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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 224,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 224,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Im Focus: Biologists Reprogram Skin Cells to Mimic Rare Disease

Additional tool accelerates personalized medicine research

Johns Hopkins stem cell biologists have found a way to reprogram a patient’s skin cells into cells that mimic and display many biological features of a rare...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Yale's cool molecules

It's official. Yale physicists have chilled the world's coolest molecules.

The tiny titans in question are bits of strontium monofluoride, dropped to 2.5 thousandths of a degree above absolute zero through a laser cooling and...

22.08.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Fungus deadly to AIDS patients found to grow on trees

13-year-old's science fair project finds fungus in the environment

Researchers have pinpointed the environmental source of fungal infections that have been sickening HIV/AIDS patients in Southern California for decades. It...

22.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Novel recycling methods: The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

LMU researchers have developed a new process which will greatly simplify the process of sorting plastics in recycling plants. The method enables automated identification of polymers, facilitating rapid separation of plastics for re-use.

A team of researchers led by Professor Heinz Langhals of LMU’s Department of Chemistry has taken a significant step which promises to markedly expedite the...

22.08.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Shaping the Future of Nanocrystals

Berkeley Lab Researchers Obtain First Direct Observation of Facet Formation in Nanocubes

The first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes point the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design...

22.08.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors

New measurements of atomic-scale magnetic behavior in iron-based superconductors by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University are challenging conventional wisdom about superconductivity and magnetism.

The study published in Advanced Materials provides experimental evidence that local magnetic fluctuations can influence the performance of iron-based...

22.08.2014 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Enabling a new future for cloud computing

NSF awards $20 million to two new testbeds to support cloud computing applications and experiments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds--to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab"--that will enable the academic research community to develop and experiment with novel cloud architectures and pursue new, architecturally-enabled applications of cloud computing....

22.08.2014 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Electric Sparks May Alter Evolution of Lunar Soil

The moon appears to be a tranquil place, but modeling done by University of New Hampshire (UNH) and NASA scientists suggests that, over the eons, periodic storms of solar energetic particles may have significantly altered the properties of the soil in the moon's coldest craters through the process of sparking—a finding that could change our understanding of the evolution of planetary surfaces in the solar system.

The study, published August 8 in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Planets, proposes that high-energy particles from uncommon, large solar storms penetrate...

22.08.2014 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Despite a significant reduction in smog-producing toxins, the Greater Toronto Area still violates Canada's standards for ozone air pollution

Despite a significant reduction in smog-producing toxins in past decade, GTA still violates Canada's ozone standards

A new study shows that while the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) has significantly reduced some of the toxins that contribute to smog, the city continues to violate...

22.08.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

NASA Scientists Watching, Studying Arctic Changes This Summer

As we near the final month of summer in the Northern Hemisphere, NASA scientists are watching the annual seasonal melting of the Arctic sea ice cover. The floating, frozen cap that stretches across the Arctic Ocean shrinks throughout summer until beginning to regrow, typically around mid-September.

As of Aug. 19, Arctic sea ice covered about 2.31 million square miles. While this is on track to be larger than the record-breaking low year in 2012, the...

22.08.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The Internet Was Delivered to the Masses; Parallel Computing Is Not Far Behind

During the past few years, Virginia Tech’s Wu Feng has built upon a National Science Foundation (NSF) / Microsoft grant from the “Computing in the Cloud” program, and synergistically complemented it with subsequent collaborative grants, including a $6 million award from the Air Force on “big computing” for mini-drones and a $1 million award from NSF and the National Institutes of Health on “big data” for the life sciences.

As he wove together the “parallel computing” aspects from each grant, he was able to tell a much larger, more interconnected story –– one of delivering...

22.08.2014 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Canola genome sequence reveals evolutionary ‘love triangle’

An international team of scientists including researchers from the University of Georgia recently published the genome of Brassica napus-commonly known as canola-in the journal Science. Their discovery paves the way for improved versions of the plant, which is used widely in farming and industry.

