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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 252,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 252,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Making fuel out of thick air

Scientists hoping to develop new energy resources have long pursued the goal of directly converting methane, a simple and abundant chemical found in natural gas, into a usable fuel such as methanol. Until now, scientists have required expensive-to-generate high temperatures to do this.

In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, Tufts University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory teamed up...

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

Device's braided qubits could form component of topological quantum computer

Rice University physicists dedicated to creating the working components of a fault-tolerant quantum computer have succeeded in creating a previously unseen...

08.12.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they're at home or on the go.

Currently, checking blood sugar levels can be a hassle for people with diabetes, especially when they have to pack their glucose monitoring kits around with...

08.12.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

‘Spying’ on the hidden geometry of complex networks through machine intelligence

An international team of scientists led by Dr. Carlo Vittorio Cannistraci, Junior Group Leader of the Biomedical Cybernetics lab at the BIOTEChnology Center TU Dresden, has developed ‘coalescent embedding’: a class of algorithms that leverage machine intelligence to retrieve the hidden geometrical rules that shape the structure of complex networks. From brain connectivity to social media, ‘coalescent embedding’ can have a future impact on disparate fields dealing with big-network-data including biology, medicine, physics and social science.

Archimedes envisioned that a network structure - a polygon made by triangles - created by sampling the geometrical law of a circle, is a useful device to...

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Acrobatic duo in the cells

Just like an acrobatic duo, some proteins lend each other stability. Researchers at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel have discovered that the protein “Trigger factor” recognizes a partner by instable, flexible domains, to then together form a stable protein duo. The study has been published in the current issue of “Nature Communications”.

Misfolded proteins are non-functional and cause cell damage. In order to prevent this, there is a whole arsenal of proteins – called chaperones – that assist...

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Mars’ atmosphere well protected from the solar wind

Despite the absence of a global Earth-like magnetic dipole, the Martian atmosphere is well protected from the effects of the solar wind on ion escape from the planet. New research shows this using measurements from the Swedish particle instrument ASPERA-3 on the Mars Express spacecraft. The results have recently been presented in a doctoral thesis by Robin Ramstad, Swedish Institute of Space Physics and Umeå University, Sweden.

Present-day Mars is a cold and dry planet with less than 1% of Earth’s atmospheric pressure at the surface. However many geological features indicate the...

08.12.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The future of crop engineering

Photosynthesis is the process underlying all plant growth. Scientists aim to boost photosynthesis to meet the increasing global demand for food by engineering its key enzyme Rubisco. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have succeeded in producing functional plant Rubisco in a bacterium. This allows genetic engineering of the enzyme. The study could one day lead to better crop yields and plant varieties with increased water-use efficiencies or enhanced temperature resistance. The results were published in Science.

The world's population is predicted to exceed 9 billion in 2050. With more mouths to feed, there is a pressing need for improved food output. To meet the...

08.12.2017 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

New manifestation of magnetic monopoles discovered

Significant effort has gone into engineering the long-sought magnetic monopoles. Now scientists have found them in an unexpected place, and revealed that they have been around for a long time.

The startling similarity between the physical laws describing electric phenomena and those describing magnetic phenomena has been known since the 19th century....

08.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UChicago scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains

New manufacturing technique overcomes half-century of failed attempts

For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published...

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotech

DNA bricks enable self-assembly of 3-D nanostructures from 10,000 unique components, advancing DNA nanotech from Mega to GigaDalton scale.

DNA, present in almost every cell, is increasingly being used as a building material to construct tiny, but sophisticated structures such as autonomous 'DNA...

07.12.2017 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow

A team led by scientists at Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury.

Called TRPM4, this protein is found in tissues throughout the body, including the brain, heart, kidney, colon and intestines, where it plays a major role in...

07.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New project to investigate the role of novel protein in cancer metastasis

Daria Siekhaus funded by NFB – Collaboration with Karl Landsteiner University for Health Sciences to investigate role of MFSD1 in metastasis in mice and humans

Metastasis, the process in which a tumor spreads to other parts of the body, is responsible for 90% of deaths from tumors. It is the greatest challenge to a...

