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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 249,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 249,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

While the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the "valley" property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed "valleytronics" - similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin). This property arises from the fact that the electrons in the crystal occupy different positions that are quantum mechanically distinct.

Now City College of New York physicists led by Vinod Menon have demonstrated how to manipulate the "valley" property using light by placing two-dimensional...

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

A toddler running sometimes loses footing because both feet come off the ground at the same time. Kinesin motors that move materials around in cells have the same problem, which limits how fast they can traverse a microtubule in the cell and carry cargo, according to Penn State researchers who have now seen these kinesin motors move using an unusual microscope and tagging method.

"We can now see biological processes at molecular resolution and at sub-millisecond time scales," said William O. Hancock, professor of biomedical...

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

The food chains recovered more rapidly than previously assumed after Earth’s most devastating mass extinction event about 252 million years ago as demonstrated by the fossilized skull of a large predatory fish called Birgeria americana discovered by paleontologists from the University of Zurich in the desert of Nevada.

The most catastrophic mass extinction on Earth took place about 252 million years ago – at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic geological periods. Up...

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materials

A new flexible material changes its porous nature when exposed to light

Researchers at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and the University of Tokyo have developed a light-responsive...

26.07.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Large, distant comets more common than previously thought

Comets that take more than 200 years to make one revolution around the sun are notoriously difficult to study. Because they spend most of their time far from our area of the solar system, many "long-period comets" will never approach the sun in a person's lifetime. In fact, those that travel inward from the Oort Cloud--a group of icy bodies beginning roughly 300 billion kilometers away from the sun--can have periods of thousands or even millions of years.

NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft has delivered new insights about these distant wanderers. A team of astronomers led by James...

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Type 15 avian paramyxovirus does not pose a threat to humans or birds; preliminary genetic analysis shows that it is closest to viruses found previously in South America

Researchers at the University of São Paulo's Biomedical Science Institute (ICB-USP) in Brazil have discovered a new virus in a migratory bird species. This is...

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland

Blood poisoning is one of the most frequent causes of death in small children. Many of these infections occur in the hospital. These are the results of the national sepsis study concluded by the Swiss Children’s Clinics.

The ten largest children’s hospitals in Switzerland researched the causes and effects of serious infections (so-called sepsis or commonly known as “blood...

26.07.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Biomarkers for identifying Tumor Aggressiveness

A Berlin study of patients with early-stage colon cancer / DNA repair mechanisms and MACC1 gene activity helps determine prognosis and predict response to chemotherapy

Early-stage colon cancer patients could benefit in the future from specific genetic tests that forecast their prognosis and help them make the right decision...

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

The space surrounding our planet is full of restless charged particles and roiling electric and magnetic fields, which create waves around Earth. One type of wave, plasmaspheric hiss, is particularly important for removing charged particles from the Van Allen radiation belts, a seething coil of particles encircling Earth, which can interfere with satellites and telecommunications. A new study published in Journal of Geophysical Research using data from NASA's Van Allen Probes spacecraft has discovered that hiss is more complex than previously understood.

The new study looked at a newly identified population of hiss waves at a lower frequency than usually studied. These low-frequency hiss waves are particularly...

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

Geoscientists have long puzzled over the mechanism that created the Tibetan Plateau, but a new study finds that the landform's history may be controlled primarily by the strength of the tectonic plates whose collision prompted its uplift. Given that the region is one of the most seismically active areas in the world, understanding the plateau's geologic history could give scientists insight to modern day earthquake activity.

The new findings are published in the journal Nature Communications.

Even from space, the Tibetan Plateau appears huge. The massive highland, formed by the convergence of two continental plates, India and Asia, dwarfs other...

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

Scientists from the University of Würzburg give fascinating 3D-insights into the bone marrow, and successfully elucidated new details about the process of thrombocyte generation. These important findings could contribute to optimized therapeutic approaches for patients with bleeding disorders.

Thrombocytes, also known as platelets, play an important role in wound healing and tissue repair at sites of vascular damage by facilitating blood coagulation....

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA flights gauge summer sea ice melt in the Arctic

Earlier this year Arctic sea ice sank to a record low wintertime extent for the third straight year. Now NASA is flying a set of instruments north of Greenland to observe the impact of the melt season on the Arctic's oldest and thickest sea ice.

Operation IceBridge, NASA's airborne survey of polar ice, launched a short campaign on July 17 from Thule Air Base, in northwest Greenland. Weather permitting,...

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fungi that evolved to eat wood offer new biomass conversion tool

UMass Amherst microbiologists, international team show fungal deconstruction of wood

Twenty years ago, microbiologist Barry Goodell, now a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and colleagues discovered a unique system that some...

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New map may lead to drug development for complex brain disorders, USC researcher says

A study of protein interactions could be the first step to finding treatments that focus on problematic pathways

Just as parents are not the root of all their children's problems, a single gene mutation can't be blamed for complex brain disorders like autism, according to...

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Dragonfly brains predict the path of their prey

New research from Australia and Sweden has shown how a dragonfly's brain anticipates the movement of its prey, enabling it to hunt successfully. This knowledge could lead to innovations in fields such as robot vision.

An article published today in the journal eLife by researchers at the University of Adelaide and Lund University has offered more insights into the complexity...

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy

Influenza virus prevented from adapting to chicken egg host

A new way of producing the seasonal flu vaccine could speed up the process and provide better protection against infection.

25.07.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

A new level of magnetic saturation

Scientists from Göttingen University detect strongest magnetic fields ever in low mass stars

An international group of astronomers lead by scientists from the University of Göttingen has detected unexpectedly strong magnetic fields on the surface of a...

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Multitasking monolayers

Two-dimensional materials that can multitask.

That is the result of a new process that naturally produces patterned monolayers that can act as a base for creating a wide variety of novel materials with...

25.07.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Physics of bubbles could explain language patterns

Language patterns could be predicted by simple laws of physics, a new study has found.

Dr James Burridge from the University of Portsmouth has published a theory using ideas from physics to predict where and how dialects occur.

25.07.2017 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Magnetic Quantum Objects in a "Nano Egg-Box"

Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called "fluxons", are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed and, at the same time, produce much less heat dissipation. Physicists around Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have now succeeded in producing a "quantum egg-box" with a novel and simple method. They realized a stable and regular arrangement of hundreds of thousands of fluxons. The results appear in the new journal "Physical Review Applied" of the renowned "American Physical Society".

Speeding up data processing in computers goes hand in hand with a greater heat generation, which limits the performance of fast computers. Researchers have...

25.07.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Molecular archaeology

Evolutionary biologists from Konstanz help solve puzzle of evolutionary relationships among vertebrates

Using the largest and most informative molecular phylogenetic dataset ever analysed, evolutionary biologists were able to construct a new phylogenetic tree of...

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

No gene is an island

Genes do not exist in isolation. Like beads on a string, they sit next to each other on long DNA molecules called chromosomes. So far, little has been known about how the position of a gene on a chromosome affects its evolution. A new study by Călin Guet, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), and Magdalena Steinrück, PhD student in Guet’s group, shows that a gene’s neighborhood can influence whether and how the activity of a gene changes. The study was published today in the open access journal eLife.

From bacteria to humans, the way organisms look and function depends a lot on how much product is made from each gene, in other words how active their genes...

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

25.07.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

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