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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 251,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 251,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

Novel process facilitates production of high-voltage cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

Power on the go is in demand: The higher the battery capacity, the larger the range of electric cars and the longer the operating time of cell phones and...

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New material for digital memories of the future

Ferroelectric self-assembled molecular materials

Professor Martijn Kemerink of Linköping University has worked with colleagues in Spain and the Netherlands to develop the first material with conductivity...

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

Researchers from Caltech and the University of Southern California (USC) report the first application of quantum computing to a physics problem. By employing quantum-compatible machine learning techniques, they developed a method of extracting a rare Higgs boson signal from copious noise data. Higgs is the particle that was predicted to imbue elementary particles with mass and was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The new quantum machine learning method is found to perform well even with small datasets, unlike the standard counterparts.

Despite the central role of physics in quantum computing, until now, no problem of interest for physics researchers has been resolved by quantum computing...

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

NASA team finds noxious ice cloud on saturn's moon titan

Researchers with NASA's Cassini mission found evidence of a toxic hybrid ice in a wispy cloud high above the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan.

The finding is a new demonstration of the complex chemistry occurring in Titan's atmosphere--in this case, cloud formation in the giant moon's...

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New procedure enables cultivation of human brain sections in the petri dish

Tübingen researchers open up new possibilities in brain tissue research

Researchers at the University of Tübingen have become the first to keep human brain tissue alive outside the body for serveral weeks. The researchers, headed...

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The “everywhere” protein: honour for the unravellor of its biology

Professor Alexander Varshavsky from the California Institute of Technology, USA, has received the 2017 Heinrich Wieland Prize for discovering the biology of the ubiquitin system. Dr Varshavsky showed that the ubiquitin system is a master regulator that precisely tunes the levels of proteins in cells, thereby controlling a strikingly wide range of their processes, including division, protein synthesis, and stress responses. The 100,000-euro prize awarded by the non-profit Boehringer Ingelheim Foundation will be presented during a scientific symposium in Munich, Germany, on 19 October 2017.

Anything that influences proteins can have wide-ranging consequences. After all, they are the workhorses of every cell, in that they carry messages, form...

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Rapid environmental change makes species more vulnerable to extinction

Interactions between species play a key role in shaping biodiversity. A team of researchers including members of UZH has now shown that the coevolution of species that are embedded in complex networks of interactions is not only influenced directly by their partners but also indirectly by other species. This slows down the ability of complex communities to adapt to environmental change. Rapid climate changes are therefore likely to increase species’ risk of becoming extinct.

When species interact with each other, they do not evolve separately, but do so together. This process is called coevolution. Natural selection favors...

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens

Findings published in Analytical Chemistry and BioMedical Devices

A multidisciplinary group that includes the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington at Tacoma has developed a novel...

19.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming

Reefs near Texas endured punctuated bursts of sea-level rise before drowning

Scientists from Rice University and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi's Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies have discovered that Earth's sea...

19.10.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Individual Receptors Caught at Work

Using a revolutionary live-cell microscopy technique, an international team of scientist has observed for the first time individual receptors for hormones and widely used drugs at work in intact cells.

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the "hottest” targets for the therapy of diseases such as hypertension, asthma or Parkinson´s. These receptors...

19.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Riddle of matter remains unsolved: Proton and antiproton share fundamental properties

Magnetic forces in antiprotons now measured to nine significant digits—350 times more precise than before

The search goes on. No difference in protons and antiprotons have yet been found which would help to potentially explain the existence of matter in our...

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

Osaka University-led research team develops new way to make non-stick fluoropolymers adhesive using heat and plasma

The convenience of non-stick, Teflon-coated cookware is appreciated in kitchens worldwide, particularly by anyone doing the washing up. The chemical making up...

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

While it's true that space radiation is one of the biggest challenges for a human journey to Mars, it's also true that NASA is developing technologies and countermeasures to ensure a safe and successful journey to the red planet.

"Some people think that radiation will keep NASA from sending people to Mars, but that's not the current situation," said, Pat Troutman, NASA Human Exploration...

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

Gravitational-wave observation confirms heavy-elements theory

Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on August 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser...

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Study shows how water could have flowed on 'cold and icy' ancient Mars

For scientists trying to understand what ancient Mars might have been like, the red planet sends some mixed signals. Water-carved valleys and lakebeds leave little doubt that water once flowed on the surface. But climate models for early Mars suggest average temperatures around the globe stayed well below freezing.

A recent study led by Brown University geologists offers a potential bridge between the "warm and wet" story told by Martian geology and the "cold and icy"...

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays

If brain imaging could be compared to Google Earth, neuroscientists would already have a pretty good "satellite view" of the brain, and a great "street view" of neuron details. But navigating how the brain computes is arguably where the action is, and neuroscience's "navigational map view" has been a bit meager.

Now, a research team led by Eva Dyer, a computational neuroscientist and electrical engineer, has imaged brains at that map-like or "meso" scale using the most...

18.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bridging the terahertz gap

Optical frequency comb offers a convenient way to generate elusive terahertz frequencies

Optical frequency combs are widely-used, high-precision tools for measuring and detecting different frequencies -- a.k.a. colors -- of light. Unlike...

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

IVAM Product Market „High-tech for Medical Devices“ at COMPAMED 2017

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

The demand for miniaturization in medical devices continues to grow rapidly. Especially in devices for mobile diagnostics, therapy and laboratories, reliable...

18.10.2017 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Researchers release the brakes on the immune system

Many tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural “brakes” in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive immune response. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to take off one of these brakes. The study, which involved colleagues from Hamburg and Würzburg, could pave the way for more effective cancer therapies. It is being published in the journal Cell Reports.

Killer T cells are a powerful weapon of the immune system. Following a viral infection, for instance, they swarm out in huge numbers and destroy all of the...

18.10.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient

To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes: filters that stop the methane and let the CO2 pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much more effective.

When it comes to extracting natural gas or producing biogas, it's all about the methane. But methane is never found in its pure form. Natural gas, for...

18.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have performed neutron structural analysis of a vitamin B6-dependent protein, potentially opening avenues for new antibiotics and drugs to battle diseases such as drug-resistant tuberculosis, malaria and diabetes.

Specifically, the team used neutron crystallography to study the location of hydrogen atoms in aspartate aminotransferase, or AAT, an enzyme vital to the...

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

Microbes in the atmosphere and the role of the oceans in their movement have been largely overlooked by researchers. Now, an international team shows that the oceans contribute to a large fraction of the microbes found in the global atmosphere.

Understanding the oceans' role as a source and sink for airborne microbes can provide insight into the maintenance of microbial diversity and how human, animal...

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible picture of newly formed Tropical Storm Lan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

Tropical Storm Lan developed on Oct. 15 and has been moving to the west-northwest over open ocean.

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

New material for digital memories of the future

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

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