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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 249,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 249,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

Versatile optomechanical beams have potential applications in biology, chemistry, electronics

In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes...

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

At EPFL, researchers challenge a fundamental law and discover that more electromagnetic energy can be stored in wave-guiding systems than previously thought. The discovery has implications in telecommunications. Working around the fundamental law, they conceived resonant and wave-guiding systems capable of storing energy over a prolonged period while keeping a broad bandwidth. Their trick was to create asymmetric resonant or wave-guiding systems using magnetic fields.

At EPFL, researchers challenge a fundamental law and discover that more electromagnetic energy can be stored in wave-guiding systems than previously thought....

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Equipping form with function

Thanks to software developed at IST Austria, even novice users will be able to easily adjust a 3D-printable mechanism to fit a new shape. The Algorithm will be presented at the prestigious “SIGGRAPH” conference this summer.

Common toys such as steerable cars or waving wind-up figures are available as 3D-printable models, which also contain their mechanical components. However,...

23.06.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronics

In a proof-of-concept study, North Carolina State University engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.

Wearable devices used to monitor a variety of health and environmental measures are becoming increasingly popular. The performance and efficiency of flexible...

23.06.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Individualized fiber components for the world market

On June 14th, 2017, Dr.-Ing. Thomas Theeg, scientist at the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH), founded the 18th spin-off company of the research institute. Specialized in custom glass fiber components, fiber modules and manufacturing systems for these components, the FiberBridge Photonics GmbH will be providing customers from research, production, telecommunications and medical technology with individualized products.

Already in March 2016, the business idea had been awarded at the StartUp-Impuls ideas competition of the Sparkasse Hannover and the hannoverimpuls GmbH in the...

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How brains surrender to sleep

Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna study fundamental aspects of sleep in roundworms. Using advanced technologies, they monitor the activity of all nerve cells in the brain while they are falling asleep and waking up. The journal Science publishes their ground-breaking results this week.

Sleep is a universal trait in animals: every nervous system seems to regularly undergo and require states of relaxation, during which brain activity is...

23.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Understanding animal social networks can aid wildlife conservation

As with humans, most animals prefer to associate with some individuals and not with others. The social structure can influence how a population responds to changes in its environment. Examining social networks is a promising technique for understanding, predicting and – if for the better – manipulating this structure. However, whereas the contribution of behavioural biology to conservation is already well recognized, the usefulness of animal social network analysis as a conservation tool has not yet been addressed.

A group of behavioural ecologists led by Lysanne Snijders from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) outlines how the...

23.06.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation

The study helps in understanding the mechanisms underlying memory formation

A team, led by researchers from the Cajal Institute (Madrid) belonging to the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have discovered some basic processes...

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors.

Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano...

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

The design of new catalysts is essential for making new and useful organosilicon compounds(term2), which are in high demand in fields ranging from the medical to the electronics industries. A crucial step in this process is hydrosilylation (the formation of carbon-silicon bonds), and much interest has focused on rhodium-based catalysts known to be effective in accelerating this reaction.

Now, Ken Motokura of Tokyo Institute of technology (Tokyo Tech) and colleagues have devised a new catalyst consisting of three core components -- a rhodium...

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New 3-D display takes the eye fatigue out of virtual reality

Innovative technology mimics the depth cues our eyes are accustomed to in the real-world

There is a great deal of excitement around virtual reality (VR) headsets that display a computer-simulated world and augmented reality (AR) glasses that...

22.06.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

New technique makes brain scans better

Boosting quality of patient MRIs could enable large-scale studies of stroke outcome.

People who suffer a stroke often undergo a brain scan at the hospital, allowing doctors to determine the location and extent of the damage. Researchers who...

22.06.2017 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

CWRU researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storage

Chemists at Case Western Reserve University have found a way to possibly store digital data in half the space current systems require.

From supercomputers to smartphones, the amount of data people generate and collect continues to grow exponentially, and the need to store all that information...

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles

A new Swansea University study has suggested that warming temperatures could drive sea turtles to extinction.

The study by Dr Jacques-Olivier Laloë of the University's College of Science and published in the Global Change Biology journal, argues that warmer...

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Innovative LED High Power Light Source for UV

The successful „LedHUB“ LED light engine produced by Laser- and LED specialist Omicron is now available down to 340nm

Omicron‘s innovative „LedHUB LED Light Engine“ represents a new form of LED light source for science and research. The high-performance system can be equipped...

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic risk

A proposed tax on systemically risky financial transactions could reduce the risk of financial system crashes by spurring financial networks to reshape in more resilient ways.

A tax on systemically risky transactions could reshape financial networks into a new structure that is less vulnerable to cascading financial system shocks...

22.06.2017 | Business and Finance | nachricht Read more

Spin liquids − back to the roots

Researchers from Augsburg, Oxford, and Nanjing report in Nature Communications on a neutron experiment exposing experimental signatures of a low-temperature state predicted 44 years ago

Since 1973, Anderson's resonating valence bond model remains a paradigm for microscopic description of quantum spin liquids in frustrated magnets. It is of...

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Hubble captures massive dead disk galaxy that challenges theories of galaxy evolution

By combining the power of a "natural lens" in space with the capability of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers made a surprising discovery--the first example of a compact yet massive, fast-spinning, disk-shaped galaxy that stopped making stars only a few billion years after the big bang.

Finding such a galaxy early in the history of the universe challenges the current understanding of how massive galaxies form and evolve, say researchers.

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New femto-camera with quadrillion fractions of a second resolution

Researchers from ITMO University have built a setup for recording holograms of tiny objects like living cells with a femtosecond speed. The new method allows one to reconstruct phase topography of a studied sample according to deformations that emerge in a laser pulse when it passes through the specimen. In comparison to electron microscopes, the device can visualize transparent biological structures without introducing contrast agents. The paper was published in Applied Physics Letters.

Vital activity of living cells is a complex sequence of biochemical reactions and physical processes; many of them take place with high temporal resolution. To...

22.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Rice U. chemists create 3-D printed graphene foam

Nanotechnologists from Rice University and China's Tianjin University have used 3-D laser printing to fabricate centimeter-sized objects of atomically thin graphene.

The research could yield industrially useful quantities of bulk graphene and is described online in a new study in the American Chemical Society journal ACS...

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Algae: The final frontier

Algae dominate the oceans that cover nearly three-quarters of our planet, and produce half of the oxygen that we breathe. And yet fewer than 10 percent of the algae have been formally described in the scientific literature, as noted in a new review co-authored by Carnegie's Arthur Grossman in Trends in Plant Science.

Algae are everywhere. They are part of crusts on desert surfaces and form massive blooms in lakes and oceans. They range in size from tiny single-celled...

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flipping the switch to stop tumor development

Freiburg researchers show how a protein prevents the uncontrolled expansion of immune cells

The mammalian immune system consists of millions of individual cells that are produced daily from precursor cells in the bone marrow. During their development,...

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

22.06.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

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