Canola is grown across much of Canada and its native Europe, but the winter crop is increasingly cultivated in Georgia. Canola oil used for cooking is prized...

22.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Marine Protected Areas Might Not Be Enough to Help Overfished Reefs Recover

Young corals, fish turned off by smell of damaged habitats

Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.

22.08.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Study Verifies More Than 100,000 African Elephants Killed in Three Years

New research led by Colorado State University has revealed that an estimated 100,000 elephants in Africa were killed for their ivory between 2010 and 2012. The study shows these losses are driving population declines of the world's wild African elephants on the order of 2 percent to 3 percent a year.

This study provides the first verifiable estimation of the impacts of the ongoing ivory crisis on Africa’s elephant populations to date, solidifying...

22.08.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Some Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Affect More Than Their Targets

Discovery of changes to cell membranes has wide repercussions for drug developers

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes....

22.08.2014 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Wildland Fire Modeling Can Lead to Better Predictions

If we can better understand scientifically how wildland fires behave, we’ll have a better chance to accurately predict the spatial and temporal evolution of high intensity wildfires, says Dr. Shankar Mahalingam, dean of the UAH College of Engineering, and professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

Dr. Mahalingam is studying how wildland fire propagates in an effort to be able to more accurately model such fires via physically based computational models....

22.08.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Early Bottlenecks in Developing Biopharmaceutical Products Delay Commercialization

An analysis of patented university inventions licensed to biotechnology firms has revealed early bottlenecks on the path to commercialization. To open these roadblocks, the researchers suggest that better communication of basic research results during the discovery stage could lead to faster commercialization down the road.

Biopharmaceutical drugs are frequently derived from discoveries made in university laboratories and licensed to biotechnology firms. Bottlenecks are well known...

22.08.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Confirmed: 800 meters beneath Antarctic ice sheet, subglacial lake holds viable microbial ecosystems

Cutting-edge technology and science of the NSF-funded WISSARD project make discovery possible

B-roll from the WISSARD project is available by contacting Dena Headlee, dheadlee@nsf.gov / (703) 292-7739.

22.08.2014 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists uncover why major cow milk allergen is actually allergenic

Cow milk allergy occurs in children and in adults.

Scientists at Messerli Research Institute at the Vetmeduni Vienna, the Medical University of Vienna, and the University of Vienna investigated what actually...

22.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How Lizards Regenerate Their Tails: Researchers Discover Genetic ‘Recipe’

Finding may impact future therapies for spinal cord injuries

By understanding the secret of how lizards regenerate their tails, researchers may be able to develop ways to stimulate the regeneration of limbs in humans....

21.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

500 million year reset for the immune system

A single factor can reset the immune system of mice to a state likely similar to what it was 500 million years ago, when the first vertebrates emerged.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics (MPI-IE) in Freiburg re-activated expression of an ancient gene, which is not normally...

21.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Solar fuels as generated by nature

Thanks to new insights into the details of photosynthetic water splitting, the prospects for the development of clean fuels based on water and sunlight are improving

Society’s energy supply problems could be solved in the future using a model adopted from nature. During photosynthesis, plants, algae and some species of...

21.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Colds May Temporarily Increase Stroke Risk in Children

A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study is published in the August 20, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“While the study does show an increased risk, the overall risk of stroke among children is still extremely low,” said Lars Marquardt, MD, DPhil, of the...

21.08.2014 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Moving Single Cells Around -- Accurately and Cheaply

Scientists at the Houston Methodist Research Institute have figured out how to pick up and transfer single cells using a pipette -- a common laboratory tool that's been tweaked slightly. They describe this engineering feat and preliminary test results in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

"Studying single cells and their unique functions has become a frontier in current biomedical research," said nanomedicine department. faculty member Lidong...

21.08.2014 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Yale's cool molecules

22.08.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

Fungus deadly to AIDS patients found to grow on trees

22.08.2014 | Life Sciences

Novel recycling methods: The fluorescent fingerprint of plastics

22.08.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

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