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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 248,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 248,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

HZI researchers have identified a tool used by viruses to shut off the immune response

Bacteria and viruses continuously challenge the immune system. They reach the body by inhalation or via host contact with saliva, blood, or other secretions,...

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

Water is the Earth's most abundant natural resource, but it's also something of a mystery due to its unique solvation characteristics -- that is, how things dissolve in it.

"It's uniquely adapted to biology, and vice versa," said Poul Petersen, assistant professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell University. "It's...

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

Astronomers publish predictions of planetary phenomena on Jupiter that informed spacecraft's arrival

New observations about the extreme conditions of Jupiter's weather and magnetic fields by University of Leicester astronomers have contributed to the...

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Sediment from Himalayas may have made 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake more severe

Sediment that eroded from the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau over millions of years was transported thousands of kilometers by rivers and in the Indian Ocean -- and became sufficiently thick over time to generate temperatures warm enough to strengthen the sediment and increase the severity of the catastrophic 2004 Sumatra earthquake.

The magnitude 9.2 earthquake on Dec. 26, 2004, generated a massive tsunami that devastated coastal regions of the Indian Ocean. The earthquake and tsunami...

26.05.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Amazingly flexible: Learning to read in your thirties profoundly transforms the brain

Reading is such a modern cultural invention that there is no specific area in the brain dedicated to it. Scientists from the Max Planck Institutes in Nijmegen, Netherlands, and Leipzig, Germany, have found that learning to read as an adult reconfigures brain areas hitherto assigned to different skills. Most strikingly, evolutionarily ancient structures - located deep inside the brain - are more fundamentally changed than previously assumed. These findings were obtained in a large-scale study in which completely illiterate women in India learned how to read and write for six months.

Reading is such a new ability in human evolutionary history that the existence of a ‘reading area’ could not be specified in our genes. A kind of recycling...

26.05.2017 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

Dipping a tube into a container filled with water will make the water rise in the tube. This phenomenon is called liquid capillarity. It is responsible for many natural and technical processes, for example the water absorption of trees, ink rising in a fountain pen, and sponges absorbing dishwater. But what happens if the tube is dipped into a container filled not with water but with sand? The answer is - nothing. However, if the tube is shaken up and down, the sand will also begin to rise. Scientists have now discovered the mechanism behind this effect, the so-called granular capillary effect.

Dr Eric J. R. Parteli from the University of Cologne's Department of Geosciences, Professor Fengxian Fan from the University of Shanghai for Science and...

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

The 'quantized magneto-electric effect' has been demonstrated for the first time in topological insulators at TU Wien, which is set to open up new and highly accurate methods of measurement

A light wave sent through empty space always oscillates in the same direction. However, certain materials can be used to rotate the direction in which the...

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions

Research alliance between Fraunhofer MEVIS and Siemens Healthineers develops decision support systems for physicians based on deep machine learning.

With their joint research alliance, Siemens Healthineers and the Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS will support physicians in finding the...

24.05.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Devils Hole: Ancient Traces of Climate History

Geologists from the University of Innsbruck search for ancient traces of our climate history.

Diving in the cavern: Beneath the surface of the Amargosa desert, located in southwestern USA, lies a hidden ‘gem’ for climatologists that harbors a complete...

24.05.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation

Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have identified a key regulator gene for the formation of cardiac valves - a process crucial to normal embryonic heart development. These results are published in the journal Cell Reports today.

The heart is the first functional organ that develops in vertebrate embryos. In humans, it starts to beat four weeks into the pregnancy. Unfortunately,...

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A CLOUD of possibilities: Finding new therapies by combining drugs

The CeMM Library of Unique Drugs (CLOUD) is the first condensed set of FDA-approved drugs representing the entire target and chemical space of all clinical compounds. Its potential was shown in a combinatorial high throughput screen at the CeMM chemical screening platform, published in Nature Chemical Biology: by testing all CLOUD compounds in combination with each other, a pair of hitherto unrelated drugs proved to be highly effective against multiple prostate cancer cell lines known for their resistance to therapy. Testing CLOUD combinations in this highly automated procedure could pave the way for a new era of drug repurposing and provide novel strategies for personalized medicine.

