Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 250,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 250,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: LaserTAB: More efficient and precise contacts thanks to human-robot collaboration

At the productronica trade fair in Munich this November, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be presenting Laser-Based Tape-Automated Bonding, LaserTAB for short. The experts from Aachen will be demonstrating how new battery cells and power electronics can be micro-welded more efficiently and precisely than ever before thanks to new optics and robot support.

Fraunhofer ILT from Aachen relies on a clever combination of robotics and a laser scanner with new optics as well as process monitoring, which it has developed...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Fraunhofer ISE Pushes World Record for Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells to 22.3 Percent

Research and industry worldwide are working to further reduce the costs of solar electricity and German research is playing a leading role. With its newest solar cell, the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE has now exceeded its own world record for multicrystalline solar cells. The record cell converts 22.3 percent of the incident sunlight into electricity.

Multicrystalline silicon, the work horse of the photovoltaic industry, dominates the PV module production worldwide with a market share of 57 percent. In the...

25.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance

Hearing loss, sometimes associated with other disorders such as balance defects, is the most common sensory deficit, affecting more than 280 million people worldwide, according to WHO. In France, one child in 700 is born with severe or profound hearing loss, and one in every 1,000 will lose their sense of hearing before adulthood.

Over the past 20 years, scientists have made remarkable progress in deciphering the genetic origins of congenital hereditary hearing loss, which is usually...

25.09.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

An international team of physicists a coherent amplification effect in laser excited dielectrics

An international team of physicists from the University of Kassel, led by Prof. Thomas Baumert, and the University of Aarhus, led by Prof. Peter Balling, discovered that ultra-short laser pulses are amplified in a laser excited piece of glass. This amplification, similar to a classical laser, is directed and of coherent nature. By utilizing theoretical models and simulations, the researchers were able to understand and reproduce the multi-step process leading to the “Laser Amplification in Excited Dielectrics” (short: LADIE) named effect. Their results were published online in the well-known research journal Nature Physics.

If a transparent dielectric material like water or glass is illuminated by visible or infrared light it is transmitted without loss. This quickly changes if...

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Highest-energy cosmic rays have extragalactic origin

Cosmic rays are atomic nuclei that travel through space at speeds close to that of light. Low-energy cosmic rays come from the Sun or from our own Galaxy, but the origin of the highest-energy particles has been the subject of debate ever since they were first discovered fifty years ago: do they come from our Galaxy or from distant extragalactic objects?

The question has now been settled by studying 30 000 cosmic-ray particles with energies a million times greater than those of the protons accelerated in the...

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Two Group A Streptococcus genes linked to 'flesh-eating' bacterial infections

Collaboration between the University of Maryland, College Park, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, finds two group A Streptococcus genes involved in invasive, spreading infection underneath skin.

Group A Streptococcus bacteria cause a variety of illnesses that range from mild nuisances like strep throat to life-threatening conditions including...

25.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA'S OSIRIS-REx spacecraft slingshots past Earth

NASA's asteroid sample return spacecraft successfully used Earth's gravity on Friday to slingshot itself on a path toward the asteroid Bennu, for a rendezvous next August.

At 12:52 p.m. EDT on Sept. 22, the OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security - Regolith Explorer) spacecraft came...

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

MRI contrast agent locates and distinguishes aggressive from slow-growing breast cancer

Case Western Reserve University researchers target tumor protein

A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent being tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University not only pinpoints breast cancers at early...

25.09.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity by tracing developmental origins

Dr. Nikolay Ninov, group leader at the DFG research center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, and Paul...

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

Varian Halcyon™ system streamlines training, shortens patient treatment time

Doctors at Penn Medicine have become the first in the world to treat a patient with a new treatment platform designed to streamline the way therapeutic...

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Calculating quietness

Noise bothers people and can cause illness. Researchers are working to dampen the sound directly at the source, for example through perforated walls in engines. Scientists around junior-group leader Dr. Kersten Schmidt from the Berlin research center MATHEON have now developed mathematical models helping to simulate and optimize sound emitters like this considerably faster and with a lower computational effort than before. The engine manufacturers in the region will also benefit from this.

Airplanes thundering a few dozen meters over the rooftops of residences, roaring ship engines that frighten sea creatures, driving cars that create a basic...

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Hope to discover sure signs of life on Mars? New research says look for the element vanadium

The search for biology on neighbor planet Mars won't play out like a Hollywood movie starring little green men. Rather, many scientists agree if there was life on the Red Planet, it probably will present itself as fossilized bacteria. To find it, astrobiologists likely will need to decode the chemical analysis of rock samples performed by a rover (like the one NASA plans to send to Mars in 2020). Only then might humankind know conclusively that life exists beyond Earth.