07.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Detection of bacterial biofilms using covalent lectin binders

HIPS researchers produced a molecule that provides a way to visualise Pseudomonas infections

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major pathogen that can cause severe infections in various organs of the human body. The infection becomes particularly harmful...

07.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA's SuperTIGER balloon flies again to study heavy cosmic particles

A science team in Antarctica is preparing to loft a balloon-borne instrument to collect information on cosmic rays, high-energy particles from beyond the solar system that enter Earth's atmosphere every moment of every day. The instrument, called the Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (SuperTIGER), is designed to study rare heavy nuclei, which hold clues about where and how cosmic rays attain speeds up to nearly the speed of light.

The launch is expected by Dec. 10, weather permitting.

"The previous flight of SuperTIGER lasted 55 days, setting a record for the longest flight of any heavy-lift scientific balloon," said Robert Binns, the...

07.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Routing gene therapy directly into the brain

Researchers report that transplanting genetically-engineered cells directly into the brain could help treat a variety of central nervous system diseases

A therapeutic technique to transplant blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells directly into the brain could herald a revolution in our approach to treating...

07.12.2017 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New test procedure for developing quick-charging lithium-ion batteries

When lithium-ion batteries are charged too quickly, metallic lithium gets deposited on the anodes. This reduces battery capacity and lifespan and can even destroy the batteries. Scientists at the Forschungszentrum Jülich and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now presented a process that, for the first time ever, allows this so-called lithium plating process to be investigated directly. This puts new strategies for quick-charging strategies close at hand.

Lithium plating, the depositing of metallic lithium at the anodes of lithium-ion batteries, is one of the primary factors that limits charging current. The...

07.12.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Study reveals significant role of dust in mountain ecosystems

Trees growing atop the Bald Mountain Granite in the southern Sierra Nevada rely on nutrients from windblown atmospheric dust -- more than 50 percent -- compared to nutrients provided from underlying bedrock.

University of Wyoming researchers led a study that found this surprising result by measuring the isotopes of neodymium in the bedrock, soil, dust and pine...

07.12.2017 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Shedding light on the dark proteome with IMB’s newest Adjunct Director

In a joint appointment with Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Institute of Molecular Biology, Mainz (IMB) is excited to announce the recruitment of Edward Lemke from EMBL, Heidelberg as an Adjunct Director. Professor Lemke will be continuing his groundbreaking work blending chemistry and single molecule biophysics together to unravel the structure and function of intrinsically disordered proteins (the dark proteome).

One of the first analogies that people learn when studying biology is that the specific interaction of proteins is like a lock and key. The 3D shape of the...

07.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

DNA origami: Building virus-sized structures and saving costs through mass production

It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicist Hendrik Dietz has been building nanometer-scale objects for several years at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Now Dietz and his team have not only broken out of the nanometer realm to build larger objects, but have also cut the production costs a thousand-fold. These innovations open a whole new frontier for the technology.

Viruses encapsulate their genetic material in a shell comprising a series of identical protein building blocks. The hepatitis B virus capsule, for example,...

07.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

07.12.2017 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Two Super-Earths around red dwarf K2-18

Researchers find exciting potential for little-known exoplanet -- and discover another planet in the process

New research using data collected by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has revealed that a little-known exoplanet called K2-18b could well be a scaled-up...

06.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Study finds variation within species is a critical aspect of biodiversity

Researchers compared the ecological consequences of variation within species and among species, and found similar effects in many cases

Concerns about biodiversity tend to focus on the loss of species from ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the loss of variation within species can also...

06.12.2017 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45P

When comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. The results help fill in crucial details about ices in Jupiter-family comets and reveal that quirky 45P doesn't quite match any comet studied so far.

Like a doctor recording vital signs, the team measured the levels of nine gases released from the icy nucleus into the comet's thin atmosphere, or coma....

06.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Making fuel out of thick air

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

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