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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 243,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 243,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

A submillimeter-thick film with magnetic microdomains was used to control a Q-switched laser, increasing its pulse power 1,000 times

The "Industry 4.0" concept, first introduced by the German government, has recently extended the scope of compact high-power laser applications to, for...

28.07.2016 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

New material could advance superconductivity

Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. A metallic state of hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, which increases electricity transfer efficiency many times over. For the first time researchers, led by Carnegie's Viktor Struzhkin, have experimentally produced a new class of materials blending hydrogen with sodium that could alter the superconductivity landscape and could be used for hydrogen-fuel cell storage. The research is published in Nature Communications.

It had been predicted that certain hydrogen-rich compounds consisting of multiple atoms of hydrogen with so-called alkali metals like lithium, potassium or...

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

Study of natural-occurring 100,000 year-old CO2 reservoirs shows no significant corroding of 'cap rock', suggesting the greenhouse gas hasn't leaked back out - one of the main concerns with greenhouse gas reduction proposal of carbon capture and storage.

New research shows that natural accumulations of carbon dioxide (CO2) that have been trapped underground for around 100,000 years have not significantly...

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The intravenous swim team

Drexel's microswimmer robot chains can decouple and reconnect in a magnetic field

Drexel University researchers, led by MinJun Kim, PhD, a professor in the College of Engineering, have successfully pulled off a feat that both sci-fi fans and...

28.07.2016 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Keep a lid on it: Utah State University geologists probe geological carbon storage

Jim Evans and collaborators study Utah's Carmel Formation

Effective carbon capture and storage or "CCS" in underground reservoirs is one possible way to meet ambitious climate change targets demanded by countries and...

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

How Invasive Plants Influence an Ecosystem

A research team uses the example of the acacia to show how interaction between native and invasive species varies

Acacia longifolia, a species of acacia from the Fabacean family that is native to Australia, was initially cultivated in Portugal as a means of securing sand...

28.07.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Heraeus presents new technologies for foldable touch panels at Touch Taiwan Exhibition

Touch Taiwan 2016: Heraeus launches new dry-film resist photolithography fine patterning process technology for conductive polymer films and demonstrates rapid IR curing solutions for flexible touch displays

At this year Touch Taiwan from August 24-26 Heraeus launches a new touch panel process to pattern Clevios conductive polymer films by DFR (dry-film resist)...

28.07.2016 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

New study reveals where MH370 debris more likely to be found

A team of researchers in Italy has used the location of confirmed debris from MH370 to determine where the airliner might have crashed, and where further debris could be found. The study is published today (27 July) in Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

“Our result is the first to calculate the movement of the debris that best agrees with all five of the currently confirmed discoveries. This should make it the...

27.07.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Dirty to drinkable

Engineers develop novel hybrid nanomaterials to transform water

Graphene oxide has been hailed as a veritable wonder material; when incorporated into nanocellulose foam, the lab-created substance is light, strong and...

27.07.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Exploring one of the largest salt flats in the world

UMass Amherst researchers find Chilean salt flat drains a surprisingly vast area

A recent research report about one of the largest lithium brine and salt deposits in the world in Chile's Atacama Desert by geoscientists from the University...

27.07.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New model is first to predict tree growth in earliest stages of tree life

Model can help forest managers better maintain forests by predicting which trees will survive

Land managers, forestry professionals and conservationists seek to predict how trees will grow so they can better manage existing forests and regrow forests...

27.07.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

New evidence: How amino acid cysteine combats Huntington's disease

Study clarifies tie between cysteine deficiency and Huntington's disease

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified a biochemical pathway linking oxidative stress and the amino acid cysteine in Huntington's...

27.07.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Cord blood outperforms matched, unrelated donor in bone marrow transplant

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study compared outcomes of leukemia patients receiving bone marrow transplants from 2009-2014, finding that three years post transplant, the incidence of severe chronic graft-versus-host disease was 44 percent in patients who had received transplants from matched, unrelated donors (MUD) and 8 percent in patients who had received umbilical cord blood transplants (CBT). Patients who received CBT were also more likely to no longer need immunosuppression and less likely to experience late infections and hospitalizations. There was no difference in overall survival between these two techniques. Results are published in the journal Bone Marrow Transplant.

