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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 254,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 254,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

Liquid crystals undergo a peculiar type of phase change. At a certain temperature, their cigar-shaped molecules go from a disordered jumble to a more orderly arrangement in which they all point more or less in the same direction. LCD televisions take advantage of that phase change to project different colors in moving images.

For years, however, experiments have hinted at another liquid crystal state -- an intermediate state between the disordered and ordered states in which order...

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

Microgravity conditions affect DNA methylation of muscle cells, slowing their differentiation

Astronauts go through many physiological changes during their time in spaceflight, including lower muscle mass and slower muscle development. Similar symptoms...

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

Over the last two decades, scientists have discovered that the optical microscope can be used to detect, track and image objects much smaller than their traditional limit--about half the wavelength of visible light, or a few hundred nanometers.

That pioneering research, which won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, has enabled researchers to track proteins in fertilized eggs, visualize how molecules...

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Magnesium magnificent for plasmonic applications

Rice University, University of Cambridge synthesize and test nanoparticles of abundant material

Rice University researchers have synthesized and isolated plasmonic magnesium nanoparticles that show all the promise of their gold, silver and aluminum...

23.05.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Tunable diamond string may hold key to quantum memory

A process similar to guitar tuning improves storage time of quantum memory

A quantum internet promises completely secure communication. But using quantum bits or qubits to carry information requires a radically new piece of hardware -...

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)

The human brain is an exquisitely complex, organic CPU, made of trillions of connections between many billions of neurons. Understanding such a complicated organ is a massive scientific undertaking, and researchers often use simplified models to uncover small pieces of the neurological puzzle.

In a report published in Micromachines, researchers at The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science describe their new method to create one such...

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

One-way roads for spin currents

The spin is a type of angular momentum which is intrinsic to particles, grosso modo as if they were spinning on themselves. Particles can exchange their spin, and in this way spin currents can be formed in a material. Through years of research, scientists have learned how to control such spin currents in an analogous way such that they can control the flow of electrons, a field of physics known as spintronics.

The study of the effect of strong interactions in quantum systems is particularly challenging, however, it is well known that strong interaction between...

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

A simple mechanism could have been decisive for the development of life

The question of the origin of life remains one of the oldest unanswered scientific questions. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now shown for the first time that phase separation is an extremely efficient way of controlling the selection of chemical building blocks and providing advantages to certain molecules.

Life needs energy. Without energy, cells cannot move or divide, not even basic functions such as the production of simple proteins could be maintained. If...

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Genetic diversity helps protect against disease

So much for survival of the fittest – diversity is the key: a team of researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has succeeded in demonstrating experimentally that genetic diversity makes populations more resistant to disease.

Why is it that animal and plant species throughout the world have different genetic variants within their particular species, even though it is supposed to be...

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Spinning rugby balls: The rotation of the most massive galaxies

By targeting the most massive galaxies in our universe, astronomers have studied how their stars move. The results are surprising: while half of them spin around their short axis as expected, the other half turn around their long axis. Such kinematics are most likely the result of a special type of galaxy merger, involving already massive, similar-mass galaxies. This would imply that the growth of the most massive and the largest galaxies is governed by these rare events.

Surveying the extremes of the galaxy population

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Raiding the rape field

A high abundance of flowering grasslands in agricultural landscapes is beneficial: These grasslands provide shelter for predatory beetles and spiders and help farmers control pests.

Oilseed rape fields are home to a variety of insects that bother farmers. The pollen beetle is one of them. The beetle's larvae feed on the flower buds of...

23.05.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Turning entanglement upside down

A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. Instead of digging deep into the properties of quantum wave functions - which are notoriously hard to experimentally access - they propose to realize physical systems governed by the corresponding entanglement Hamiltonians. By doing so, entanglement properties of the original problem of interest become accessible via well-established tools. This radically new approach could help to improve understanding of quantum matter and open the way to new quantum technologies.

Quantum entanglement forms the heart of the second quantum revolution: it is a key characteristic used to understand forms of quantum matter, and a key...

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Designer cells: artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch

Complex reaction cascades can be triggered in artificial molecular systems: Swiss scientists have constructed an enzyme than can penetrate a mammalian cell and accelerate the release of a hormone. This then activates a gene switch that triggers the creation of a fluorescent protein. The findings were reported by researchers from the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, led by the University of Basel and ETH Zurich.

Nature relies on enzymes to accelerate energy-intensive biochemical reactions that are necessary for the preservation of life. However, natural enzymes are not...

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

PR of MCC: Carbon removal from atmosphere unavoidable for 1.5 degree target

Limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees will make the world increasingly dependent on technologies that extract CO2 from the atmosphere. However, technology development and expansion, as well as the start of pilot projects, are considerably lagging behind deployment in climate mitigation scenarios. In order to remain below the two-degree mark, however, the extensive use of a broad portfolio of "negative emission technologies" (NETs), as these techniques for CO2 removal are called, can be reduced to a minimum. This is one result of several new studies by the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC).

The scientists led an international consortium that has now published the results in a special section of the journal Environmental Research Letters.

22.05.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Achema 2018: New camera system monitors distillation and helps save energy

In order to separate chemical mixtures into their single components, industry operators commonly carry out energy-intensive distillation, such as in crude oil refineries. Researchers at the Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK) are developing a camera system that monitors this process. It measures whether there is a high degree of droplet formation, which can negatively affect the separation of components. In the future, this technology could take countermeasures whenever the relevant measurement data change – and can also save energy.

At Achema, the exhibition on process technology in Frankfurt, they will be presenting the technology at the research stand of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate...

22.05.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Matabele ants: Travelling faster with detours

Ants do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their journey.

Termites are the African Matabele ants' (Megaponera analis) favourite dish. Proceeding in long files of 200 to 600, they raid termites at their foraging sites...

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell division

Stem cells in the brain can divide and mature into neurons participating in various brain functions, including memory. In a paper published in the journal ‘Cell Stem Cell’, scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) have shown how this works. They found that ion channels play a key role in mediating force signals to the neural stem cells to activate them.

The ancient Greek aphorism panta rhei means “everything flows”, a phrase used by philosophers to describe the constant flux and interplay between the past and...

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Chemists at FAU successfully demonstrate imine hydrogenation with inexpensive main group metal

In future, inexpensive and bio-compatible main group metals could replace expensive and toxic transition metals during catalytic processes. Chemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now demonstrated that imine hydrogenation is possible using calcium instead of precious metals. Catalytic conversion of imines to amines is an important process in producing fine chemicals, especially in the pharmaceutical industry. The results have now been published in the journal ‘Nature Catalysis’ (DOI: 0.1038/s41929-017-0006-0).

Platinum has been used for over two hundred years as a catalyst for inert materials. It is an excellent catalyst, as it can split molecules of hydrogen, oxygen...

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Asian tiger mosquito on the move

Invasion has a long tradition and is being accelerated by globalisation, trade and tourism

Due to global trade and tourism, mosquitoes - transmitters of dangerous infectious diseases - have spread to almost every part of the world.

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

22.05.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Embryonic development: How do limbs develop from cells?

New microscopy software enables precise monitoring of cells

During the development of a multicell organism, a single cell produces a range of different cell types which in turn form various tissues and organs.

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice--a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat management in future electronics devices.

"The discovery gives you a different way to control the flow of heat," said lead author Michael Manley of the paper published in Nature Communications. "It...

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

AWI contributes two million euros towards the cost of a new satellite mission

GRACE-FO mission launch on 22 May 2018 at 12:47 p.m. PST

18.05.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

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Industry & Economy
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Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

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