A new paper in the journal Astrobiology suggests NASA and others hunting for proof of Martian biology in the form of "microfossils" could use the element...

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Investigators may unlock mystery of how staph cells dodge the body's immune system

Patients can be infected again and again, but research could lead to first successful vaccine for superbug MRSA and other staph bacteria

For years, medical investigators have tried and failed to develop vaccines for a type of staph bacteria associated with the deadly superbug MRSA. But a new...

22.09.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Party discipline for jumping genes

Jumping genes, transposons, are a part of the genome of most organisms and aggregated into families according to their relatedness. Through jumping they change their place in the genome and can damage it. How the hosts of the transposons supress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. An important step is to understand which transposon properties and host environments facilitate jumping – this has now been investigated by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna for the first time in all transposons of the host organism. The study showed that family affiliation is much more important than their position in the genome. Molecular Ecology

The genome of a typical organism consists of many genes that are stringed like beads. This alignment has been surprisingly stable even over very long...

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped an international team of astronomers find that an unusual object in the asteroid belt is, in fact, two asteroids orbiting each other that have comet-like features. These include a bright halo of material, called a coma, and a long tail of dust. Hubble was used to image the asteroid, designated 300163 (2006 VW139), in September 2016 just before the asteroid made its closest approach to the Sun. Hubble's crisp images revealed that it was actually not one, but two asteroids of almost the same mass and size, orbiting each other at a distance of 60 miles.

Asteroid 300163 (2006 VW139) was discovered by Spacewatch in November 2006 and then the possible cometary activity was seen in November 2011 by Pan-STARRS....

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

CAU research team proves for the first time that host organisms can control the function of their bacterial symbionts.

In modern life sciences, a paradigm shift is becoming increasingly evident: life forms are no longer considered to be self-contained units, but instead...

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

Laser device placed on the heart identifies insufficient oxygenation better than other measures

A new device can assess in real time whether the body's tissues are receiving enough oxygen and, placed on the heart, can predict cardiac arrest in critically...

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

In times of climate change: What a lake’s colour can tell about its condition

With the help of satellite observations from 188 lakes worldwide, scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have shown that the warming of large lakes amplifies their colour. Lakes which are green due to their high phytoplankton content tend to become greener in warm years as phytoplankton content increases. Clear, blue lakes with little phytoplankton, on the other hand, tend to become even bluer in warm years caused by declines in phytoplankton. Thus, contrary to previous assumptions, the warming of lakes tends to amplify their richness or poverty of phytoplankton.

Lake specialist Dr. Benjamin Kraemer and his team used freely accessible NASA satellite images to test for associations between temperature and phytoplankton...

21.09.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

OLEDs applied to paper-thin stainless steel

Fraunhofer Institute FEP will be presenting OLEDs on gauzy stainless steel foil during aimcal 2017 in Tampa/ USA, from October 15 – 18, 2017. The novel application on display in Booth 22 was developed in cooperation with the Nippon Steel & Sumikin Materials Co., Ltd. (NSMAT) and Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation (NSSMC).

Stainless steel is normally associated with kitchenware and chemical Plant pipe. However, stainless steel foil has also been utilized for several years in...

21.09.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes

NIH-funded preclinical rodent study points to neutrophils for potential treatment options

While immune cells called neutrophils are known to act as infantry in the body's war on germs, a National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests they can...

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Discovery helps improve accuracy of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

Conformational changes within protein domains suggest mutations to make hyper-accurate Cas9s

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley and Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a key region within the Cas9 protein that governs how...

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stopping problem ice -- by cracking it

By manipulating substructures in a special silicone coating, researchers have reduced the ability of ice to stick to a surface to record lows

Scientists and engineers have been waging a quiet but determined battle against an unlikely problem: the build-up of ice on different structures.

21.09.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New biomaterial could replace plastic laminates, greatly reduce pollution

An inexpensive biomaterial that can be used to sustainably replace plastic barrier coatings in packaging and many other applications has been developed by Penn State researchers, who predict its adoption would greatly reduce pollution.

Completely compostable, the material -- a polysaccharide polyelectrolyte complex -- is comprised of nearly equal parts of treated cellulose pulp from wood or...

21.09.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fraunhofer ISE Pushes World Record for Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells to 22.3 Percent

25.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance

25.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

An international team of physicists a coherent amplification effect in laser excited dielectrics

25.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>