"When you do an allogeneic transplant - when someone else is the donor - the new blood system has the potential to attack the patient. This is...

27.07.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New approach for environmental test on livestock drugs

Drugs for livestock can harm beneficial organisms that break down dung. Therefore newly developed medical substances need to be tested on single species in the lab. An international research group including evolutionary biologists from the University of Zurich have been scrutinizing the reliability of such laboratory tests, evaluating the implementation of a field test based on the anti-parasitic drug ivermectin at four climatically different locations. The scientists thus presented a novel approach for more advanced environmental compatibility tests.

Livestock medications can impair beneficial organisms that break down dung. Too high a dosage of ivermectin, a common drug against parasites, harms...

27.07.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Two neonicotinoid insecticides may have inadvertent contraceptive effects on male honey bees

Male honey bees, called drones, can be affected by two neonicotinoid insecticides by reducing male honey bee lifespan and number of living sperm. Both insecticides are currently partially banned in Europe. Researchers from Bern, Switzerland, together with partners from Thailand and Germany, call for more thorough environmental risk assessments of these neonicotinoids.

In recent years, beekeepers have struggled to maintain healthy honey bee colonies throughout the northern hemisphere. In the first study to investigate the...

27.07.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Perseus translates proteomics data

Do you speak -omics? If you don't, Perseus – www.perseus-framework.org might be able to help you. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried have developed this free software platform for users of high-throughput techniques, such as mass spectrometry, in order to translate raw biological data into relevant findings. As reported in the current issue of Nature Methods, molecular signatures from cells, tissue and body fluids can be identified and characterized on this platform without the need for bioinformatic training. Perseus was designed to deal with proteomic studies. It has also proven itself in other molecular studies and will be expanded accordingly.

Do you speak -omics? If you don't, Perseus – www.perseus-framework.org might be able to help you. Researchers in Martinsried have developed this free software...

27.07.2016 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Body Talk: A New Crowdshaping Technology Uses Words to Create Accurate 3D Body Models

New alternatives to 3D body scanning

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and the University of Texas at Dallas, revealed new crowdshaping technology at SIGGRAPH 2016...

27.07.2016 | Interdisciplinary Research | nachricht Read more

New movie screen allows for glasses-free 3-D

Co-developed by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, display enables viewers to watch a 3-D movie from any seat in a theater

3-D movies immerse us in new worlds and allow us to see places and things that we otherwise couldn't. But behind every 3-D experience is something that is...

26.07.2016 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Scientists develop painless and inexpensive microneedle system to monitor drugs

Researchers at the University of British Columbia and the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland have created a microneedle drug monitoring system that could one day replace costly, invasive blood draws and improve patient comfort.

The new system consists of a small, thin patch that is pressed against a patient's arm during medical treatment and measures drugs in their bloodstream...

26.07.2016 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Astronomers discover dizzying spin of the Milky Way galaxy's 'halo'

Astronomers at the University of Michigan's College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) discovered for the first time that the hot gas in the halo of the Milky Way galaxy is spinning in the same direction and at comparable speed as the galaxy's disk, which contains our stars, planets, gas, and dust. This new knowledge sheds light on how individual atoms have assembled into stars, planets, and galaxies like our own, and what the future holds for these galaxies.

Astronomers at the University of Michigan's College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) discovered for the first time that the hot gas in the halo of...

26.07.2016 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Ultra-flat circuits will have unique properties

Rice University lab studies 2-D hybrids to see how they differ from common electronics

The old rules don't necessarily apply when building electronic components out of two-dimensional materials, according to scientists at Rice University.

26.07.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Marine carbon sinking rates confirm importance of polar oceans

About the same amount of atmospheric carbon that goes into creating plants on land goes into the bodies of tiny marine plants known as plankton. When these...

26.07.2016 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New nontoxic process promises larger ultrathin sheets of 2-D nanomaterials

A team of scientists led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. The environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.

"It's actually a very simple procedure," said ORNL chemist Huiyuan Zhu, who co-authored a study published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition. "We...

26.07.2016 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

28.07.2016 | Information Technology

New material could advance superconductivity

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

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