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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 243,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 243,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Streamlining accelerated computing for industry

PyFR code combines high accuracy with flexibility to resolve unsteady turbulence problems

Scientists and engineers striving to create the next machine-age marvel--whether it be a more aerodynamic rocket, a faster race car, or a higher-efficiency jet...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Environmental DNA uncovers biodiversity in rivers

Researchers from UZH and Eawag have used “environmental DNA” to determine the biodiversity of a river. Previously, this involved collecting and identifying all the organisms living in it. Using environmental DNA, however, not only is it possible to characterize the river’s biodiversity, but also that of the surrounding landscape.

Most natural ecosystems are heavily affected by changes to the human habitat, climate change or invasive species. In order to protect these ecosystems, one...

30.08.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Solar houses scientifically evaluated

According to the current German Energy Savings Ordinance, new residential buildings are to require one quarter less primary energy. Solar houses with large collector surface areas meet this requirement. In these well-insulated buildings, solar energy systems cover at least 50 per cent of the heat demand. The BINE Projektinfo brochure 'Assessing solar houses in energy and economic terms' (09/2016) details the costs and energy requirements of the various solar house concepts.

Primary energy demand and costs in comparison

30.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Amazon forests: Biodiversity can help mitigate climate risks

A forest with greater diversity of plants can better adjust to climatic stress. Now for the first time, a team of scientists can show this in computer simulations of the Amazon region by accounting for its amazing diversity of trees. Biodiversity can hence be an effective means to mitigate climate risks and should not only be seen in the context of nature conservation.

“Plant trait diversity may enable the Amazon forests, the world’s greatest and maybe most fascinating tropical ecosystem, to adjust to some level of climate...

30.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bringing artificial enzymes closer to nature

Scientists at the University of Basel, ETH Zurich, and NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering have developed an artificial metalloenzyme that catalyses a reaction inside of cells without equivalent in nature. This could be a prime example for creating new non-natural metabolic pathways inside living cells, as reported today in Nature.

The artificial metalloenzyme, termed biot-Ru–SAV, was created using the biotin–streptavidin technology. This method relies on the high affinity of the protein...

30.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

3-D-printed structures 'remember' their shapes

Heat-responsive materials may aid in controlled drug delivery and solar panel tracking

Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their...

29.08.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

From rigid to flexible

In order for cells to function properly, cargo needs to be constantly transported from one point to another within the cell, like on a goods station.

This cargo is located in or on intracellular membranes, called vesicles. These membranes have a signature, and only those with the correct signature may fuse...

29.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sensor systems identify senior citizens at risk of falling within 3 weeks

Each year, millions of people--especially those 65 and older--fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. Now, researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing and the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri found that sensors that measure in-home gait speed and stride length can predict likely falls. This technology can assist health providers to detect changes and intervene before a fall occurs within a three-week period.

"We have developed a non-wearable sensor system that can measure walking patterns in the home, including gait speed and stride length," said Marjorie Skubic,...

29.08.2016 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Cleanroom on demand

“Clean Multipurpose Cover” is the world’s first flexible cleanroom system

The smallest degree of contamination can lead to major quality issues across many industries. Should, for example, any impurities occur on microchips, space...

29.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Crystal unclear: Why might this uncanny crystal change laser design?

Laser applications may benefit from crystal research by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and China's Shandong University. They have discovered a potential way to sidestep longstanding difficulties with making the crystals that are a crucial part of laser technology. But the science behind their discovery has experts scratching their heads.

The findings, published today in Science Advances, suggest that the relatively large crystals used to change several properties of light in lasers - changes...

29.08.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Spherical tokamaks could provide path to limitless fusion energy

Creating "a star in a jar" - replicating on Earth the way the sun and stars create energy through fusion - requires a "jar" that can contain superhot plasma and is low-cost enough to be built around the world. Such a device would provide humankind with near limitless energy, ending dependence on fossil fuels for generating electricity.

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) say that a model for such a "jar," or fusion device, already exists in...

29.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Passive house indoor pool saves heat and electricity

Many cities and municipalities operate indoor pools in antiquated buildings and with inefficient technology. This puts a burden on operating costs, and swimming pools are facing scrutiny in many places. Innovative building concepts are needed to ensure continued year-round swimming, lessons and enjoyment for families. BINE Projektinfo brochure 'Fun in a passive house pool' (08/2016) introduces a leisure pool in Bamberg. The swimming pool was scientifically accompanied and optimised in the first three years.

Monitoring results now available

29.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Cell-compatible OLEDs for use with patients

Cytocompatibility studies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been carried out on cell cultures for the first time at the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP to test how well OLEDs are tolerated by cells. The results offer promising prospects for the use of OLEDs in the medical field, such as in light therapy. The findings were published in a white paper entitled “Preliminary cytocompatibility studies for encapsulated OLEDs” and likewise be presented at the 4th Industry Partners Day of the Fraunhofer FEP in Dresden on September 28, 2016.

