning of natural resources like oil and natural gas can also be harnessed.

However, solar cells do not convert all light to power equally, which has inspired a joint industry-academia effort to develop a potentially game-changing...

18.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Glass's off-kilter harmonies

New modeling method focuses attention on amorphous material's unusual vibrational modes

Asegun Henry wants to avert the worst effects of climate change by finding new forms of renewable energy and improving the materials that contribute to energy...

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless "smart" patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The report on the device, which has been tested on mice, appears in the journal ACS Nano.

People with Type 1 diabetes don't make insulin -- a hormone that regulates blood glucose, or sugar. Those with Type 2 diabetes can't use insulin effectively....

18.01.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New dental implant with built-in reservoir reduces risk of infections

A multidisciplinary team of researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) has developed a dental implant that gradually releases drugs from a built-in reservoir. This helps prevent and fight infections.

Our mouth contains many micro-organisms, including bacterial and fungal pathogens. On traditional dental implants, these pathogens can quickly form a so-called...

18.01.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale

Chip scale high precision measurements of physical quantities such as temperature, pressure and refractive index have become common with nanophotonics and nanoplasmonics resonance cavities. As excellent transducers to convert small variations in the local refractive index into measurable spectral shifts, resonance cavities are being used extensively in a variety of disciplines ranging from bio-sensing and pressure gauges to atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Chip-scale microring and microdisk resonators (MRRs) are widely used for these purposes owing to their miniaturized size, relative ease of design and fabrication, high quality factor, and versatility in the optimization of their transfer function.

The principle of operation of such resonative sensors is based on monitoring the spectrum dependence of the resonator subject to minute variation in its...

18.01.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

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Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

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