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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 252,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 252,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

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Latest News:

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

In the race to build a computer that mimics the massive computational power of the human brain, researchers are increasingly turning to memristors, which can vary their electrical resistance based on the memory of past activity. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have now unveiled the long-mysterious inner workings of these semiconductor elements, which can act like the short-term memory of nerve cells.

Just as the ability of one nerve cell to signal another depends on how often the cells have communicated in the recent past, the resistance of a memristor...

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

Radioactivity in sediments at three disposal sites measured 650 times higher than normal.

More than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new...

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

In the analysis of the human genome, one question researchers have so far left unanswered is how to differentiate the variants of a gene inherited from the mother and father. Such information would increase the likelihood of treating certain diseases successfully. The so-called third generation of sequencing technologies is now making this possible. One of the most important tools for solving this complex puzzle is special software developed by scientists at the Center for Bioinformatics at Saarland University. The renowned journal “Nature Communications” has reported twice on their research.

Humans have 46 chromosomes. These carry the genes and define the genetic material, the so-called genome. So that the number of chromosomes does not double with...

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Research team creates new possibilities for medicine and materials sciences

Bacteria modifying the properties of cellulose

Cellulose produced by plants and bacteria is the most important material of biological origin on the planet. Acting as the main component in plant cell walls,...

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Multifunctional Platform for the Delivery of Gene Therapeutics

Thermo-triggered release of a genome-editing machinery by modified gold nanoparticles for tumor therapy

Gene editing is one of the hottest topics in cancer research. A Chinese research team has now developed a gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional vehicle to...

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The world's most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humans

Acoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids. For the first time University of Bristol engineers have shown it is possible to stably trap objects larger than the wavelength of sound in an acoustic tractor beam. This discovery opens the door to the manipulation of drug capsules or micro-surgical implements within the body. Container-less transportation of delicate larger samples is now also a possibility and could lead to levitating humans.

Researchers previously thought that acoustic tractor beams were fundamentally limited to levitating small objects as all the previous attempts to trap...

22.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Siberian scientists learned how to reduce harmful emissions from HPPs

A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and their colleagues from Novosibirsk and the Netherlands modeled the process of coal burning in HPP boilers and found out which type of fuel produced less harmful emissions. The study was published in Fuel journal.

Heat power plants (HPPs) supply electrical energy to many cities in the world. The production of heat and electricity starts with burning coal in a combustion...

22.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Combination of Resistance Genes Offers Better Protection for Wheat against Powdery Mildew

UZH plant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease.

A decent wheat harvest requires robust wheat. However, wheat crops are often infected by fungal diseases such as powdery mildew. For several years now, UZH...

22.01.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Two dimensional circuit with magnetic quasi-particles

Whether smart phone, computer or dialysis machine – there is no electronic device without chips and their electronic components inside. The individual circuit elements are therefore often wired using three dimensional so called bridge constructions. Currently, physicists at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern are working on a more efficient variation, where specific quasiparticles named magnons instead of electrons are being used. They have shown for the first time, in an initial model, that magnon current flow is possible in an integrated magnon circuit, in which case the components are only being connected two dimensionally. These investigations have been published in ‘Science Advances’

A technical revolution came when the US engineer Jack Kilby developed the integrated circuit in the 1960s. Initially assembled in a pocket calculator, this...

22.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Electrical fields drive nano-machines a 100,000 times faster than previous methods

Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in the renowned scientific journal Science.

Up and down, up and down. The points of light alternate back and forth in lockstep. They are produced by glowing molecules affixed to the ends of tiny robot...

22.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Charge Order and Electron Localization in a Molecule-Based Solid

Charge ordering in cationic mixed-valence compounds is of crucial importance for materials science. The prototypic example for a transition from a charge-disordered to a charge-ordered state has been magnetite, Fe3O4, where Evert Verwey observed a sudden jump in resistivity near -150°C. In the journal Science Advances now a research team of scientists from Germany and Slovenia reports a Verwey-type charge-ordering transition in a different class of mixed-valence compounds that is composed of negatively charged dioxygen molecules.

Charge ordering in mixed-valence compounds, which usually contain positively charged cations in more than one formal charge state, is of crucial importance for...

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Let the good tubes roll

Inspired by biology, a PNNL-led team of scientists has created new tiny tubes that could help with water purification and tissue engineering studies

Materials scientists, led by a team at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, designed a tiny tube that rolls up and zips closed.

19.01.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

Cancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers.

How metastasis occurs has been one of the central mysteries of cancer biology. The findings, published Jan. 17 in Nature, appear to have partly solved this...

19.01.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formation

Dust is everywhere -- not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space

Dust is everywhere--not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space. To astronomers, dust can be a nuisance by blocking the light of distant...

19.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures

Technique could lead to new classes of materials that can bend light, such as for those used in cloaking devices

Northwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could...

19.01.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

More genes are active in high-performance maize

When two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that the offspring had many more active genes than the original parents. These results may help in the cultivation of even higher-yielding maize varieties.

Plant breeders have long known that crossbreeding of different inbred lines has a positive effect on the yield. However, the causes of this so-called...

19.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How plants see light

The proteins PCH1 and PCHL help plants adapt to their surroundings

Plants react sensitively to changes in their surroundings and possess the ability to adapt to them. They use the photoreceptor protein phytochrome B to see...

19.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Polymers Based on Boron?

The construction of a polymer from a chain of boron atoms is currently more science fiction than science – this is the dream of Würzburg Chemistry Professor Holger Braunschweig, who has just received a 1.5 million Euro grant to make boron polymers a reality.

Plastic bags from polyethylene, packaging from polystyrene, frying pans with Teflon coatings: everyday life is awash with polymers. Chemically, polymers are...

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

Columbia biomedical engineers design a new, biomaterials-based system that takes a soft approach to improving cell manufacturing and may bring new hope to cancer patients for T-cell therapy

T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer,...

18.01.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

World’s oldest known oxygen oasis discovered

Tübingen University geoscientists find traces of early oxygen-producing bacteria in 3 billion year old sediments in South Africa’s Pongola Basin

In the Earth’s early history, several billion years ago, only traces of oxygen existed in the atmosphere and the oceans. Today’s air-breathing organisms could...

18.01.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Uncovering decades of questionable investments

Careful computational analysis of 40 years of stock prices explains important anomaly

One of the key principles in asset pricing -- how we value everything from stocks and bonds to real estate -- is that investments with high risk should, on...

18.01.2018 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accurately

A University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue --something that conventional methods cannot do. The team's gene expression technique is described in a paper published in the online edition of Nature Communications.

According to Illinois Bioengineering Professor Rashid Bashir, existing gene expression methods have limitations. "They are cumbersome and slow, taking hours or...

18.01.2018 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Scientists on the road to discovering impact of urban road dust

Sunlight creates chemical reactions, researchers discover. Next step is to find out what they are and how they affect us.

In an attempt to better understand the urban environment and its components, scientists have discovered that sunlight causes chemical reactions in the dust...

18.01.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

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Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

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Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

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Latest News

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences

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