Light therapy is an important means of promoting the healing of wounds. Difficult and protracted healing processes of the skin, such as are due to chronic and...

29.08.2016 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Symmetry crucial for building key biomaterial collagen in the lab

Collagen makes up the cartilage in our knee joints, the vessels that transport our blood, and is a crucial component in our bones. It is the most abundant protein found in the bodies of humans and many other animals. It is also an important biomaterial in modern medicine, used in wound healing, tissue repair, drug delivery and more.

Collagen makes up the cartilage in our knee joints, the vessels that transport our blood, and is a crucial component in our bones. It is the most abundant...

26.08.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Volcanic eruption masked acceleration in sea level rise

Mount Pinatubo eruption predated start of satellite observation record

The cataclysmic 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines masked the full impact of greenhouse gases on accelerating sea level rise, according to a...

26.08.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Moth takes advantage of defensive compounds in Physalis fruits

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology found that the specialist moth Heliothis subflexa benefits from secondary plant components by turning the original defensive function of these compounds into its own advantage. Withanolides, which are present in Physalis plants, usually act as immune suppressants and feeding deterrents in insects. Surprisingly, Heliothis subflexa uses these plant defenses as immune-system boosters. Moreover, withanolides protect the moth from harmful effects caused by pathogenic bacteria. The new study demonstrates a unique benefit to host-plant specialization. (Nature Communications, August 2016, doi: 10.1038/NCOMMS12530).

Insects versus plants in the evolutionary arms race: specialists and generalists

26.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Newly discovered 'multicomponent' virus can infect animals

Scientists have identified a new "multicomponent" virus -- one containing different segments of genetic material in separate particles -- that can infect animals, according to research published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

This new pathogen, called Guaico Culex virus (GCXV), was isolated from several species of mosquitoes in Central and South America. GCXV does not appear to...

26.08.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Designing ultrasound tools with Lego-like proteins

Ultrasound imaging is used around the world to help visualize developing babies and diagnose diseases. Sound waves bounce off the tissues, revealing their different densities and shapes. The next step in ultrasound technology is to image not just anatomy, but specific cells and molecules deeper in the body, such as those associated with tumors or bacteria in our gut.

A new study from Caltech outlines how protein engineering techniques might help achieve this milestone. The researchers engineered protein-shelled...

26.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Allergy Research: Response to House Dust Mites is Age-Dependent

In adults with a house dust mite allergy, a cascade of inflammatory signals on the surface of the airways leads to airway remodeling. This process cannot be influenced by standard cortisone therapy. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich have reported these findings in the latest issue of the ‘Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology’.

Worldwide more than 300 million people suffer from asthma. A common symptom in this context is airway remodeling: a pathological remodeling of the airway...

26.08.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Spherical tokamak as model for next steps in fusion energy

Among the top puzzles in the development of fusion energy is the best shape for the magnetic facility -- or "bottle" -- that will provide the next steps in the development of fusion reactors. Leading candidates include spherical tokamaks, compact machines that are shaped like cored apples, compared with the doughnut-like shape of conventional tokamaks. The spherical design produces high-pressure plasmas -- essential ingredients for fusion reactions -- with relatively low and cost-effective magnetic fields.

Among the top puzzles in the development of fusion energy is the best shape for the magnetic facility -- or "bottle" -- that will provide the next steps in the...

25.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Scientists identify spark plug that ignites nerve cell demise in ALS

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder.

Rearchers say the findings of their study, published Aug. 5 in the journal Science, may lead to new therapies to halt the progression of the uniformly fatal...

25.08.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Secure networks for the Internet of the future

Two new projects at the University of Würzburg's Institute of Computer Science receive nearly EUR 750,000 worth of funding. The institute is working to make secure and efficient networks for the Internet of the future happen.

Large data centres are the major checkpoints of the Internet. They save, process and forward business data and private information. Today's data centres have...

25.08.2016 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

An effective and low-cost solution for storing solar energy

How can we store solar energy for period when the sun doesn't shine? One solution is to convert it into hydrogen through water electrolysis. The idea is to use the electrical current produced by a solar panel to 'split' water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. Clean hydrogen can then be stored away for future use to produce electricity on demand, or even as a fuel.

But this is where things get complicated. Even though different hydrogen-production technologies have given us promising results in the lab, they are still too...

25.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

PRB projects world population rising 33 percent by 2050 to nearly 10 billion

The world population will reach 9.9 billion in 2050, up 33 percent from an estimated 7.4 billion now, according to projections included in the latest World Population Data Sheet from the Population Reference Bureau (PRB).

The world population would hit the 10 billion mark in 2053 if the assumptions underlying PRB's 2050 projections are applied to subsequent years.

25.08.2016 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Environmental DNA uncovers biodiversity in rivers

30.08.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Solar houses scientifically evaluated

30.08.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Amazon forests: Biodiversity can help mitigate climate risks

30.08.2016 | Life Sciences

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