Two drugs taken together can sometimes lead to outcomes that largely deviate from the effect of the separated compounds – a fact well known from warnings on...

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines

First, diesel vehicles tainted their reputation with soot particles, then high nitric oxide emissions. So are owners of new gasoline cars environmentally friendly? Not always, says a new study led by Empa scientists: some direct-injection gasoline engines emit just as many soot particles as unfiltered diesel cars did in the past. Particle filters can remedy this.

Worldwide, three new cars roll off the line every second – that’s 73 cars and 18 million utility vehicles per year. Most run on gasoline. In industrialized...

24.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object

There's something new to look for in the heavens, and it's called a "synestia," according to planetary scientists Simon Lock at Harvard University and Sarah Stewart at the University of California, Davis. A synestia, they propose, would be a huge, spinning, donut-shaped mass of hot, vaporized rock, formed as planet-sized objects smash into each other.

And at one point early in its history, the Earth itself was likely a synestia, said Stewart, who is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary...

23.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

Rice, Ben-Gurion universities show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling

Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling...

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

World's first demonstration of multicolor 3-D in vivo imaging using ultra-compact Compton camera with dramatically reduced measurement time

As represented by conventional radiograph, radiological images provide only black and white figures in 2D space. The situation is basically the same for Single...

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine

Researchers from UCLA, UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco map the genome of C. zofingiensis

Plant biologists and biochemists from UCLA, UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco have produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a green alga called Chromochloris zofingiensis...

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections

Microbial biofilms--dense, sticky mats of bacteria that are hard to treat and can lead to dangerous infections--often form in medical equipment, such as flexible plastic tubing used in catheters or in tubes used to help patients breathe. By some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in U.S. hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms. A study from The University of Texas at Austin suggests a possible new way to prevent such biofilms from forming, which would sharply reduce incidents of related hospital-borne infection.

Vernita Gordon, an assistant professor of physics and senior author of the paper appearing today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,...

23.05.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

A new tool for discovering nanoporous materials

Materials classified as "nanoporous" have structures (or "frameworks") with pores up to 100 nm in diameter. These include diverse materials used in different fields from gas separation, catalysis, and even medicine (e.g. activated charcoal). The performance of nanoporous materials depends on both their chemical composition and the shape of their pores, but the latter is very difficult to quantify. So far, chemists rely on visual inspection to see whether two materials have similar pores. EPFL scientists, in the framework of NCCR-MARVEL, have now developed an innovative mathematical method that allows a computer to quantify similarity of pore structures. The method makes it possible to search databases with hundreds of thousands of nanoporous materials to discover new materials with the right pore structure. The work is published in Nature Communications.

The search for nanoporous materials

23.05.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Two New Giants Discovered in Tiny Madagascar Rainforest

Two species of giant pill-millipedes, newly described from shrinking rainforest fragments in northern Madagascar show the importance of the sustainable use of isolated small forest patches in the tropics. The two new species were described with the help of micro-CT imaging and genetic barcoding. This is the first time these cutting-edge technologies helped in the description of millipedes from Madagascar.

Madagascar, a tropical island off the coast of east Africa, is home to many plants and animals found nowhere else in the world. The invertebrates found on...

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Did you know that packaging is becoming intelligent through flash systems?

Intelligent packaging can do more than just wrap a product. They help in the identification and logistics of the products, they protect against theft or product piracy. The core of the intelligent system are small chips, RFID labels or generally printed electronics. For this purpose, a metallic ink is printed and then made conductive by sintering. Sintering of low-cost copper inks works particularly well with flash lamps, since they sinter more rapidly than the copper could oxidize.

Heraeus Flash systems make it possible to sinter copper ink for smart packaging in milliseconds without damaging the paper

23.05.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

Geologists create model with potential to predict earthquakes, volcanoes, and other tectonic activity

Contrary to posters you may have seen hanging on the walls in science buildings and classrooms, Lijun Liu, professor of geology at Illinois, knows that Earth's...

23.05.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system

Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this "microRNA" promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies.

Stem cells give rise to the different cell types in adult tissues but, in order to maintain these tissues throughout adulthood, stem cells must retain their...

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

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